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Listing of Programmes for the Year: 2014 418 Programmes

Date Broadcast:
Thu 2nd Jan 2014
Duration:
8 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then report from the Falls Road on the activities of so-called 'death drivers', with video footage as it became a race track on New Year's Eve. Sinn Fein MLA Fra McCann comments. The DUP's Peter Robinson has denied the Haas talks were a failure even though they broke up with no agreement and Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams has warned the other parties not to 'fudge' their response to Haas' proposals. Film report on today's reactions. A new Historical Investigations Unit was proposed to look at all unsolved troubles murders, there was no consensus on flags, and a new office will deal with parades and protests. Meanwhile the UUP's Mike Nesbitt has accused the Alliance of 'cherry-picking' the proposals, which the Alliance's Chris Lyttle rejects. The SDLP's Alex Attwood wants the Haas proposals implemented. For the first time in its history the Gardaí are going to arm 120 of its uniformed officers due to the threat of dissident republicans and armed criminal gangs. Film report with Donegal business owner Gerard McDaid's reaction, then Fianna Fáil councillor Paul Canning. At Camp Twaddell a PSNI officer was injured as he was slashed in the face as a youth tried to damage a loyalist banner. He was arrested. Film report. (Thurs 6pm)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6547



Date Broadcast:
Mon 6th Jan 2014
Duration:
6 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
No opening titles. Today Richard Haas published a summary of his proposals on flags, parading and the past. This evening the UUP Executive meets to discuss its response to the proposals, while today Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness said that negative elements within the Orange Order were setting the agenda for the unionist parties. Film report from Martina Purdy on Haas proposals with reactions from unionist commentator Alex Kane who says that Haas is dead in the water. Then Martina Purdy reports on the Orange Order/Martin McGuinness verbal clash. The DUP will be considering Haas' proposals later this week. Denis Bradley (Bradley/Eames report) says that it is time for the two governments to step in to finish the process off. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly says that he has been given an informal warning over actions he took last summer where he blocked a PSNI land rover during an Orange parade. Film report on June 2013 events. In west Belfast community groups are meeting to discuss ways of dealing with car crime in the area. Film report shows video footage of cars racing, and Sinn Fein's Fra McCann comments, the Falls' Residents Association's T Quinn comments. In north Belfast the PSNI have arrested a man in connection with the 1994 murder of Catholic workmen Gary Convie and Eamon Fox by the UVF. The Alliance Party has condemned the racist attacks on 3 homes in east Belfast. (Mon 6.30)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6548



Date Broadcast:
Mon 6th Jan 2014
Duration:
14 mins 2 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the UUP Executive has said that the Haas proposals were not viable and were unacceptable, but that they would continue to seek a positive outcome to issues surrounding flags, parading and the past. Sharon O'Neill lists Haas' proposals, and that it was in the area of dealing with the past that the most progress was made, with a new Historical Investigations Unit set up to investigate troubles killings, and a new body would offer limited immunity for information retrieval in relation to troubles-related killings, plus investigation of themes from the past such as collusion and ethnic cleansing and the 'shoot to kill' policy. The parties must decide individually whether to buy the document or bin it. Then in the studio Brian Rowan, Alex Kane, Brian Feeney and Ulster University Professor Deirdre Heenan begin their discussion on has with the UUP Executive's decision to reject the Haas proposals and the ask 'what now?' for the Haas paper. Alex Kane says that he believes that Mike Nesbitt was over-ruled by his MLAs. Deirdre Heenan says that she feels that this will lead to further disenchantment with local politics. Brian Feeney says that he can't see the DUP accepting Haas now. Brian Rowan says that Eames/Bradley has been binned and that Haas is getting binned, but that there will be no electoral punishment for failure says Alex Kane. Brian Feeney says that the process is now 'dead as a dodo' and that no-one will be surprised by this failure. Deirdre Heenan says that politicians have no mutual trust. The commentators then discuss the chances of another talks process after the next elections. (Mon 10.30)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6549



Date Broadcast:
Tue 7th Jan 2014
Duration:
8 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The DUP says that more work is needed on the Haas proposals but that they have not given up on it. Film report on the DUP keeping its options open from Martina Purdy. It opens with Brian Faulkner's resignation after the UUP rejected the Sunningdale Agreement power-sharing deal, then 40 years later UUP leader Mike Nesbitt and his party reject the Haas proposals and says it is time for the Office of First and Deputy First Minister to decide what next? The SDLP's Alex Attwood says that this is Mike Nesbitt's 'Pontius Pilate' moment. Then the Alliance Party's Stephen Farry criticises the UUP. Willie Frazer says that there is nothing in Haas for victims of the IRA. The DUP's Peter Robinson gives his reaction, and Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly says that he wants to see the proposals implemented and that the negotiations are now over. The veteran republican Marian McGlinchey has been given a suspended sentence for a minor role in the killing of two British soldiers in Antrim where she bought a mobile phone for dissident republicans. A film report shows footage of her buying a mobile phone in Tesco, and covers the judge's comments and shows a video of the 1973 Old Bailey bombing in London for which she received two life sentences. A PSNI Officer has been given an informed warning for his conduct last summer when Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly was carried a distance on the bonnet of a PSNI Land Rover. (Tues 6.30)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6550



Date Broadcast:
Tue 7th Jan 2014
Duration:
7 mins 31 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the DUP's Peter Robinson says that the Haas proposals need more work. Last night the UUP rejected the proposals. A film report from Tracy Magee covers Peter Robinson's comments today and Mike Nesbitt's yesterday, with the reaction of the SDLP's Alex Attwood, who wants to see the proposals implemented. Then Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly says that the negotiations are over and that they aren't prepared to discuss changes, and that the proposals should be implemented now. The Alliance Party wants more discussions between the 5 party leaders. Then in the studio the Victims Commissioner Kathryn Stone gives her reaction to Haas' proposals and the parties responses. She says that victims will feel let down if politicians do not implement the proposals. She does highlight the fact that not all victims speak with the one voice. She highlights the fact that Haas says that victims should be given a choice and control over what they get access to. She mentions the Forum's dealing with the past working group which met Richard Haas. She thinks that the barriers should be worked through, and she hopes that the document isn't binned. She thanks politicians for their efforts. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6551



Date Broadcast:
Wed 8th Jan 2014
Duration:
5 mins 52 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In courts Mark Campbell (42) is charged with the May 1994 UVF murder of Catholic workmen Gary Convie and Eamon Fox at a north Belfast building site. Film report mentions a 2007 Police Ombudsman's Office report into the murders which criticised the RUC investigation, finding that there had been RUC/UVF collusion in north Belfast. The victims families' solicitor Padraig O' Muirigh comments. Late this afternoon Richard Haas issued a statement calling on parties here to set up a working group to implement a timetable for a cross-party deal. Political Editor Mark Devenport comments. Earlier Secretary of State Theresa Villiers was positive in getting more dialogue going. Also in the Commons Ian Paisley says that the DUP were right to reject the proposals. Then Peter Robinson's statement. (Wed 6.30)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6552



Date Broadcast:
Wed 8th Jan 2014
Duration:
14 mins 4 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines. With the failure of Haas what now for the Historical Enquiries Team (HET)? It was raised in the Commons in a debate earlier in the day. A problem for the HET is its credibility. A film report from Sharon O'Neill reviews the current situation. Haas had proposed a new unit with new powers called the Historical Investigations Unit, and a separate information retrieval body with limited immunity powers but it is all on hold. Ian Paisley Jr gives his views on keeping the HET, and dismisses the HIU idea. Theresa Villiers comments on the costs. Then Sharon O'Neill reviews the HET's work over the last 8 years, including the recent conviction of Seamus Kearney for the 1981 murder of RUC Reservist John Proctor but convictions were rare. It was mostly intelligence gathering for information to give to families but HM Inspectorate of Constabulary found that the HET viewed army killings more leniently, and that was the end of many families trust in the HET. Margaret Kennedy, who had two relatives killed by the army in 1971 gives her views on the HET, but with no agreement on the Haas proposals it is the only inquiry method available. Then in the studio Sharon O'Neill gives an update on the HET at present, which is suspended. The future of the HET is not a matter for the HET says a PSNI statement. In the studio the DUP's Jonathan Craig (who is on the Policing Board) and Mark Thompson from Relatives for Justice debate whether the HET will ever be operational again. Mark Thompson believes that the HET is a partial body and that it cannot be reformed, and it casts a dark shadow over policing. He wants Hass' HIU proposals implemented. Jonathan Craig believes that the HET problems can be fixed by the PSNI. Next a report on the court appearance of Mark Campbell for the May 1994 UVF killings of Gary Convie and Eamon Fox, with solicitor Padraig O' Muirigh's comments. (Wed 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6553



Date Broadcast:
Thu 9th Jan 2014
Duration:
5 mins 54 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then DUP Special Adviser Stephen Brimstone gives evidence over allegations against minister Nelson McCausland in a BBC Spotlight programme to a Commons committee. Film report on political interference into the running of the Housing Executive and Turkingtons Glaziers' role. In loyalist east Belfast a class in the Irish language has started. It is being run by Linda Ervine, whose brother-in-law was PUP leader David Ervine. Film report with Linda Ervine's comments and Philip McMullen's views. (Thurs 6.30)
DVD No.
D10010
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6554



Date Broadcast:
Thu 9th Jan 2014
Duration:
9 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then an interview with Richard Haas from New York. He says that his involvement with Northern Ireland is at an end. Indirectly Paul Clark says he seems to blame unionists for a lack of leadership. He was frustrated by the lack of agreement but calls it a living process. The 5 party agreement would make the people of Northern Ireland better off. He claims that there is more than enough in the agreement to suit all parties and for them to support. Haas feels that more talks will not reach consensus. It would be a tragedy for victims and survivors if details on the past weren't advanced he says, as so much was achieved unexpectedly on the past. He comments on the use of the word 'terrorist' in his document. He says that Northern Ireland needs to take control of its future. Finally he says that he was disappointed with Northern Ireland's politicians, and explains why. Then Political Editor Ken Reid gives his analysis of Richard Haas' interview and his views on Northern Ireland's political leadership. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6555



Date Broadcast:
Thu 9th Jan 2014
Duration:
33 mins 11 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers interviews US Envoy Richard Haas in New York, but first a film report from Mark Devenport reviews the last days of the Haas talks. Was it an embarrassing failure or is it a work still in progress? In their reaction, Gerry Adams said that he was prepared to accept it, warts and all, Alliance's Naomi Long backed Haas on the past but was disappointed on flags, the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell was in the yes camp, the UUP's Mike Nesbitt had been optimistic but then said it was not viable and was unacceptable. The DUP's Peter Robinson has set up a working party for them it is not a yes or a no, but a not yet, however DUP MPs in the Commons gave it a resounding no. Then Mark Carruthers interviews Richard Haas in New York. Haas says that it is too early to do a post-mortem on the talks results. He hopes that it can still move ahead. He feels that he gave all of the parties more than enough to go out and defend the final paper. He names the UUP, the DUP and the Alliance as the doubters not prepared to compromise for an agreement. It is pointed out that the Alliance were uncomfortable because they felt that he did not go far enough on flags. He repeats his point that all the parties need to ask themselves whether Northern Ireland would be better off with or without these changes. He believes that Northern Ireland would be better off with his proposals. He mentions devolved parading authority for unionists and examining patterns of violence, and no amnesties in the agreement. When looking at the agreement he says that parties shouldn't be selective, but should look at it in its entirety. It was the 5 parties' agreement, not his. He returned because he was optimistic about compromises. He says that the mood music during the talks was good, but that it was around the 30th or the 31st December that he realised that it wasn't working. He says that the parties should publically declare why they were not able to support the final paper. Haas denies that agreement on the past has unravelled over the last few days. He gives his views on the way that he feels the legacy of the past should be dealt with. He doesn't think that the missing ingredient is more time and more talks. The realities are not going to change. He feels that the two governments have a continuing role to play but that the local parties need to step up and compromise on preferences, not core principles. He comments on him not having a 'carrot and stick' with which to push things on. He believes that the final draft is ready to go and that they should avoid renegotiation as this will only create problems, but that is up to the 5 parties. Haas doesn't see himself and Megan O'Sullivan returning to Northern Ireland. He says what is needed now are insiders, not outsiders sorting this out. Back in the studio Mark Devenport, Fionnuala O'Connor and Alex Kane discuss the Haas interview. Mark Devenport highlights his pointing of the finger of blame at unionists, Fionnuala O'Connor highlights his view that they should begin implementation and that he pointed the finger of blame at where it lay for failing to compromise. Then Alex Kane says that he was 'a fed-up man'. He says that unionists haven't set out their specific objections to the proposals and Mike Nesbitt went from 70% yes to a no in under 24 hours., and he asks what it was that spooked him. Fionnuala O'Connor points out that senior Orangeman Mervyn Gibson was in the DUP delegation, and that Willie Frazer and Jamie Bryson were on the fringes and she asks if maybe they spooked unionists? Mark Devenport says that the working group that has been set up will not make progress without Haas there. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10110
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6556



Date Broadcast:
Fri 10th Jan 2014
Duration:
7 mins 52 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then DUP leader Peter Robinson has distanced himself from comments made by the former DUP First Minister Ian Paisley about the UVF bombings of Dublin & Monaghan in 1974. In a documentary to be shown next week Ian Paisley says that the Dublin government brought the bombings on themselves. Film report from Gareth Gordon on his Dublin remarks and other historical issues, then Peter Robinson's reaction and Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore's comments, then a more benign response from Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness. Paisley also criticises Peter Robinson for the 1986 invasion of the Monaghan village of Clontibret, however Robinson says that Paisley was to lead the Clontibret event but pulled out. Responding to a challenge from talks chairman Richard Haas that unionists and the Alliance had to justify why they hadn't felt ready to endorse the proposed deal. Peter Robinson says that the fact that only the nationalist parties felt able to sign up showed that the deal wasn't balanced. Film report with Haas' remarks, then Megan O'Sullivan, then Martin McGuinness on compromise, then the responses of Peter Robinson, Mike Nesbitt and Naomi Long. (Fri 6.30)
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6557



Date Broadcast:
Sat 11th Jan 2014
Duration:
2 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In Dublin Sinn Fein's Ard Comhairle has officially backed the Haas proposals. Film report with Martin McGuinness saying that he now wants to hear the British, Irish and American governments say that they support the Haas proposals. A loyalist flags protest in the centre of Belfast has passed off without incident. They were addressed by Willie Frazer. Film report. Gary Spedding, a member of the Alliance Party's youth wing has been deported from Israel due to his support for Palestinian human rights. Film report with interview with Gary, then Naomi Long's statement. (Sat 6pm)
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6558



Date Broadcast:
Mon 13th Jan 2014
Duration:
5 mins 73 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in court four dissident republicans caught with a gun near Omagh in 2010 are given jail sentences totalling 36 years. Film report names the men as Martin McClune (25), Darren McCallion (25), Mark McGuigan (29) and Darren Turnbull (33). MLAs returned to Stormont after the Christmas break where today there was a debate on the Haas talks proposals. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly comments, then the UUP's Tom Elliott, then the DUP's Peter Robinson, then the Alliance's Chris Lyttle then the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell. Stormont voted 52 to 49 not to accept Haas' proposals. Political Editor Ken Reid's analysis.
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
530
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6559



Date Broadcast:
Mon 13th Jan 2014
Duration:
37 mins 12 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Sunday Politics
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers introduces a 5 local party debate on why they couldn't agree on the Richard Haas talks proposals and where they lost an opportunity for a firm foundation to build on, but first a film report from Martina Purdy which examines the political drama over the latest attempts to tackle flags, parading and the past. It begins with Martin McGuinness and Peter Robinson welcoming Richard Haas to Northern Ireland. Then another clip from politicians as time progresses, the columnist Alex Kane pronounces the Haas talks as dead because there were too many problems, but Queens University Professor Rick Wilford is more optimistic. Then Bro McFerran (Allstate) says that it is sending out a bad message internationally. Haas then gives his response to unionists' rejection of his proposals and he has worries about re-opening issues with re-negotiations. Rick Wilford gives his views on the DUP's attitude, saying that he thinks that they have one eye on next year's election, especially in east Belfast, and that the DUP tail is wagging the dog, victims' campaigner Willie Frazer gives his views, then Denis Bradley (Eames/Bradley) says that the talks failure will create more negativity and disillusionment and separation of the two communities. Then in the studio Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly, the SDLP's Alex Attwood, UUP's Mike Nesbitt, DUP's Jeffrey Donaldson and Alliance's Naomi Long begin their discussion with a question to Alliance's Naomi Long 'Did your party either accept or reject Haas?', to which she replied that they did neither because they were critical of things that were not in the document. She explains the party's position on flags, parading and the past in relation to the Haas paper. Then Jeffrey Donaldson explains why the DUP did not sign up. He says that the document does not acknowledge that there was terrorism in Northern Ireland, and that it was terrorists who killed 90% of all victims. He questions how the DUP could compromise on such a reality. He compares it to the 9/11 atrocity in New York. The DUP wants further dialogue but admits that progress was made on dealing with the past. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly's position is that Richard Haas was invited in, the proposals were brought forward and should be implemented. He criticises the UUP's Mike Nesbitt for saying that he was 70/30 in favour of the document, then rejected it. Gerry Kelly is criticised for not continuing to talk to unionists. He comments on their problems with the Irish language. Then Mike Nesbitt explains his 70/30 remark. He raises the terrorism issue again, quoting Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore's use of the term when talking about the Dublin/Monaghan bombings. Gerry Kelly states that the British were involved in Dublin/Monaghan. Mike Nesbitt denies that he is trying to get Gerry Kelly to sign up to his narrative. He agrees with Innocent Victims United that it isn't a good deal. SDLP's Alex Attwood comments on the terror word. He highlights State and paramilitary terror. He says proposals on dealing with the past went a long way towards being accepted, and would have helped victims and survivors. The SDLP accepted changes to the Parades Commission in the talks, and he says that that was their compromise. Mark Carruthers then asks the panel what they think that the British Prime Minister David Cameron should do now, along with the Irish government. Naomi Long is sceptical about whether they want to get involved. Jeffrey Donaldson says that talks between the 5 parties need to close the gaps on outstanding issues. Gerry Kelly says that there isn't a single narrative. He is questioned on this. They again debate the word terrorism. Parties meet on Tuesday in Stormont. Panel give their closing remarks. Next Mark Carruthers interviews Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers, he asks her is it time for the two governments to become more active with the local parties. She maintains that the two governments have always been supportive of the process. She feels that it is a good idea for the 5 parties to hold further talks on these 3 issues and that it is wrong to say that Haas failed. She believes that Tuesday's leaders meeting of the 5 parties is important. Theresa Villiers says that the reality is that any agreement in Northern Ireland has to be cross party, and that that is what devolution is about. She refuses to say that they or the Irish government will chair future talks On funding Haas she says that this should come out of the block grant and she can't promise that the British or Irish government will provide funds. Then journalists Liam Clarke and Allison Morris give their views, firstly on Theresa Villiers interview and her funding remarks, and the parties' discussion on the use of the word terrorism, and the political stand-off that currently exists. Then Gareth Gordon presents a 60 second look at the political week gone by, including the death this week of NIO minister Paul Goggins, as well as Richard Haas laughing at the idea of returning to Northern Ireland. The journalists comment on the laugh and what they expect to happen in the next week. (Sunday)
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6560



Date Broadcast:
Mon 13th Jan 2014
Duration:
59 mins 18 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Paisley: From Genesis to Revelation (Part1)
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Journalist Eamon Maillie interviews former DUP leader and First Minister Ian Paisley about his career in Northern Ireland politics and the Free Presbyterian Church. The film also uses old TV clips to tell the Paisley story. After an introduction by Eamon Maillie and the opening credits, he begins by asking Paisley to define himself. Is he British, Irish, an Ulsterman or a mixture of all of these? Paisley says that he is a child of God, and that all of the other identities overlap in a man's life. He explains what he means about identity. He says that he is not ashamed to be called an Irishman. Then Maillie profiles Paisley's early life. He was born in 1926 in Armagh. His father James was a Baptist Minister and had been in the UVF. Paisley recalls his father's escape from IRA gunmen and a man speaking up for him. He was released. Aged 2 the family moved to Ballymena. He recalls his mother converting him, aged 6, to evangelism. He recalls family holidays in Warrenpoint and contacts he had with local residents. At 16 Paisley went to work on the farm of George Watson in Co Tyrone. He recalls what he learnt and the importance of the bible to him even then. He spoke at the church hall. He then moved to Wales to study theology and completed his studies in Belfast. His first missionary was in an evangelical church the Ravenhill Road, where he attracted large crowds for his revival meetings. Paisley then reveals how he was invited to join the mission hall in Crossgar, and the local internal church fallout that followed. From the split emerged Paisley's Free Presbyterian Church. Throughout the 1950s congregations sprang up across Northern Ireland. A black and white film clip shows Paisley preaching about Popish superstition and priestcraft. Maillie quotes his 1959 words about when the Queen Mother had an audience with the Pope and he accused the Royals of committing 'spiritual fornication and adultery with the anti-christ'. He says that that was the language of Luther and Calvin and that he has no apology to make. In 1962 Paisley took his anti-Catholic views to the Vatican. He recalls the issues back then. In 1963 when the Pope died he said that 'the Romanish man of sin is now in hell'. Paisley says that he is not sure that he said that. In politics Paisley was against any interference from the Republic of Ireland. Film clip shown. He says he saw himself in the tradition of Edward Carson. One of his associates back then was former RUC man DI Nixon. Paisley comments on their association. Despite the man being suspected of murder Paisley says that he was a man not afraid to stand up for what he believed in. Paisley was not involved in street protests against Irish nationalism. Film clip shown of an Irish tricolour being flown in Divis Republican Party's office and the riots that followed Paisley's threat to remove it in 1964. Paisley justifies his attitude back then. In 1967 Northern Ireland Prime Minister Terence O'Neill invited Irish Taoiseach Jack Lynch to Stormont. Film clip shows Paisley throwing snowballs at Lynch's car. Paisley again justifies his attitude back then. In 1966 Paisley led a march through the nationalist Cromac Street area to protest at a Presbyterian church meeting. A riot followed. Film clip shown. Paisley recalls his protest and the Presbyterian ecumenical movement. He blames the residents of Cromac Street. Also in 1966 Paisley launched the Protestant Telegraph. At one rally Paisley says that Catholic homes caught fire because they were filled with petrol bombs, that Catholic churches were arsenals and that priests were giving machine guns to their parishioners. Paisley said that it was true that there were guns in Catholic churches. He also says that Catholics were breeding like rabbits and multiplying like vermin. Paisley says that he didn't say that. Eamon Maillie then quotes other things that Paisley is alleged to have said and gets his opinion now on what he said back then, including his view that the PIRA was the military wing of the Catholic Church and other colourful views on 'popery'. In the mid-1960s the Civil Rights Association was founded at Queens University, Belfast. Film clip shown and Eamon Maillie explains their demands. In November 1968 in Armagh City Paisley organises an anti-CRA march. Film clip shown. It ended in a riot. Film clip shown of Paisley's comments at the time. Two weeks later Terence O'Neil makes his 'Ulster at the crossroads' TV speech. Film clip shown. To this day unionists rarely admit that electoral gerrymandering or discrimination against Catholics. In his remarks Paisley admits that things weren't right for Catholics back then. It wasn't justice at all. He says that the unionist government was responsible for what happened in the country. He also says that the Derry electoral gerrymandering was wrong and that that was no way to run any country. Eamon Maillie then asks him why he opposed 'one man one vote', as advocated by John Hume. He says that he did so because the Civil Rights Association was a united Ireland movement. He argues his case with Eamon Maillie. In August 1969 the Battle of the Bogside erupts. Film clip shows troops being sent in. Film clip shows Paisley calling O'Neill a dictator and a Lundy. Paisley's support grows in the community, enhanced by two short jail sentences. In 1970 Paisley is elected Stormont MP for Bannside. Months later he wins the north Antrim Westminster seat. In 1971 he forms the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) along with barrister Desmond Boal. Eamon Maillie asks him what his reaction was when he heard about Bloody Sunday in January 1972. Paisley says that he was angry and that the inquiry was a cover up. He says that he was glad to hear Prime Minister David Cameron's apology in 2010. London introduces direct rule, Stormont shuts down and the Sunningdale Agreement introduces a power-sharing Executive to run Northern Ireland in 1974. Paisley explains what he found so wrong about Sunningdale. He says that it was forced on the people of Northern Ireland. Film clip shows his belligerent tone at the time. Film clip shown of the Ulster Workers' Strike in 1974. Eamon Maillie asks Paisley how he felt sitting down with UDA leaders. Paisley says he wasn't challenging the rule of law, and that many people didn't break the law. More film clips of the Dublin/Monaghan UVF bombings that killed 34 people. Paisley says that he was shocked, but that the southern political leaders brought it upon themselves by their attitude to Northern Ireland at that time. He says that he denounced the bombers back then. 11 days later the Executive collapsed and direct rule was restored. The violence continues. Labour's Jim Callaghan saw Paisley as part of the problem here, as did Ted Heath and Roy Mason. Paisley says that his reaction, then and now, was to laugh at them. In 1977 Paisley led a second strike, again involving the UDA, the majority of whom Paisley says had 'clean hands and bright spirits'. The strike failed. In May 1979 Margaret Thatcher was elected Prime Minister. Airey Neave had been murdered by the INLA earlier. Unionists expected a tough response from Thatcher. Paisley comments, then in August 1979 18 British soldiers and Lord Mountbatten are killed on the one day. In 1980 Thatcher meets Irish Taoiseach Charlie Haughey in Dublin for talks on 'the totality of relationships'. Paisley calls this a betrayal that stirred up unionist opposition. Paisley started rallies where men waved gun licences. He comments on his message of 'no surrender' as a warning to Thatcher and to nationalists. 1981 'Third Force' rallies shown. In the Maze 10 hunger strikers died and Sinn Fein's electoral support surged. Paisley comments at a Third Force rally about killing IRA men. He now says that it had to be said. In 1985 the Anglo-Irish Agreement is signed, giving the Republic a consultative role in Northern Irish affairs for the first time. Paisley calls it a betrayal and surrender that united unionists. Film clip of 'Ulster says No' rally with Paisley's 'Never, Never, Never' speech. Paisley recalls that speech. It was a challenge to the state. August 1986 and Peter Robinson invades Clontibret. Paisley recalls the event and his row with Robinson, who paid a fine to avoid to avoid going to jail. PIRA violence continued. In Enniskillen a bomb kills 11 people. Downing Street is bombed. The British and Irish government had a secret line of communication with the PIRA that led to the 1994 ceasefire. Paisley saw no merit in ceasefire at that time. In 1998 the Good Friday Agreement is signed. Film clip shown. A referendum ratifies the Good Friday Agreement. Paisley recalls his feelings then on the Agreement, saying that it was a sell-out. Programme ends with a preview of part two.
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6561



Date Broadcast:
Tue 14th Jan 2014
Duration:
5 mins 37 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then report on security alerts. The five main party leaders have agreed to meet again next week for further post-Haas talks on flags, parading and the past. Mark Devenport reports, with Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness' comments. The DUP has criticised the documentary on Ian Paisley shown last night. Film report with Ian Paisley's comments on discrimination in Northern Ireland in the 1960s. Then a vox pop of Ballymena and SDLP councillor Declan O'Loan's comments. Then DUP statement. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10120
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6562



Date Broadcast:
Wed 15th Jan 2014
Duration:
9 mins 46 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then dissident republican Gavin Coyle from Omagh is sentenced to 10 years for possessing guns and explosives at Ardboe, Co Tyrone. He was caught in the follow-up raids by the PSNI following the murder of PSNI Constable Ronan Kerr in April 2011. Film report on arms haul, with police now saying that they know who made and planted the bomb along with ACC Drew Harris' comments. In the House of Commons the DUP's Nigel Dodds accuses Sinn Fein of lacking political leadership and 'wallowing in murder' as DUP/Sinn Fein relations become increasingly strained after the Haas talks. Film report from Martina Purdy on verbal attacks and counter-attacks over recent days, including Sammy Wilson's complaint about biased policing regarding the handling of Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly's recent confrontation with a police jeep in north Belfast. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6572



Date Broadcast:
Thu 16th Jan 2014
Duration:
10 mins 29 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Polish families homes attacked in east Belfast. Film report on racist attacks with interview with householder Anna Bloch, the DUP councillor Gavin Robinson condemns the attack. Lurgan republican Martin Corry (63) has been released with stringent bail conditions after spending 4 years in jail without a trial or being charged. Film report reviews the case. He was originally jailed in 1973 for the murder of two RUC officers, then released on licence in 1992, then re-arrested in 2010 following an order from Northern Ireland Secretary of State Sean Woodward, who said that he was a risk to the public, but no evidence was produced. Current strict bail conditions outlined. Then reaction from Republican Sinn Fein, then from Sinn Fein's Jennifer McCann. A Council of Europe report says that development and promotion of the Irish language has been obstructed by hostile attitudes in Stormont. Film report from Tracy Magee on the damning report, with reaction from Irish Primary School Principal Fionnguala McCotter. Then in the studio Janette Millar, the Chief Executive of Pobal, an umbrella group for Irish language issues, supports the Council of Europe report in her interview, which criticises Westminster and Stormont. (Thurs 6pm)
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6573



Date Broadcast:
Thu 16th Jan 2014
Duration:
33 mins 44 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Mark Carruthers begins by interviewing Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness on his opinions on the unionist parties reaction to the Haas report. He says that unionist parties are dancing to the tune of extremists and gives Mark Carruthers his unvarnished thoughts on the unionist stance. Carruthers begins by asking how useful Tuesday's five party leaders meeting was. McGuinness says that it was useful in exploring if they can make a serious attempt at moving forward. He wanted to explore the unionist objections to the report with them and not the 348 individual findings contained in the report as he wants to avoid a time-wasting exercise. He says that unionist extremists are the elephant in the room. He refers to them as the people promoting conflict on the streets. He compares that to his and his party's stance towards dissident republicans in recent years. He says that he expects unionist politicians to condemn unionist attacks on the PSNI unreservedly. McGuinness says he tells it as it is. He says that some unionists, off the record, have told him that in the city of Belfast the UVF, the PUP and the Orange Order are one and the same, and that they are hostile to the peace process in recent years. He refers to the DUP's Nigel Dodds' comments about Sinn Fein 'wallowing in the filth of murder', which was in reference to the Sinn Fein parade in Castlederg in August. McGuinness points out that nobody was injured in Castlederg, no stones thrown and no PSNI officers were injured, yet for 18 months in Belfast extreme unionists have tried to drag everyone back into the past. During those 18 months he says he never heard one unionist MP or MLA point out criticisms of those involved in the street violence. It was left to a former Lord Mayor of Belfast, Gavin Robinson. He lists the discomforts he has faced for attacking dissident republicans who want to drag us back to the past. He needs to see similar leadership from unionists, but they have stood back and only watched. Mark Carruthers says that unionists would say that they have always called for peaceful, lawful flag protests and condemned street violence. In relation to Haas McGuinness says that we need agreement and that compromise is the key theme in flags, parading and the past. He lists the Sinn Fein position on each item. He says that they didn't get what they wanted but list the compromises that they made on each issue. He said that Sinn Fein is totally committed to finding a solution on each issue, but that it must be led by the five party leaders and not delegated out. McGuinness says that he is fed up hearing that the public are fed up with their politicians. He says that this is an opportunity to change that. He says that he wants to see Secretary of State Theresa Villiers chairing meentings. He thanks Megan O'Sullivan and Richard Haas for their efforts. He would like it done for St Patrick's Day and their trip to the USA. Next video report examines the issue of co-opting councillors. Since the last council election 50 councillors have been co-opted onto councils. Mark Carruthers wonders if this is not un-democratic and should new councillors not have to stand in a by-election? Gareth Gordon's film investigates the process in Newry and Mourne, where older Sinn Fein members are being replaced by younger members. Former Sinn Fein member, now an Independent, Davy Hyland gives his opinion, which is rejected by Sinn Fein MP Conor Murphy. The DUP has replaced 26 councillors across Northern Ireland. Three of them have been replaced by their sons, and two by their wives. The UUP's Paul Michael criticises the DUP's Trevor Clarke for selecting his wife to replace him in Antrim. The DUP's Peter Weir defends his party's action. Historian Henry Bell talks about options to using co-options. In the next section Mark Carruthers examines the subject of organ donation in Northern Ireland, and the two competing bills being proposed by the UUP's Joanne Dobson and the DUP's Alister Ross. Carruthers details the difference between the two bills, then the two politicians debate the issue in the studio. Is the Ross bill designed to torpedo the Dobson bill, as commentator Joe Brolly claims? After this discussion the commentators Professor Rick Wilford from Queens University, Belfast and Ulster University's Deirdre Heenan discuss the Martin McGuinness interview and his 'UVF/PUP/Orange Order are one and the same' comment, and his call for unionists to give leadership over these elements and also his call for a deadline for the party leader talks. They also comment on Paisley's remarks on civil rights, Bloody Sunday etc in a BBC documentary. Rick Wilford is critical of his selective memory. (Thus)
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6574



Date Broadcast:
Mon 20th Jan 2014
Duration:
59 mins 57 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Paisley: From Genesis to Revelation: Part2
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Eamon Maillie continues his conversation with Ian Paisley Sr. Tonight's discussion largely deals with his removal from the Free Presbyterian Church as Moderator and Minister at the Martyrs Memorial church. Paisley talks about the conspiracy to get rid of him both in his church and within the DUP after he agreed to go into power-sharing with Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness. The first item discussed however is Paisley recalling how he met his wife Eileen in 1950, and how she was special to him. Eileen recalls her first impression of him and of his preaching. Then Eamon Maillie returns to the politics of 1999 and asks Paisley about his opposition to the Trimble/Mallon power-sharing Executive, even though he nominated Peter Robinson and Nigel Dodds as ministers in the Executive. Film clip shown. However the DUP refused to co-operate with Sinn Fein or attend Executive meetings. The decommissioning issue was crippling the Executive and eroding David Trimble's authority within the UUP, and had allowed Paisley to ridicule him. Film clip of a verbal street confrontation shown, the Eamon Maillie asks him to explain his opposition to Trimble at that time. Paisley calls Trimble a weakling on all of the issues. In 2003 the DUP emerged as the largest party, while support for Sinn Fein also increased at the expense of the SDLP. London and Dublin now realised that Ian Paisley could no longer be ignored. Ian Paisley recalls those election results and Eileen Paisley recalls discussing the possibility of making peace with Sinn Fein as their vote wasn't going away. She says she knew that they would lose friends by doing this but thought that the troubles would last another 30 years if peace wasn't made. In autumn 2004 the British and Irish governments called the five parties together for talks at Leeds Castle in an attempt to stabilise devolution. PIRA decommissioning was top of the agenda. Blair and Paisley got on well, and both had a common interest in religion. Paisley recalls his religious conversations with Blair, whose grandmother was a Paisley supporter from Donegal, and had told him not to marry a Catholic. Blair married a Catholic and then became a Catholic. Paisley recalls Blair telling him he was becoming a Catholic and Paisley telling him he was a fool. Film clip of Paisley at the end of the Leeds Castle talks, and his comments on PIRA decommissioning. He wanted photographic evidence and his own witness to the decommissioning process. In a speech in Ballymena he says that the PIRA will 'need to wear sackcloth and ashes'. Paisley recalls this speech. In December 2005 the PIRA stole £26 million from the Northern Bank and in January 2005 republicans killed Robert McCartney in the Markets area. In September 2005 the PIRA finally addressed the decommissioning issue. Film clip of General John de Chastelain's TV conference of decommissioning shown. Father Alec Reid and the Reverend Harold Good witnessed the decommissioning process. Paisley recalls meeting them about decommissioning, and taking them at their word. However, before going in to government with Sinn Fein he insisted that they publically support the rule of law and the police service. This time talks were held in St Andrews in Scotland. Film clip shown. Sinn Fein held a special conference on support policing, and Paisley ceased talking about 'smashing' Sinn Fein. He recalls those days and his thinking at the time. He also reads a prepared statement of what the 'deal' was about, and why he moved forward. He denies that he just wanted to be First Minister. He answers questions on the criticisms that he faced at the time, and Eileen recalls the criticisms from within. Their first fall-out was with their long-time friend Desmond Boal QC. Eileen recalls their last conversation. Within the Free Presbyterian church opposition was growing, and there was heated debate within Presbery meetings in 2007. Paisley recalls the storm in the church at the time over power-sharing. He rejects that he chose power over the church. The Reverend Ivan Foster was one of his biggest critics. Film clip shown, the Paisley recalls Ivan Foster's comment to him, that they wanted him to cease being moderator of the church. In September 2007 Moderator elections split the church. Eileen recalls her advice to Ian to stay on as Moderator. He recalls the discussion that night. He offered to resign, and explains why, that it was to protect the church. Kyle Paisley says that the Paisley's felt betrayed. Ian decided to go in January 2008, and insists that he was not drummed out. Then Eileen recalls the aftermath of the Presbyterian Church meeting. Kyle Paisley says that the majority of what was said that night was pure sectarianism. Ian agrees with Eileen that they were betrayed by friends. Politically, in 2007, many within the DUP opposed sharing power with Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness. No party conference was held. With Paisley in his 80s, senior party officials began preparing for Ian Paisley's departure. Eileen recalls a nasty attitude against Ian and an undercurrent against him. Paisley and McGuinness were often seen together laughing and enjoying each other's company. In February 2008 DUP Advisor Timothy Johnston gave Paisley a survey of DUP MLAs, containing 7 questions on Paisley's leadership. Eamon Maillie talks to Paisley about the survey challenges to him. Paisley says that he felt like he was being put on trial. He says that he didn't ask Timothy Johnston to conduct a survey on leadership. Timothy Johnston's statement is read out. Paisley said that it was done in the interests of Peter Robinson, who wanted rid of him. He says that there is a lot of people who are only in politics for their own ends. The discussion on the motivation for the survey continues. Paisley says that anything that was done to get him out was done behind backs. He also recalls the attacks on his son, Ian Jr, by Peter Robinson, who he says couldn't even hold on to his east Belfast seat. Eileen also comments on the 'sleaze' within the Robinson family, and not the Paisley's. Ian says that they are afraid of his son. He recalls his hurt at the survey document. Then Eileen gives her view of the document, saying she wanted to shove it down Timothy Johnston's throat. She praises Ian and Martin McGuinness for working together and getting on well, and rejects the 'Chuckle Brothers' slur. Eileen says that Peter Robinson just wanted Ian's job. In February 2008 at Stormont Castle Nigel Dodds told Ian that they wanted him gone by Friday, but Peter Robinson saying that he could stay on for a couple of months. Paisley recalls the exchange and who was in the room. Robinson and Dodds deny any such meeting ever took place, and that Dr Paisley's departure was a matter for him. Eileen calls Dodds a 'cheeky sod' and says that Robinson and Dodds 'assassinated' Ian, who announced his resignation in March 2008. In his speech he says that he wasn't pressurised. TV clip shown. He tells Eamon Maillie that he didn't want to split the party, which is why he didn't oppose Robinson/Dodds. Paisley is asked to explain his feelings now about Peter Robinson. In the autumn of 2011 arrangements were being made to have Paisley removed from the Martyrs Memorial church. A letter to him from seven Elders is shown. Eileen recalls her reaction to how they dropped him after 65 years of preaching, then Ian recalls his hurt and the heartbreak. Eileen says that the congregation were in tears on his last day. No Paisley will now enter the Martyrs Memorial church. Paisley recalls his farewell speech, and comments on why he won't return to the church. Took weeks later Paisley took ill and was placed on a life support machine. Eileen recalls how ill he was for four days, but pulled through.
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
532
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6575



Date Broadcast:
Tue 21st Jan 2014
Duration:
3 mins 29 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Headlines, then the DUP have rejected Ian Paisley's account of how and why he stepped down as party leader and First Minister in 2008. Film report on DUP statement and its timeline. They deny issuing an ultimatum and say that he requested the survey. In Ballymena a vox pop of local residents gives their views. In court the mother of murder victim Philip Strickland said she was aware of a UVF threat against him after a fight in a bar. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6576



Date Broadcast:
Tue 21st Jan 2014
Duration:
1 mins 39 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Paul Clark interviews DUP Health Minister Edwin Poots about last night's programme on Ian Paisley but he refuses to answer any questions directly. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10130
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6577



Date Broadcast:
Wed 22nd Jan 2014
Duration:
11 mins 12 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott has announced that he will retire this summer. Film report on his five years in the job with Vincent Kearney. He was the object of intense scrutiny from day one in the job. Events on the street and reminders of the past were never far away. The dissident republican threat made it impossible to introduce a softer policing profile. The murder of Constable Ronan Kerr was a reminder of that threat. He did secure an extra £250 million in funds to combat the dissident republican threat. Another success was the G8 summit, but he was criticized by both unionists and nationalists over the handling of the flags protest, and his defence of the HET and its chief Dave Fox angered many on the Policing Board. Vincent Kearney says that it is possible that Matt Baggott saw the writing on the wall and knew that he wouldn't get a two year extension to his contract. Next report from Gareth Gordon gauges political reaction to his announcement from the UUP's Ross Hussey, the DUP's Jonathan Craig, Sinn Fein's Pat Sheehan, the SDLP's Dolores Kelly and Alliance Justice Minister David Ford. Then in the studio Vincent Kearney gives his views on potential replacements and the rule that to get the job you have to have served as an Assistant Chief Constable in a force outside of Northern Ireland for two years. That rules out Deputy Chief Constable Judith Gillespie, as well as Assistant Chief Constables Will Kerr and Drew Harris. The only current PSNI possibility is Assistant Chief Constable George Hamilton and Mark Gilmore, who is currently Chief Constable in Yorkshire. At Belfast courts at the trial of Jimmy Seales (55) for the murder of Philip Strickland in January 2012 outside Comber evidence was given by Ian Weir against his father, Jimmy Seales. Film report, then other High Court news on bail applications. (Wed)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6578



Date Broadcast:
Thu 23rd Jan 2014
Duration:
11 mins 44 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then a film report on the escalation of joyriding in west Belfast, with a film clip of death drivers on the streets on New Year's Eve, then Terry Quinn of the Falls Road Residents' Association comments on an increase in events on the streets since then. Last night in Albert Street fire crews were attacked as they attempted to put out a burning car. Then Sinn Fein's Fra McCann calls on the PSNI to do more. PSNI statement released. In Newtownabbey the council has banned a play called The Complete Word of God, saying that it is blasphemous and anti-Christian. Film report with DUP councillor Robert Hill's views, supported by UUP Mayor Fraser Agnew. Then Sinn Fein councillor Gerard O'Reilly calls it censorship at its worst. Then a council statement saying that 150 out of 800 tickets had been sold. In Whitehead a police search found firearms and explosives and a 51 year old man was arrested. At the Philip Strickland murder trial in Belfast Jimmy Seales (55) and Stephen McGaughey are accused of murder. Ian Weir, the son of Jimmy Seales, was cross-examined by defence lawyers today. Film report. The DUP's Peter Robinson today gives his support to Ian Paisley Jr after his father and mother gave a critical interview about Peter Robinson and his family in a recent BBC programme Paisley: Genesis to Revelation. Film report from Ken Reid with Peter Robinson's comments, the Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness says that he is still friendly with Ian Paisley Sr and still keeps in contact. He also talks about the 5 party talks on Haas, where Peter Robinson disagrees on the time option. (Thurs 6pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6579



Date Broadcast:
Fri 24th Jan 2014
Duration:
7 mins 41 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In Derry courts Shane Frain (26) and Conor Clarence (24) trial begins on the charge of causing the death of PSNI Constable Phillipa Reynolds in February 2013. Both men were drunk. Film report. 8,500 RUC men have been awarded compensation for hearing loss whilst using RUC rifle ranges. The total bill could be £135 million. Film report with the policemen's solicitor Dorcas Crawford's defence of their court action. Then Policing Board member Pat Sheehan (Sinn Fein) calls it a 'gravy train culture'. Then award claimant retired Inspector Alan Mains rejects this view. MLAs have been updating the Register of Interests giving details of family members that they employ. Film report from Martina Purdy with the details. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6580



Date Broadcast:
Sat 25th Jan 2014
Duration:
53 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Loyalists are being blamed for firing gunshots at a house in Larne. Film report with Sinn Fein MLA Oliver McMullan's reaction. (Sat 5pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6581



Date Broadcast:
Tue 28th Jan 2014
Duration:
3 mins 57 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the PSNI say that they have made a DNA breakthrough in the 1999 murder of PIRA informer Eamon Collins outside Newry. Film report with Detective Inspector Peter Montgomery's comments on the DNA profile and review of Eamon Collins' case. (Mon 6pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6582



Date Broadcast:
Tue 28th Jan 2014
Duration:
6 mins 19 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then Alliance Justice Minister David Ford has angered both the DUP and Sinn Fein over changes to the rules for appointing a new chief constable of the PSNI. Film report from Vincent Kearney with the DUP's Jonathan Craig's views, then Sinn Fein's Pat Sheehan. Then in the Assembly David Ford stands by his rule changes. In relation to the New Year's Eve car chases the PSNI say they have spoken to a 12 year old boy who was involved. The ban on the Newtownabbey theatre play about the Bible has been lifted following a meeting of Newtownabbey council. Film report says that ticket sales have soared, with all 800 tickets now sold. Austin Tichenor of the the theatre company comments, then vox pop of locals on the play then the views of local playwright Gary Mitchell. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6583



Date Broadcast:
Thu 30th Jan 2014
Duration:
4 mins 52 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Headlines, the Irish Taoiseach Enda Kenny has met with the families of those killed by British Army paratroopers in Ballymurphy in August 1971. Film report from Shane Harrison. The families, accompanied by the SDLP and the Alliance Party, want an independent panel to investigate the killings. In Derry, police investigating the killing of 13 unarmed civilians on Bloody Sunday in January 1972 are looking for witness statements from 1000 witnesses who gave statements to the Saville Inquiry as those original statements cannot be used in a criminal investigation. The Stormont Executive is to meet to discuss Justice Minister David Ford's (Alliance) decision to change the rules for appointing the new Chief Constable of the PSNI. Film report with David Ford's comments and Mark Devenport's analysis. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6584



Date Broadcast:
Fri 31st Jan 2014
Duration:
7 mins 3 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Last night in east Belfast four PSNI officers were hurt after loyalists rioted over the presence of PIRA bomber Patrick Magee at an event in the Skainos Centre. Film report with reaction from community worker Jim Wilson (PUP) and then the event organizer the Reverend Leslie Carroll comments. 14 months ago Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness was at the centre opening it and there were no protests. Film clip shown, then the UUP's Michael Copeland comments on what has changed in east Belfast, the Naomi Long (Alliance) gives her views. At a west Belfast interface on the Springfield Road there were minor sectarian clashes. Film report. A teacher at the Belfast Boys' Model School in north Belfast who is a Sinn Fein councillor in Lurgan has been subjected to on-line abuse. Film report. With foreign nationals here subject to racist attacks (12 so far this year), a charity, Bryson House, has called for the Stormont Assembly to introduce a racial equality strategy for Northern Ireland. Film report with Bryson House's Jo Marley's comments. Then Belfast Lord Mayor Mairtin O'Muilleoir's comments on recent racial attacks in Belfast. (Fri 6.30)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
531
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6585



Date Broadcast:
Mon 3rd Feb 2014
Duration:
7 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then Denis Bradley and Robin Eames, authors of the Eames/Bradley report on dealing with the past in 2005 have warned that it will be a tragedy if a deal is not done on the issues of dealing with the past. Film report from Sharon O'Neill with comments from both men. The Orange Order has distanced itself from comments made by a senior member, George Chiddick, in Belfast that Protestants shouldn't learn Irish as it is part of the republican agenda. Film report from an Irish class in Protestant east Belfast where Linda Ervine says that the classes are getting bigger, then Orange Order statement on Chiddick's remarks, then Sinn Fein's Niall O'Donnaghaile's comments. Next Ken Reid reveals that Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly was invited to Hydebank Young Offenders Centre to talk about his new book on the 1983 Maze Prison escape, but senior officials cancelled his visit. He also gives the cost of policing loyalist flags protest at camp Twaddell in north Belfast as £7 million. (Mon 6pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
532
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6586



Date Broadcast:
Mon 3rd Feb 2014
Duration:
9 mins 41 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Exclusive in-depth interview with Denis Bradley and Robin Eames, authors of the Eames/Bradley report, on what they think of the Haas report and what they feel that our politicians need to do to deal with coming to terms with the past in Northern Ireland and the dangers the fear for Northern Irish society if the past is not dealt with. The interview begins with Sharon O'Neill asking both men if they believe that the Eames/Bradley proposals were the right thing at the wrong time? They point out that what they were saying then is surfacing now. Film clip shows the angry scenes at the launch of the Eames/Bradley report and both men recall their reactions to the skirmishes, but they feel that many people with reservations back then now believe that they got it right. Knowing what they know now they are asked what they would have done differently. Denis Bradley feels that the two governments need to be involved more, and pay for it. He feels that that's why the Haas talks failed too. Both men comments on our local politicians efforts over the last five years. They feel it would be a tragedy if a solution is not found, and that politics will be damaged here. They say that they want our politicians to be honest and not be always looking over their shoulders at what the electorate think. They say to get on with it and do it soon. Then they outline their fears if no deal is done. Denis Bradley highlights the dangers in Belfast. He also says that victims' groups having to go to courts, tribunals, judges and institutions won't work well because they are hampered by the past. Numbers voting will fall. Robin Eames says he fears what this is doing to our new generation, and that it will affect people's ability to have a broad vision for Northern Ireland. Then both men outline what is at stake for Northern Ireland if this issue is not dealt with. Politics is a substitute for civil war says Denis Bradley, and society could drift back to that. Eames says that a stable is at stake, as is co-existence here. (Mon 10.30)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
532
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6587



Date Broadcast:
Tue 4th Feb 2014
Duration:
3 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the DUP's Peter Robinson says that Protestants are free to learn any language they choose. He was responding to senior Orangemen George Chiddick's comments that Protestants should not learn Irish. Film report. In the courts Judge S Treacey has rejected a claim by Raymond McCord and NIPSA that the PSNI should not re-hire ex-RUC men who retired to work within the PSNI. Film report from Vincent Kearney gives details of the judge's comments in both cases. Then reaction from NIPSA's Ryan McKinney and then solicitor Padraig O'Muirigh. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
532
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6588



Date Broadcast:
Tue 4th Feb 2014
Duration:
44 mins 31 secs
Broadcast Company:
Sky Group
Channel:
Sky One
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Ross Kemp's Extreme World:
Programme Title:
Belfast
Description:
Ross Kemp comes over from London to see for himself events in Belfast in July 2013 around the Orange march past the nationalist Ardoyne area. His previous knowledge of the troubles here is limited, as he admits himself. The Programme begins with him giving a summary of events to date. Then a brief series of film clips of the Ardoyne parades with the differing viewpoints of marchers and residents. He also talks to a dissident republican councillor in Derry. He wants to know what it is that makes so many people unwilling to let go of the past. In a taxi with Norman Reilly, a Protestant, he is given a tour of the flags and murals in loyalist and republican working class areas. The taxi driver is his tour guide. The Falls/Shankill peace wall surprises Ross Kemp as he explores both sides of it. He visits Bombay Street, and the republican mural where they meet a Catholic taxi driver. All three have a conversation about the number of peace walls and the lack of trust. Then Ross Kemp heads to Derry to make contact with dissident republicans. Firstly he goes to the main PSNI station to meet Chief Superintendent Stephen Martin to find out the level of threat posed by dissident republicans. The various groups in existence are explained to him and he is told that the threat is serious. The murder of Andrew Allen (24) in 2012 is profiled. His girlfriend and his mother recall his death by dissident republicans, then Ross Kemp goes on a PSNI house raid to watch the operation. Two men are arrested. After a week Gary Donnelly of the 32 County Sovereignty Committee, a dissident republican group, agrees to talk to Ross Kemp about why they are unhappy with the Good Friday Agreement and why an armed resistance to Britain is continuing. Ross Kemp reveals how in broad terms the Good Friday Agreement ended troubles violence. Back in Belfast its marching season and Ross Kemp reviews the flags protests in Belfast over the decision by Belfast City Council to only fly the union flag on designated days, and the violence that came with the protests. Loyalists felt that the decision undermined their British identity. Ross Kemp meets the Shankill Protestant Boys Band at a practice session. The play Minstrel Boy for him. Gary Lenaghan, who set the band up in 1980, talks about the band, the situation in Northern Ireland now and what he feels about the 'culture war', and Catholics' views of the band and his view of the band that they are a cultural expression. Ross Kemp visits boys guarding a Shankill Road bonfire and hears their views on the bonfire and their heritage. Then a vox pop of loyalists shows their fear of a republican take-over. On the nationalist side the parades are seen a Protestant supremacy. In Ardoyne Ann Robinson gives a nationalist view of marches. Then 2012 footage of the violence is shown and the role of the Parades Commission is explained. This year the loyalist return parade has been banned. Ross Kemp explains what that means as a minor riot erupts behind him. Loyalist residents tell Ross Kemp their views and then the eleventh night bonfire is lit. Davy Hagan and Gary Lenaghan describe their anger at the return parade ban. Bonfires are explained by Ross Kemp. Then the next day over 550 marches will take place, with 4000 police officers on duty. Ross Kemp talks to Detective Inspector Graham Dallas, the PSNI Commander, on the task that he faces. A map of the area and the parade's route is shown. Catholic and Protestant residents are on the streets. The PSNI stop the parade as it has 500 supporters with it. An Orangeman expresses his anger to Ross Kemp. Then the march proceeds without supporters. After the main parade the PSNI wait at Woodvale Street to stop the return March past Ardoyne. A crowd gathers, the parade is stopped and violence erupts. Helicopter film clip shown. Water cannon enters the area. Film of riot shown. PSNI injured, a mob sings the Sash, baton rounds are fired, Ross Kemp comments. As the evening goes on crowds are still rioting. At 11pm it is still going on. Police chief comments. Ross Kemp reviews the financial costs. The riots lasted four days and cost £28 million. Ross Kemp summarises what he has learned in his time in Northern Ireland.
DVD No.
D10140
Tape No.
532
Country of Origin:
Record No.
6589



Date Broadcast:
Wed 5th Feb 2014
Duration:
6 mins 49 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In court Sean McVeigh (33) has been charged with the murder of Prison Officer David Black (52) outside Lurgan in 2012 as he drove to work in Maghaberry prison. Film report with details of the case against Sean McVeigh. In east Belfast the PSNI raided houses connected to a UVF crime gang in 'Operation Mores', but no arrests were made. DUP councillor Gavin Robinson comments, the Alliance's Chris Lyttle's views. Film report on Operation Mores success to date against low-level criminals. A UN report from the Committee on the Rights of Child has criticized the Catholic Church in Ireland. Conor MacAuley gives the details of the report and its criticisms with the Vatican's response. (Wed 6.30)
DVD No.
D10150
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6590



Date Broadcast:
Wed 5th Feb 2014
Duration:
30 mins 36 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The Nolan Show
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In the studio Steven Nolan discusses the issues around loyalist/Orange Order parades and the current Camp Twaddell protest, its cost and the on-going violence around the parades issue at Ardoyne. The programme begins with a film report reviewing recent events around parades trouble, which has saw 400 people arrested. Then in the studio the DUP's William Humphrey is asked to explain where this loyalist anger is coming from. He replies that their cultural rights are being undermined by a cultural war led by Sinn Fein. He also adds that the union is safe and that this isn't about politics. He says that Sinn Fein/nationalism has been defeated and that Sinn Fein has now turned its war towards demonizing the Orange Order. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly rejects the cultural war allegation. He points out that Belfast's electorate is 50/50 yet 95% of the regalia in City Hall is unionist. He also highlights unionism's rejection of Irishness and the Irish language. Gerry Kelly then explains what he means by gaining equality on these issues. He doesn't mean taking down unionist symbols and going 50/50. He says that if they are there they are there. When challenged about how important Orange culture really is in the minds of Northern Irish citizens William points out the crowds at the 12th July parades. Gerry Kelly points out the remarks of Orangeman George Chiddick on the Irish language. Both men then give their views on why recent talks in Ardoyne failed. The PUP's Winston Irvine is then asked how important Orange parades really are compared to issues such as health and education. He raises the money spent on dealing with dissident republicans as a waste of money on a much wider scale, they are a much bigger threat than loyalism. Gerry Kelly questions the relevance of this point to tonight's discussion, and criticizes the position of Camp Twaddell. Then people in the audience give their views on the Orange camp protests. Steven Nolan asks where is Peter Robinson's leadership? William Humphreys reverts to defending the union flag, especially in the Haas talks, he defends peaceful protests and ignores questions about costs. Winston Irvine says we haven't talked about all the causes, and that Sinn Fein haven't brought all republicans along a peaceful route. Gerry Kelly and he debate this point angrily. Steven Nolan then shows a film clip of Camp Twaddell last night and shows how many police jeeps were at the scene. Then he mentions the Ross Kemp show on Sky TV last night and how it portrayed Belfast to the rest of the UK. Riot clips from the TV programme are shown. Then loyalist protester Jamie Bryson, who is in the audience, blames Sinn Fein for all of the trouble as he says that for them the Belfast Agreement was part of a process and not an end. He says that Sinn Fein's message is that violence pays. Steven Nolan says that he is obsessing about flags and ignoring issues such as health and education. Then in the studio Jude Collins says that the Orange Order is an anti-Catholic organization. He sees their 4000 yearly marches as coat trailing and asks how this is contributing to the unity of our society. He also alleges that unionist leaders have abandoned the Protestant working class. William Humphreys rejects this and says that the Orange Order is not anti-Catholic. He also says that as a democrat he accepts election results and that Sinn Fein have a mandate, and that the Northern Assembly is a mandatory coalition, not a voluntary one. Gerry Kelly highlights Sinn Fein's strong electoral success. Gerry Kelly and William Humphrey exchange in a heated exchange across the table, shouting at each other. Stephen Nolan then ends this section of the programme and invites calls from the public on what they've heard. Margaret phones in, then Steven Nolan switches to a music piece.
DVD No.
D10150
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6591



Date Broadcast:
Thu 6th Feb 2014
Duration:
17 mins 30 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then it's one year on from when the Unionist Forum was formed during the flags protests. It was the brainchild of DUP leader Peter Robinson of the DUP and the UUP's Mike Nesbitt, who wanted to replace street protest with dialogue. Paul Clark introduces a film report from Jean Loughrey on what the Forum has achieved and asked does it still exist? It begins with a film clip from one year ago and its inaugural meeting, with Peter Robinson's comments. Last summer Jim Allister left the Forum, saying that it was designed to stop the flags protest. Recently UKIP's David McNarry also left. Then east Belfast community worker Jim Wilson (PUP) comments on his vision of what the Forum should have been working on besides just flags. Shankill youth worker Thomson Harrison says that he thought that the Forum initially was a good idea but was disillusioned now. Then May Blood says that the Forum has had no impact that she has heard of. Back in east Belfast a vox pop of local people is conducted to see what, if anything, they know about the Forum and its work on flags. Then the PUP's John Kyle, who is chair of one of the Forum's working groups gives his assessment. He feels that the Forum was distracted by the Haas talks. Then commentator Alex Kane says that the Forum is dead, it's just not buried yet. Then John Kyle. Then Jim Wilson comments on whether it is dead. Back in the studio David McNarry (UKIP), Danny Kinahan (UUP and Jeffrey Donaldson (DUP) discuss the issue, starting with David McNarry's comments on why he left, which was a lack of contact over seven months. Danny Kinahan says that it was needed but that the Haas process overtook it. Then Jeffrey Donaldson says that they still want the Forum to proceed as he feels that we can't take the union for granted. David McNarry outlines the Forum's failings on flags and parades. Jeffrey Donaldson says that he was engaging with other parties during the Haas talks. Danny Kinahan says that loyalists and unionists should be working together but David McNarry says that the DUP have lost the people's trust, which Jeffrey Donaldson rejects. Ahead of Sinn Fein's Ard Fheis this weekend, Tracey Magee interviews the party President Gerry Adams. She begins by asking him whether, due to a fall in his personal ratings, it is time for him to step down. Adams says that he is 'first among equals' and that the party makes its own decisions, not him. He comments on his brother's case, then on Haas. He says that Unionists didn't stretch themselves, and that they only wanted to sort out parades and that unionist leaders let down the electorate. He comments on the Executive's work and the McGuinness/Robinson relationship, and says that unionists don't want to be in a power-sharing relationship. (Thurs 10.30)
DVD No.
D10150
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6592



Date Broadcast:
Fri 7th Feb 2014
Duration:
7 mins 30 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
TG4
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Ar Fud Na Tire
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
In Irish with English subtitles, a section of this programme looks at how an Irish language class has started up in loyalist east Belfast, an area where the Irish language is often considered as an enemy symbol. Film clip shows loyalist murals, then in the Skainos Centre the Irish language class is shown at work and the driving force behind it all, Linda Ervine comments. Then the class's Irish teacher Mathiu O hEachaidh comments on his role. They have seven classes running there at the moment attended by 100 people, along with a family class attended by 20 people. Most of the people attending are from the Protestant/Loyalist community. Some were in the army. Andy Hall profiled speaking Irish. Then Belfast Lord Mayor Mairtin O'Muilleoir comments on the significance of the classes. Linda's brother in law was David Ervine, former UVF prisoner and PUP leader. She comments on the Irish class. The teacher comments that you can still learn Irish and go to marches. Mairtin O'Muilleoir hopes that the Irish language can be a bridge between the two communities in Belfast.
DVD No.
D10150
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6593



Date Broadcast:
Sat 8th Feb 2014
Duration:
58 mins 45 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC2 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The Conference:
Programme Title:
Sinn Fein
Description:
Mark Carruthers introduces live coverage from the Sinn Fein annual conference in Wexford and Gerry Adams speech to the conference. After his introduction Mark Carruthers talks to Queens University Professor Rick Wilford about what has been a challenging twelve months for Gerry Adams and Sinn Fein, with Gerry Adams subjected to a lot of political criticism over issues such as the 'Disappeared', as seen in a BBC documentary earlier this year, and also personal criticism relating to the conviction of his brother Liam Adams for sexual abuse. Rick Wilford outlines how the party will take this opportunity to rally round Adams. He guesses what Adams will say in his speech in relation to the north, the Haas talks etc. Then, live from Wexford, BBC Political Editor Mark Devenport gives his assessment of the mood at the conference over the last few days. He says that it has been positive and expectant. He refers to the appearance of councillor Catherine Seeley, who had been the subject of an on-line sectarian intimidation campaign after it was revealed that she taught in the Boys' Model School in north Belfast. Martin McGuinness says that unionist politicians ignored it. Mark Devenport gives his views on what he thinks Gerry Adams will include in his speech relating to issues both north and south. Next Mark Carruthers covers Martin McGuinness' speech earlier at the conference. Film clip shown. In it he attacks the Orange Order and unionists for their fear of cultural equality, and lists a series of examples of this. He says that pro-Irish and pro-British need to be respected, and that no one culture or identity is more worthy than another. He highlights how events in Derry led the way in these challenges. He calls on unionists to lead from the front. He mentions his views on parades needing dialogue and respect. Again he highlights Derry's success in this respect. He then goes on to mention the sectarian campaign against councillor Catherine Seeley, who worked in the Boys' Model State School in north Belfast and he criticizes the unionist parties responses to this. The on stage Catherine Seeley praises the pupils of the Boys Model School and talks about general educational matters. Then Mark Devenport interviews Martina Anderson, a Euro candidate, and Senator David Cullen from Waterford. Martina Anderson gives her views on what unionists should have done in the Catherine Seeley case. She denies that Sinn Fein is using the case for political purposes. Then she comments on the Haas talks, and the compromises that Sinn Fein will accept. She wants the other parties to show the same courage as Sinn Fein. Then David Cullen gives his assessment on Sinn Fein's election chances in the republic and gives his views on the current economic situation, which is no better. There is no recovery, he says. Then he comments on the north/south connector situation. Back in the studio Rick Wilford comments on Martina Anderson's European election chances, and their chances in the upcoming new council elections. He feels that the Sinn Fein vote in the north has plateaued. Mark Carruthers then shows an extract from John O'Dowd's speech on where he calls on the DUP to lead from the front. He highlights the uncomfortable journeys Sinn Fein have made to achieve peace. In a power-sharing Executive he says that the DUP need to treat Sinn Fein as equals, that the Stormont of old is gone and that the new Stormont is built on equality. Then Mark Devenport interviews Alex Maskey MLA about the welfare reform issue and how it affects Sinn Fein as an all-island party and keeping the same position both north and south. He says that Sinn Fein wants a change in DUP policy and that they will tackle cuts both north and south. He says that there will be no bedroom tax in the north. Then Rick Wilford's comments on Alex Maskey's views on welfare policies north and south. Then Gerry Adams arrives at the podium to a standing ovation. He opens with some words in Irish then welcomes friends of Sinn Fein from around the world. He mentions the family of Volunteer John Davey, whose anniversary is coming up and praises Father Alec Reid, the chaplain to the peace process and best wishes to John Downey in London and other on-the Runs (OTRs). He begins by criticizing Fine Gael and Labour and their broken promises, which he lists. He then lists their failings, with ten Irish people leaving the country every hour he claims, households in mortgage distress and water charges. He says that Sinn Fein resent the unfair way that the cuts are being done, calling the government arrogant. He criticizes Enda Kenny's attitude to calling emigration 'a desire to travel'. He calls for job creation to bring young people back home. He goes on to talk about cuts to the health service, then he criticizes the government over its failure to protect the Irish language and the arts. He also talks about the 'counter-revolutionaries' after 1916, and mentions Michael Collins, the toxic political culture that led to abuses of power in banks, the Church and the State. He says that Fine Gael and Fianna Fail were supported by the Labour Party in abuses of power and golden circles. He lists a series of scandals by name, and says that Sinn Fein will take on this toxic culture. In the north he says that Sinn Fein didn't impose water charges and invested in new-build schemes, protected payments to young people, no raise in tuition fees or introduction of prescription charges. He uses these examples to deny Fine Gael/Labour charges that Sinn Fein have no choice in decisions that are made He claims that northern issues like the Maze, an Irish Language Act and parades will be solved. Change will not be stopped. He mentions the Orange Order and offers to talk to them. He vows to protect the LGBT community, he calls for the left to come together with key policies to take on the Conservatives. He highlights Sinn Fein's budget proposals to protect workers and lists the policies. He claims that Fianna Fail will never again be the dominant force that it was. He says that Sinn Fein is a force in both parts of Ireland and highlights the record number of female councillors. He praises Catherine Seeley, and goes on to name and praise Sinn Fein's MEP candidates. Then he mentions the death of Nelson Mandela, a friend of Ireland and then talks about the Israel/Palestine peace process and calls on international bodies to do more. Sinn Fein opposes militarization in Europe. Adams says it is time to re-build. He lists proposals that he says will deliver for people and quotes Bobby Sands. 2014 is the year of change he claims. Speech ends with a standing ovation. Rick Wilford gives his analysis of the speech and its north/south balance.
DVD No.
D10150
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6594



Date Broadcast:
Sun 9th Feb 2014
Duration:
23 mins 22 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Sunday Politics
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers begins by referring to Sinn Fein's Ard Fheis in Wexford, then introduces a film report from Shane Harrison on the Wexford Conference begins with clips of Martin McGuinness' speech criticizing unionist leaders for failing to do a deal on flags, parading and the past at the Haas talks. He accuses unionist leaders of dancing to the Orange Order's tune. Then Sinn Fein European candidate Matt Carthy says that he feels that a deal can be done with the DUP. then Shane Harrison recalls recent media criticisms of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams in a recent BBC documentary 'The Disappeared' and also the questions over when he told the police that he knew that his brother was a child rapist. However this Sinn Fein conference rallied around Gerry Adams. Clip of Chairman Declan Kearney's speech defending Adams against the 'media campaign'. Then Sinn Fein councillor Niall O'Donnaghaile also defends Adams. Next Political Editor Mark Devenport interviews Gerry Adams, beginning with asking about Sinn Fein re-negotiating the Haas deal with the DUP, even though they said they would not do that. Adams says that the issues haven't gone away. He explains how it is difficult to be a unionist leader in this time of equality, a concept that is almost foreign to unionists he claims. Then he outlines how the political landscape has, and is, changed in Ireland. Sinn Fein will continue to engage with all sectors of society to achieve a compromise. Adams then comments on why Sinn Fein did not involve itself in the debate over the Scottish referendum. He says that thankfully the British Empire has been reduced to these islands, and the union is now conditional on the will of the people, and whatever happens in Scotland won't affect the argument against British rule in Northern Ireland. Then Adams answers a question on whether the next party President should be from the north or south, but he says that there is no competition for the President's job. Then in the studio former BBCNI Political Correspondent Denis Murray and commentator Susan McKay comment on the Ard Fheis, firstly on the north/south elements of Adams speech. Denis Murray says that the bulk of the speech was aimed at a southern audience, when for years it was all about the north. He also mentions his offer to reach out to the Orange tradition, but in the interview he calls flag protesters 'buck idiots'. Susan McKay says that she feels he is chasing growth in the south, but that his greatest appeal is to people who don't usually vote. She feels that Adams is damaged and that Mary Lou McDonald would have greater appeal. She says that he is hopeless on economic issues. In Dublin Ivan Lewis, the British Shadow Secretary of State is meeting Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore. He is interviewed by Mark Carruthers and is asked what he would do differently from the Tories in Northern Ireland if he was in charge. He replies that the peace process evolved because the British and Irish governments were heavily involved in all stages of the process. In recent times the Tories have had a lack of engagement he says, and that this has led to the failure to reach agreement in the Haas talks. He develops this point in three areas. He says that Labour would have played a more constructive role during the Haas talks and he criticizes Theresa Villiers for saying that there would be no resources available. He then talks about his upcoming meeting with the Ballymurphy Massacres relatives, and says he will then decide Labour's position on their call for an inquiry. Then Gareth Gordon looks back on the news of the week in 60 seconds in Northern Ireland. Then Denis Murray and Susan McKay comment on Ivan Lewis' criticisms of Tory minister Theresa Villiers no-involvement in the Haas process. (Sunday)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6595



Date Broadcast:
Mon 10th Feb 2014
Duration:
7 mins 25 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in Bangor two men have been shot and wounded. Security sources are blaming the east Belfast UVF. Film report from Whitehill estate in Bangor where one man was shot three times in the chest, the other shot in the leg. Then reaction from the DUP's Alex Easton and Tracy Morrow from the Whitehill Community Association. The PSNI have said that their investigation into the 1972 Claudy bombing that killed 9 people can't go any further without new evidence. Film report with old film clip of the aftermath with reaction from UUP councillor Mary Hamilton who was injured in the three car bomb blast. Catholic priest Fr James Chesney was suspected of being involved but no-one was ever charged. PSNI Assistant Chief Constable met the families. From Stormont Ken Reid comments on the DUP's Peter Robinson's reaction to the Sinn Fein ard fheis comments that unionists didn't condemn the intimidation of Sinn Fein councillor Catherine Seeley who taught in the Boys' Model School in north Belfast. Then Ken Reid talks about the economic impact of the failure to introduce welfare reform to Northern Ireland according to the DUP. He also gives his analysis of support for Gerry Adams at the Sinn Fein Ard Fheis. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6596



Date Broadcast:
Tue 11th Feb 2014
Duration:
7 mins 40 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
On the 25th anniversary of the murder of solicitor Pat Finucane in February 1989 his wife Geraldine gives an interview about her 25 year campaign for justice and the truth, which she pledges to continue. She talks about her husband and the effect of his murder by agents of the state, some of whom are still in the UDA. Then Prime Minister David Cameron apologises for the levels of collusion, but stops short of ordering an inquiry, a decision that is being challenged in the courts. Sharon O'Neill begins by asking about the effects of the killing and to describe her husband as a man and a husband, and family things. She recalls the slurs made against her husband in the beginning, saying they were attempts to deflect from the truth. She is determined that the truth will be told. Old film clips of Pat shown. She comments on her meeting with David Cameron in October 2011. It was a bad day for the family. Cameron's apology isn't enough because she still doesn't know the full truth. She recalls how in the beginning people wouldn't believe her when she alleged that it was collusion. They felt that she was clutching at straws. Now collusion is a term that everyone accepts. She says that Cameron's review choice wasn't the right path. She says that the Labour party have told her that if they are re-elected they will order an inquiry. In other news a device has been defused in Craigavon. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6597



Date Broadcast:
Thu 13th Feb 2014
Duration:
4 mins 16 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
New report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then Downing Street has blamed dissident republicans for sending letter bombs to British Army Career Advice Centres across England. Film report on seven letter bombs, two of which were posted from the Republic of Ireland. DUP MP Nigel Dodds gives his reaction. In Newry's Parkhead Crescent a PSNI search has found three nail bombs and ammunition following a pipe bomb attack in the area last night. Then brief report on the US purchase of the Republic's NAMA portfolio (tape ends early). (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
533
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6598



Date Broadcast:
Thu 13th Feb 2014
Duration:
44 mins 42 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
Channel 5
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
n.a.
Programme Title:
The Kidnapping of Shergar 1983
Description:
This documentary tells the story of the life and career of the derby winner Shergar, who was kidnapped and held for ransom by the PIRA in Ireland on 8/2/1983 from its stud. The horse was never seen again. Programme begins with Sunday Times Journalist Don McCleen's comments on how the Irish racing scene had improved in the 1970s and 1980s to match England's. Then Jonathan Irwin's comments. He was Managing Director of Goff's Bloodstock Sales in 1983, then Channel 4's racing commentator D Thompson's views. Irish-bred horses were considered top-class. The commentators explain why. The role of Charlie Haughey is profiled. He made income derived from stallions exempt from income tax. Then Vincent O'Brien in Tipperary, John Magnier and R Sykes roles explained with views from racing journalist Olviers on their new purchasing powers. Irish horses had success on foreign shores. The role of the billionaire Aga Khan is discussed by the journalists. Sunday Times journalist Bryan O'Connor gives details of Shergar's birth in 1978 and the other journalists give descriptions of his appearance and background. He would have stood out as an obvious derby winner. His early racing performances are highlighted, but it was as a three year old that his potential became apparent. D Thompson and J Irwin comment on his victories. Film clip of May 1981 shown, the same year as he won the Derby, ridden by Irish jockey W Swinborne. Journalists comment on his qualities then film clip shown of June 1981 victory with the journalists' recollections, then film of his 27/6/1981 Irish Derby victory. On 25/7/1981 he wins the King George's Race, but he fails to win his next race, the St Ledger. Journalists explain why. The owner Aga Khan then decided to put Shergar out to stud, for financial reasons, beginning in October 1981. He was put in Ballymeny Stud. Journalist Paul Drury comments on why the Aga Khan chose Ireland, then Sean Barry recalls his arrival. His retirement begins. The programme then highlights the absence of security at the Stud. Journalists say that it didn't seem necessary. Shergar was worth £10 million. Crime journalists Ali Bracken and Don McCleen tell of Shergar's groom, Jim Fitzgerald's house being taken over by masked men on 8/2/83. At gunpoint he was forced to get Shergar and put him into a truck. Reconstruction shown. The truck was driven away. Fitzgerald was held for a few hours. He was given the code words 'King Neptune' for ransom communications. Goff's February sales were on so plenty of horse boxes were moving around the area. Jim Fitzgerald was set free in north Kildare. He phoned the Stud Manager first, rather than the police, and a Vet, Stan Cosgrove, then Sean Barry. He recalls the phone call. Barry contacted Minister for Finance Alan Dukes who contacted Minister for Justice Michael Noonan, who contacted the Gardai. It was eight hours after the kidnap before the Gardai were informed. The trail had gone cold. Senior officers were sent from Dublin. Journalist Bryan O'Connor recalls hearing it on the news. He was shocked. The other journalists recall their reaction to the kidnapping, and their worries for the horse. Garda Chief Superintendent Jim Murphy led the investigation. Film clip shown. At first they thought it was ordinary criminals. Derek Thompson was then contacted by the kidnappers. He recalls getting the call in London to fly to Belfast for release talks at the Europa Hotel. He recalls the scene. He was to go to J Maxwell's farm outside Belfast. On the way he was stopped by five armed men. They were the police. He recalls 10 or 12 phone calls to Maxwell's house about Shergar. The last call said that the horse had had an accident and was dead. Film clip of the time shown. In Naas Chief Superintendent Jim Murphy gave daily press conferences. He became a figure of fun as he never had any 'leads'. Film clip shown. He brought in Clairvoyants, Diviners and Psychics but to no avail. Film clip shown of his remarks. Lisa Oliver says that it all became a bit of a joke. Then D Thompson recalls Sean O'Callaghan's (ex-PIRA) book which talks about what he heard during the Shergar kidnapping. Ali Bracken says that the book is probably the accurate account of what happened to Shergar, which was that it was shot. The commentators give a view as to why they didn't just let Shergar go. 30 years later stories still come up about where Shergar is buried. D Thompson calls Shergar 'The People's Horse'.
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
England
Record No.
6599



Date Broadcast:
Mon 17th Feb 2014
Duration:
6 mins 51 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
At a preliminary hearing in the Coroner's Court the sole survivor of the 1976 Kingsmill massacre in south Armagh of ten Protestant workmen the sole survivor Alan Black says that he believes that state agents may have been involved in the killings. Film report with Alan Black's comments, then Karen Armstrong, then FAIR's Willie Frazer and Beatrice Wooton's views, then Jean Lemmon, then the UUP's Danny Kennedy. In courts Jimmy Seales has been sentenced to life for murdering Philip Strickland in north Down in January 2012. Film report on evidence to date. Two of his sons pleaded guilty to murder and one said that his father was there. A Prison Officer admitted to neglect of a prisoner in his care, Colin Bell, who hanged himself in 2008. Film report names the officer as Daniel Barkley. A republican group calling itself the IRA has claimed that it sent letter bombs to England last week. (Mon 6.30)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6600



Date Broadcast:
Mon 17th Feb 2014
Duration:
6 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines then report on the Coroner's Court hearing on the 1976 Kingsmill massacre. Sole survivor Alan Black alleges that state agents may have been involved in the murders. Outside Alan Black comments. Then Karen Armstrong. The Historical Enquiries Team (HET) inquiry concluded that, despite their denials, the PIRA were responsible. John Leckey ordered new forensic tests on the weapons. B Wharton, a relative, comments then Jean Lemmon. The PSNI man driving a jeep that was involved in an incident with Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly has been given an 'informal warning' about his behavior. Film report with Police Federation's Terry Spence's reaction, then a statement from the Public Prosecution Service (PPS). A group calling itself the IRA says that it sent letter bombs to England army offices last week. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6601



Date Broadcast:
Tue 18th Feb 2014
Duration:
17 mins 3 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
PSNI overtime bill hits £72 million in the last year, mainly due to the flag protest disorder. Film report on recent pressures on policing on the streets, with a breakdown of the £72 million figure given, then comments of Assistant Chief Constable Stephen Martin, then a vox pop of the public in Belfast followed by in the studio politicians Paul Givan (DUP) and Dolores Kelly (SDLP) debate the costs issue, recruiting more police officer and dealing with legacy issues like flags and parades, which leads to arguments over the Haas talks. The DUP denies that it is sending out mixed messages on the issue of flags protests. Dolores Kelly says that it is a failure of unionist leadership. In the courts a fourth man, Steven McCaughey (26), was convicted of the January 2012 murder of Philip Strickland in Comber. Film report with CCTV footage of Philip's last movements. Then Andrew Strickland's reaction. Then PSNI Detective Chief Inspector Karen Baxter's comments on the case. Also in the courts Sinn Fein Lord Mayor Mairtin O'Muilleoir gave evidence against two men and a woman accused of assaulting him in Woodvale Park on 6/8/13. Film report names them as Maureen Simpson, Sam Lendrum (52) and Paul Mateer (42). Knowles already pleaded guilty. Alliance MLA Anna Lo gives an interview on racist attacks on her on social media over her comments on flags and murals. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10160
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6602



Date Broadcast:
Thu 20th Feb 2014
Duration:
25 mins 26 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
TG4
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Éagoir (Wronged)
Programme Title:
Gerry Conlon
Description:
In Irish with English subtitles this series presented by Michelle Ni Phaidin examines six cases of injustice by the British or Irish states against individuals who have campaigned to prove their innocence. In this programme she profiles Gerry Conlon of the Guildford Four. The case is now a legend of injustice. She explores the truth and the personal experience behind the myth. 25 years after their release she explores what feelings remain in the victims' hearts, and whether there are long term psychological repercussions. She begins with an old film clip showing violence in Belfast in the 1970s, which was why thousands of young people like Gerry Conlon went to work in London. Gerry Conlon explains that he had fun in London without the tensions of living in Belfast at that time, but then in 1973 the PIRA began bombing Britain, with 36 explosions in London during that year. Film clip shown then Caoilte O'Ciardha PhD, a lecturer in forensic psychology, comments on the PIRA's tactics then Maire Andrews, a local resident, recalls the London bombs. Then SDLP D Bradley comments on how the bombings made life more difficult for the Irish living in London. Then Gerry Conlon's views. On 5/10/1974 in Guildford, 30 miles from London, bombs went off in two pubs where British soldiers socialized. 5 people were killed and 65 injured. There was immense pressure on the police to find out who was responsible. Surrey police began to arrest Irish people. Focus centred on four people, Englishwoman Carole Richardson and three Belfast men, Paul Hill, Paddy Armstrong and Gerry Conlon. The four knew each other socially. Gerry Conlon describes their social and working life. They were known to their community and certainly not behaving like a terror unit. Dominic Bradley supports this view. Ex-PIRA prisoner Seanna Walsh says that Gerry Conlon had never been in the IRA. With no evidence the police pressurized Gerry Conlon into admitting that he was in the PIRA. They stripped and beat him. Gerry Conlon recalls his treatment, with comments from a forensic psychologist. Paul Hill broke and admitted the bombing. Gerry Conlon then describes Paul Hill implicating him. The ill treatment continued but Gerry never gave in. they then threatened to kill his mother. This scared Gerry and he signed a confession. Conlon explains his fears, then Dominic Bradley comments. The four were tried in the old Bailey in 1975. Gerry Conlon recalls the hysteria and the level of interest in the press. Solicitor M Flanagan outlines the prosecution case based on the confessions. Gerry recalls Carole Richardson's belief in English justice. He recalls giving evidence of being tortured but the English jury didn't believe him. They trusted the police and their evidence of voluntary confessions. The importance of the judge summing up is profiled by M Flanigan. Allowing innocent people to go to jail knowingly is evil, says Gerry Conlon. They were found guilty and sentenced to 30 years. The judge said that he regretted that he could not sentence them to death. The forensic psychologist describes how prison would affect an innocent man. Gerry Conlon recalls the verbal abuse he received on his first night. Then Dominic Bradley comments on the hatred aimed at Conlon, who says that he was kept in the dark for the first three months. His father Guiseppe came over from Belfast to clear his son's name. He stayed with relatives called Maguire in London. They were all arrested and charged with running an IRA bomb-making factory. Gerry Conlon recalls the trial. They were all found guilty. Gerry recalls the horror he felt seeing his father in jail with him. In 1975 the Balcombe Street siege with an IRA gang lasted 6 days. The captured IRA men admitted the Guildford pub bombings. Film clip shown. Based on this in 1977 Gerry Conlon launched an appeal. He recalls losing the appeal and being sent back to jail. He recalls the further injustice of that trial. Guiseppe began a letter campaign but died in prison. By 1989 solicitor Gareth Pierce had taken on his case. She proved police discrepancies. Film of Gerry's release shown. M Flanigan comments on the injustice, then Gerry Conlon's closing remarks on British justice.
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6603



Date Broadcast:
Fri 21st Feb 2014
Duration:
2 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines then the judge Weir in the murder trial of loyalists accused of killing Catholic Kevin McDaid in Coleraine in 2009 has criticized the authorities for not giving prosecution evidence material including autopsy reports and CCTV film to defence lawyers. (Fri 6pm)
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6604



Date Broadcast:
Tue 25th Feb 2014
Duration:
17 mins 36 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In England the trial of John Downey, who was charged with the 1982 Hyde Park bombing has collapsed after a secret letter from the Blair government to Sinn Fein appeared to give an amnesty to PIRA 'on the runs' (OTRs). Film report on the judge's decision at the trial from Vincent Kearney. Reporting restrictions have now been lifted. Film clip of the Hyde Park aftermath which killed 4 soldiers and 7 horses in 1982. Then film clip of John Downey arriving for a court hearing. He was arrested last year at Gatwick airport as he travelled to Greece on holiday. At private Old Bailey hearings his lawyers argued that his arrest was a breach of Tony Blair's government promise as part of the peace process dealing with the OTRs. A July 2007 letter revealed in court from the Northern Ireland Office to Sinn Fein said that there were no warrants in existence for the arrest of John Downey. Sinn Fein says that similar letters were sent to over 180 other OTRs. The prosecution says that the letter was sent in error and that John Downey is a wanted man but Justice Sweeney ruled against that on the basis of the letter. Sinn Fein MP Francie Molloy gives his reaction. Then more analysis form Vincent Kearney on the OTRs, including an apology from PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott. Then a further report from Chris Paige on reaction to today's decision. Firstly a statement from the families of the dead soldiers, then Chris Daly, a brother of one of the soldiers, comments on the PSNI error. Then UUP MLA Danny Kinahan, who was best man to Chris Daly's brother, comments on his sadness at the lack of justice. Then former Northern Ireland secretary of State Peter Hain says that dealing with the OTRs was part of the peace process and cannot be unravelled. The current Secretary of State Theresa Villiers says that her officials are investigating the scheme started by the previous government. Then Peter Robinson's statement that Tony Blair couldn't be trusted. Then in a further interview Peter Hain denies Peter Robinson's claim that John Downey was handed a get out of jail free card. He says that to escape Northern Ireland's violence this was a small but important part of the process. He says that OTRs were guaranteed that their cases would be looked into to see if they were wanted or not. He can't say if unionists were away of the deal or not. Then Political Editor Mark Devenport gives analysis from Stormont on the impact of the scheme there. A former PIRA hunger striker, Tom McFeeley, a property developer, has been declared bankrupt. A large amount of cash was found in his house. A clip from tonight's Spotlight programme is played about the millionaire's past and his fall from wealth. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6605



Date Broadcast:
Tue 25th Feb 2014
Duration:
12 mins
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Report on the collapse of the john Downey trial in London, and the revelation that 187 on the run republicans got letters stating that they were not wanted as part of the peace process talks. Programme begins with today's developments at the Old Bailey from Sharon O'Neill, and review of the Hyde Park bombing in 1982. John Downey (62) was charged with killing four soldiers. The PSNI were blamed for the collapse of the trial. Downey got an OTR letter, making him immune from any prosecutions. That was part of the deal to secure PIRA decommissioning in the peace process, but the PSNI failed to tell Downey that he was wanted for the Hyde Park bombing. Former Secretary of State Peter Hain, who was part of the talks with Sinn Fein and the PIRA says that he is stunned that the case got this far. Then Chris Daly, whose brother Anthony was killed in the bomb, gives his reaction to the judge's decision. The UUP MLA Danny Kinahan, who was Anthony Daly's best man gives his reaction to talk of amnesties. Then Sinn Fein's Francie Molloy says that John Downey should never have been arrested. Tonight PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott apologized to the families. Next Paul Clark interviews the current Secretary of State Theresa Villiers. She points out that a grave mistake was made in this case but doesn't think that it was a mistake for the court to consider the case. She highlights the PSNI mistake and explains what the mistake actually was. The Belfast Agreement didn't deal with OTRs and a Labour proposal on dealing with the OTRs was voted down in Parliament. The Labour Government then used this administrative scheme. She says that it is not an amnesty. Downey was told that he wasn't wanted when in fact he was. Her sympathies are with the soldiers' families, not Downey but the judgement won't be appealed. Next the DUP's Nigel Dodds gives his reaction. He says that the letters are effectively as amnesty, and he is angered and outraged. He says that he was opposed to Sinn Fein helping the OTRs but that this deal was typical of Tony Blair and his acolytes. He acknowledges the PSNI mistake but says that Tony Blair placated Sinn Fein and the PIRA and wants the ruling reviewed. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6606



Date Broadcast:
Tue 25th Feb 2014
Duration:
30 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
The Provo and his Property
Description:
Reporter Ciaran Tracy investigates ex-IRA hunger striker Tom McFeeley from Dungiven, who made millions in the property boom then went bankrupt. The banks allege that he has hidden assets, which he denies, but £200, 000 was found hidden in his old home's bathroom. The programme begins with the £200,000 find and Tom McFeeley denying that it was his money and that he has any money hidden. He claims that he is being hounded by the Dublin elite because he is from the north and was in the PIRA. Ciaran Tracy says that McFeeley was paid millions in London and that the money has disappeared offshore. Ciaran Tracy then introduces a biography of McFeeley, born in Foreglen in troubles times, he returned from London and joined the PIRA. In his interview he says he done his best for the IRA but could have done better, been more efficient. He was caught with a bomb, escaped and was caught with guns in 1974. He blasted his way out of Portlaoise prison and was caught two years later after a siege in Greysteel. He got 26 years. Newspaper coverage shown. Tom McFeeley says that he doesn't regret his actions. He spent 12 years in the Maze prison. Anthony McIntyre, who spent time in prison with him in 1980 remembers him as fearless. He spent four years 'on the blanket' and then joined the PIRA's first hunger strike in 1980. He went 56 days without food, the republican leaders called off the hunger strike. Tom McFeeley comments on those events. On his release in 1989 McFeeley returned to the building trade in Dublin during the Celtic Tiger years. Everything he touched turned to gold. He formed a partnership with Larry O'Mahoney. At one point McFeeley was worth 320 million euros. Anthony McIntyre comments on McFeeley giving him a Job. McFeeley bought a 3 million euro home, but says he was still a socialist. Then Ciaran Tracy asks him why the taxman had to chase him for 7 million euros. He says that he had paid 67 million in taxes and that everyone tries to avoid tax. Then Ireland's boom goes bust. Film clip of derelict apartments built by McFeeley in Dundalk. Dublin fire chief Eamon Wolfe explains that they failed fire hazard tests. Tom McFeeley gives his views on that. Then in north Dublin's Priory Hall in October 2011 a judge ordered it to be evacuated due to fire hazard. 200 people were made homeless. Residents explain the hardships they faced over mortgages etc. Then Tom McFeeley says that Priory Hall was not a fire hazard. It could have been fixed. Then he produces documents stating that Priory Hall was certified by his agents. The residents reject that. Tom McFeeley won't apologise. Anthony McIntyre worked on Priory Hall. He says that he feels that he let the residents down. Then Tom McFeeley denies any blame for F Daly's death. Anthony McIntyre comments. Then on 13/1/12 Tom McFeeley declares himself bankrupt in England. He owed £300 million. He explains why he took this action, despite being a republican. However Theresa McGuinness was owed £100,000 by McFeeley. She investigated McFeeley's finances and represented herself in court challenging McFeeley's UK bankruptcy. She won and McFeeley's UK bankruptcy was thrown out, and he was declared bankrupt under much tougher Irish laws. Tom McFeeley gives his views, then Theresa McGuinness rejects his views. In London Ciaran Tracy traces land owned by Tom McFeeley, on which Athena Court is built. Letting agents paid McFeeley £32,000 a week. Tom McFeeley denies this but the court rejects this. In Campsie, Northern Ireland, another Tom McFeeley company shows that London rentals raised £2.9 million. McFeeley says that it went to Ashwood Enterprises on the Isle of Man, but that the owner's identity is secret. (MISSING) brother Derek was a director. Bank of Ireland says that McFeeley was behind Ashwood. McFeeley rejects that, and accuses the NAMA investigators. McFeeley denies that he has any hidden money. Legal action will continue in England over Athena Court. Theresa McGuinness never got her money. Tom McFeeley says that he isn't going away. No end titles.
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6607



Date Broadcast:
Wed 26th Feb 2014
Duration:
21 mins 26 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Peter Robinson has threatened to resign over the secret OTR letters. He wants a judicial inquiry. Film report with Political Editor Mark Devenport's analysis and film clip of Robinson's reaction. He wants to know who the 187 OTRs are and he wants their letters recalled. Alex Maskey says that the Haas proposals need to be implemented, the more of Mark Devenport's analysis followed by Denis Bradley who says that the public knew about all of this. Then the TUV's Jim Allister says that the DUP failed to interrogate the issues during the peace process talks, and says that maybe they didn't want to know. Mark Durkan (SDLP) then Prime Minister David Cameron's views. Then the Attorney General Admits that this Tory government has issued 38 such letters. Naomi Long (Alliance) comments, the Tory MP J Lopresti raises the case of Bloody Sunday soldiers. Next report from Mark Simpson looks at what went on in public and private between 2001-2005 in relation to the OTR issue, at both Hillsborough Castle and Weston Park, including Tony Blair's letter to Gerry Adams. Today in the House of Commons Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers gave an update. Next report from Mervyn Jess looks at the reaction form Victims Commissioner Kathryn Stone, then Police Federation's Terry Spence, then Sinn Fein's Seanna Walsh's views on OTRs. It wasn't secret he says. PUP's Billy Hutchinson calls it unjust, then WAVE's Alan McBride comments. Then in the studio Justice Minister David Ford (Alliance) comments on what he knew. He says that he never saw one of the letters, or received an OTR request. He is going to meet Theresa Villiers tonight on the matter. He disagrees with the scheme. Then more analysis from Vincent Kearney on the PSNI mistakes, followed by Mark Devenport's analysis of Peter Robinson's demands. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10170
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6608



Date Broadcast:
Wed 26th Feb 2014
Duration:
24 mins 33 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Peter Robinson has threatened to resign over the On The Run (OTR) letters revelations. Tonight he met the Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers. Afterwards he said that the crisis had escalated and that he had been told that some terrorists had been granted royal pardons. Film report of Theresa Villiers meeting separately first with Peter Robinson and then with Justice Minister David Ford of the Alliance. Firstly Peter Robinson comments on royal pardons for those who committed offences. He wants a full inquiry and Stormont recalled. Then a review of today's Commons exchanges between Prime Minister David Cameron, the DUP's Nigel Dodds and the SDLP's Mark Durkan. Then former Northern Ireland Secretary Peter Hain (Labour) defends his government decision. Then in the studio Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey and the Alliance Justice Minister give their views on the OTR issue. David Ford says that the royal pardons were news to him, but that the Northern Ireland Secretary didn't inform him, he heard it from Peter Robinson, and he only heard about the OTR letters after the Downey case collapsed on Friday. He told Theresa Villiers that this was an NIO scheme and not a devolved matter as she had indicated. She also said that the scheme is now ended. As a devolved Justice Minister he says he had no knowledge of the scheme. She apologised to him for her misrepresentation. David Ford wants honest answers but says that for him it is not a resignation issue. Then Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey says that these difficulties can be resolved. He says that this issue has been flagged up publically before at the Weston Park talks and in the 2009 Eames/Bradley report (page 121). He says that the scheme allowed people to check out their status and they only got letters if there was nothing against them. He feels that unionists are talking themselves into a crisis at Stormont. He says that the past must be dealt with and that the Haas proposals offered a way to do that. Then David Ford says that we need an inquiry for questions to be answered independently. Tomorrow the relatives of the PIRA Kingsmills massacre are meeting Theresa Villiers but Alan Black, the sole survivor, says that he is so angry that he will not be meeting any politicians. Film report with relatives Ethel Grant and Ozzie Bradley, with Alan Black's reaction. Then Stephen Gault, whose father was killed in the 1987 Enniskillen bombing, gives his reaction. Then victims' campaigner Kenny Donaldson gives his views, then former chief Constable Sir Hugh Order also offers an apology for police mistakes over the Downey case. Then the Police Federation's Terry Spence calls it a 'grubby deal with terrorists'. Stephen Gault says he cannot trust the British government. Alan Black says that truth and justice seems to be a one-way street. Then back in the studio commentators Alex Kane and Brian Rowan and Glen Bradley from Interaction Belfast and a former soldier give their views on the OTR letters revelations. Alex Kane says that he believes that Peter Robinson is serious about resigning and that he did not know about the letters. Brian Rowan says that the scale of the issue is news to him but that, going back to March 2001, he knew that the issue was being dealt with, including prisoner Liam Averill who escaped in December 1997. Also at that time, 5 of the 1983 Maze escapees, in June 2002 Evelyn Glenholmes' case was settled. She was on the run for years. In a news report that he did on Evelyn Glenholmes in 2002 he says that dozens of these cases were dealt with, He says he doesn't know how unionist politicians missed the situation back then. In Eames/Bradley in 2001, page 121, the OTRs are mentioned. Then Glen Bradley, whose RUC uncle was killed by the PIRA, says that he was shocked by the letters but he knew as far back as 1997 that the OTR issue was on the agenda, but that it was a closet Sinn Fein/British government deal. On the royal pardons Brian Rowan quotes the Belfast Telegraph from 4 years ago about a Crumlin Road escapee, but doesn't name him. Alex Kane says that unionists were aware of individual cases over the years but not of such a detailed procedure for so doing. That was a shock. Glen Bradley says that victims should have been considered. In west Belfast a man has been shot in the legs. (Wed 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10180
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6609



Date Broadcast:
Wed 26th Feb 2014
Duration:
45 mins 3 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The Nolan Show
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Presented by Stephen Nolan, the show begins with him asking if Stormont will collapse over the On The Run letters scandal. He shows a film clip of Peter Robinson's angry reaction and demands for an inquiry and that the letters should be recalled. Stephen Nolan asks his panel if power-sharing is really in trouble. They are the DUP's Arlene Foster and Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly. Arlene Foster begins by expressing this as an affront to justice, now magnified by the news that the Royal Prerogative of Mercy was used. She outlines what the DUP wants to know about the letters, and says that Peter Robinson will resign if the letters are not withdrawn and an inquiry called. Gerry Kelly says that Peter Robinson has painted himself into a corner. He gives the Sinn Fein view of the letters. He says that people wanted to know whether they were wanted or not, and that in 187 cases the British government sent out letters confirming that they were not looking for those people. Nolan and Kelly argue over whether these were just letters or fact, done to achieve a conflict resolution. The Bloody Sunday soldiers are mentioned, then he and Arlene Foster argue over the internment issue, and the difference between state forces and republicans. Arlene Foster raises the Haas talks and whether unionists knew about what was being done over the OTRs issue. Gerry Kelly reads what was said is the Eames/Bradley report about OTRs and they argue over this point. Then a Denis Bradley film clip. As Vice Chair of the Policing Board he says that the board were kept well-informed about the OTRs, including a PSNI briefing on this scheme, and all of the political parties would have been well aware of the scheme. Arlene Foster denies that they got any briefing and wants to see the proof in the minutes. Then people in the audience give their views on the OTRs. Gerry Kelly comments on the Haas talks dealing with the past. He mentions the Historical Investigations Unit for people to achieve justice. From London a Tory MP and former soldier says that he is shocked and that he had no knowledge of the letters, but he won't go as far as criticising Theresa Villiers and that he supports Peter Robinson's demands. Then Gerry Kelly points out that these 187 people have not been accused of any crimes. Then Stephen Nolan goes into the audience to get their views on the OTR situation. The panel is then joined by the UUP's Mike Nesbitt, Alex Attwood (SDLP), Jim Allister (TUV) and David Ford of the Alliance. Mike Nesbitt says that people want to move on and achieve a 'just' peace, and wants to know if Richard Haas knew about the letters. Gerry Kelly says that Nesbitt is getting on his high horse, then David Ford reports on tonight's heated discussion with Theresa Villiers. He says she apologised for her misleading statement that the OTR issue has something to do with devolution. Then Alex Attwood comments that he didn't know about the OTR letters when he was on the Policing Board. Then Jim Allister criticises Peter Robinson for keeping Sinn Fein in government. He doubts if Peter Robinson will resign. Arlene Foster points out that Jim Allister was part of the DUP team in 2006-7 for talks. Jim Allister gives his alternative for government here. Then Stephen Nolan interviews Chris Daly, whose brother Anthony was killed in the Hyde Park bombing. He gives his reaction to the collapse of the John Downey trial and the OTR letters issue. He is asked what his brother would think of the OTR scheme. He highlights failure in the police checking system. Then in the audience Florence Graham, whose UDR brother was killed by the PIRA, says she feels let down by the government. She asks Gerry Kelly if he ever thinks about the innocent victims of the troubles. She mentions the victims' conference yesterday which she left because she says that most of those attending were republicans and perpetrators. Gerry Kelly begins to talk about losing friends in the conflict. She tells him that it was a terrorist campaign. Gerry Kelly says that there are victims across the board in Northern Ireland. He tells her that he does not know all of the OTRs nor what they might have been accused of. Then he and Mike Nesbitt debate OTRs as part of the political process, saying that unionists never wanted to deal with the issues of prisoners or the OTRS. Then on the phone Jude Whyte, whose mother was killed by loyalists in 1984, says that listening to the arguments he would advise anyone who is under 30 to get educated and get out of here as this society is fractured and finished. We will have to leave our problems to another generation to solve. Then Arlene Foster calls for a public inquiry and all of the panel discuss whether they will support this or not.
DVD No.
D10180
Tape No.
534
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6610



Date Broadcast:
Thu 27th Feb 2014
Duration:
13 mins 10 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
DUP's Peter Robinson lifts his threat to resign after British Prime Minister David Cameron promised an OTR inquiry. Film report from Martina Purdy covers David Cameron's comments at a European press conference on an independent judge inquiry. He says that he wants to continue to deliver peace and progress for Northern Ireland, but that these letters were not an amnesty. Then film clip of Peter Robinson's response. He says that he is satisfied. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly says that it is a manufactured crisis, which Peter Robinson rejects in his continued comments. Then the TUV's Jim Allister says that Peter Robinson has buckled, that he didn't get the independent inquiry that he wanted and that he has only gotten an administrative review. Then Mark Devenport interviews Secretary of State Theresa Villiers. She comments further on David Cameron's decision and why he took it. The judge will have access to all government papers but that she didn't envisage a lengthy public-inquiry type process lasting many years. It will be time-limited. She says that anyone who received a letter should be aware that if new evidence emerges then the can be arrested. Next report from Mark Simpson engages reaction to the OTR scheme in Co Donegal, where John Downey is having a welcome home party in a local bar this weekend. Then in Fermanagh Enniskillen bomb (1987) victim Stephen Gault says that he is shocked by the number of OTR letters. Then Mark Simpson asks local people if the Assembly collapsed would it be missed? Meanwhile a group of Irish-American business leaders have arrived in Belfast today. They have been briefed on the OTR situation but weren't concerned. Karl May of Vello systems comments. Then in the studio Mark Devenport gives his analysis of the day's events, and what happens tomorrow in Stormont. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10180
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6611



Date Broadcast:
Thu 27th Feb 2014
Duration:
22 mins 56 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The OTR crisis at Stormont appears to be over as British Prime Minister David Cameron announces a judge-led inquiry, but not a public inquiry, into the scheme. DUP's Peter Robinson has withdrawn his threat to resign. Film report covers Cameron's announcement and Peter Robinson's reaction. Sharon O'Neill looks back on today's events with Cameron's comments at a European conference meeting, then a review of John Downey's case. Then Secretary of State Theresa Villiers admits that the British government didn't tell Northern Ireland's First Minister or Justice Minister about the scheme. She also says that OTRs can still be prosecuted if new evidence comes to light. She explains David Cameron's decision, the Peter Robinson says that OTRs will be sleeping less easy in their beds tonight. Martin McGuinness tweets that nothing that has happened has undermined the status of the OTR letters. Gerry Kelly calls the crisis a manufactured one and says that the inquiry is a fig-leaf. Jim Allister accuses Peter Robinson of a cave in as it is not a public inquiry that has been granted. Then UUP's Mike Nesbitt says they are withdrawing from the party leaders talks about the Haas proposals until the inquiry reports back. Then the SDLP's Alex Attwood criticises that decision. Next report has analysis of ITN's Political Editor in London Tom Bradby on the quick reaction of David Cameron to the crisis and what that means in terms of London's attitude to Northern Ireland. He feels that British government minister were surprised when Peter Robinson said that he didn't know about the OTR letters, and that they don't want to change the substance of the scheme as it was part of the peace process. Then back in Belfast UTV's Ken Reid gives his analysis of David Cameron's announcement and Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers' comments, plus the Sinn Fein reaction and the general DUP/Sinn Fein relationship. Next report covers today's meeting between Theresa Villiers and relatives of the 1976 Kingsmills massacre of 10 Protestant workmen in south Armagh. The sole survivor, Alan Black, was so outraged by the OTR letters that he refused to attend the meeting. May Quinn says that nobody but the IRA seems to have any sway with the government. Jean Lemmon was emotional. UUP's Danny Kennedy says that it was a shabby, rotten deal. In Castlederg Shelley Gilfinnan, whose UDR brother and uncle were killed by the PIRA, gives her reaction to the OTR scheme. Then Margo Hetherington, whose father was an RUC Reservist and was killed by the PIRA, givers her reaction. Both women called it a dirty deal, and they talk about the suspects in the killings who are on the run, some in Donegal and some in Northern Ireland. The say that the Historical Enquiry Team' (HET) reports into the killings are now worthless. Next report is a vox pop of opinions of people in west and east Belfast on the OTRs, where it appears opinion is broken down along orange and green lines. Then some of the comments on Twitter are read out by Paul Clark. In the studio Law Lecturer Rosemary Craig gives her views on what powers the judge in the OTR inquiry will have, which are limited. Then journalist Eamon Maillie criticises Peter Robinson for accepting the 'weak' inquiry. Then they discuss the legal status of the OTR letters. Are they legally part of the peace process or are they not? In Ballykelly a security alert after the finding of two suspicious objects. Film report. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly has withdrawn his civil writ against the PSNI Chief Constable after the incident in which he was carried along on the bonnet of a PSNI jeep. Steve Hobbs (62), a former officer in the HET has been arrested after the theft of police documents. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10180
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6612



Date Broadcast:
Thu 27th Feb 2014
Duration:
35 mins 4 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers discusses the On The Runs (OTRs) letters scheme and today's announcement by the British Prime Minister David Cameron of a judge-led inquiry into the legality of the scheme. He asks whether Cameron's announcement the full public inquiry that Peter Robinson demanded. The politicians in the studio are Jeffrey Donaldson (DUP), Jim Allister (TUV), Mark Durkan (SDLP) and Alex Maskey (Sinn Fein). Programme begins with film report of the week's events including Peter Robinson's threat to resign over the OTR scheme. Comments on who knew what and when from Denis Bradley, Gerry Kelly, Martin McGuinness and David Ford, then David Cameron's statement. Next Jeffrey Donaldson denies that Cameron's statement is a far cry from what Peter Robinson demanded. He accuses Mark Carruthers of twisting words and gets annoyed at the suggestion that Robinson didn't get what he wanted. He says that Robinson didn't ask for a judicial inquiry, but a judge-led inquiry, they debate the powers that this judge will have to call witnesses. Donaldson also highlights that there will also be a Parliamentary inquiry. Then Jim Allister calls Jeffrey Donaldson 'the man sent to spin'. He says that this inquiry is nothing like what Robinson wanted. He says that Robinson has done a U-turn, and explains his views in detail, calling it a paper exercise by a judge, and says that Robinson has betrayed troubles victims. Then Alex Maskey says that this issue highlights the bigger problem of dealing with the past. He says that no one party represents the victims. He says that the Haas proposals give the majority of victims options. He claims that this issue is being used as a 'get out of Haas card' by the two unionist parties. He says that all parties were aware that the OTR issue was being addressed right back to the Weston Park talks in 2001, up to the 2209 Eames/Bradley report and the current Gerry McGeough case, but the SDLP's Mark Durkan says that he didn't know that it was going on in these terms. He says that there were things that the parties decided they didn't need to know. He recalls 2005 NI Offences Bill and the thrust then by the DUP to blame the UUP and David Trimble for it. Jeffrey Donaldson denies this. Mark Durkan also says that Jim Allister, who was in the DUP then, knew all about the OTRs. Jim Allister denies this. Mark Durkan says that the issue of amnesty back then wasn't a deal-breaker for the DUP as long as David Trimble got the blame. Jeffrey Donaldson accuses Mark Durkan of re-writing history. The DUP voted against the Offences Bill he says. Mark Carruthers asks the politicians to discuss where we go now on the issue. Jeffrey Donaldson and Jim Allister have a heated exchange, shouting each other down. Alex Maskey repeats a call for dealing with the past. Then Mark Durkan criticises Sinn Fein's position on dealing with the past. It all ends in a shouting match. Mark Carruthers then proceeds to talk to the Director of Public Prosecutions Barra McGrory, appointed in 2011, who before that represented clients who would have been classed as OTRs. He begins by discussing David Cameron's announcement of a judge-led inquiry. He is confident that it will get answers, but refuses to answer whether he knew about the OTR letters until the inquiry meets. He defends the English DPS decision not to appeal against the decision in the Downey case. He confirms that OTR cases were still being heard a few months ago. He then calls the Haas proposals on the past positive and focused. On John Larkin's proposal not to prosecute anyone for offences committed before 1998 he argues that this is wrong, and mentions historical prosecutions that were successful. He then comments on the February 2012 collapse of a UVF 'assisting offenders' case and says that 'supergrass' trials were for the greater good of society and that each case must be taken on its own merit. When asked about the OTR situation he denies that he is compromised because he used to represent OTRs. Then commentators Alex Kane and Paul McFadden give their reaction to Barra McGrory's interview, and the round-table political discussion on the OTRs and the judge inquiry.
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6614



Date Broadcast:
Fri 28th Feb 2014
Duration:
9 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Angry scenes at Stormont as MLAs debate the OTR letters scheme. Outside the chamber Steven Gault and Kenny Donaldson from SEFF unionist victims group shout abuse at Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness. Film report. Clips of speech by DUP's Peter Robinson, then Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness, then UUP's Mike Nesbitt, then TUV's Jim Allister, Alliance's David Ford and the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell. Outside Innocent Victims United's Kenny Donaldson calls the debate 'rubbish'. In the studio David Ford comments on the 5 OTR letters going through the system at the minute, and his inability to stop them being issued. He says that the legal status of the letters is unclear as this is a Northern Ireland Office scheme. Then Political Editor Ken Reid gives his analysis of the day's events and the future, if any, of the Haas talks, and the current tensions between the DUP and Sinn Fein. (Fri 6pm)
DVD No.
D10180
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6613



Date Broadcast:
Fri 28th Feb 2014
Duration:
10 mins 16 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Stormont MLAs today held a debate on the On The Runs (OTR) letter scheme. Film report begins with Martin McGuinness' address to the press in the Great Hall in Stormont. As he walks away Steven Gault of the Enniskillen bomb families shouts abuse, then with Kenny Donaldson beside him he gives his views to the press about innocent victims being trampled on. Then a report on the debate inside the chamber, with the DUP's Peter Robinson's speech. Then Martin McGuinness accuses Peter Robinson of engaging in knee-jerk politics. Then UUP's Mike Nesbitt says that if there were any other dirty deals he wants to know now. Then TUV leader Jim Allister calls the judge inquiry a farce. Then the DUP's Arlene Foster calls for the current 5 OTR applications to be rejected. Next Vincent Kearney reports that although Justice Minister David Ford (Alliance) was angry about being kept in the dark about the OTR scheme. The top civil servant in the Justice department, Nick Perry, did know about the scheme as he used to work in the Northern Ireland Office but that he didn't tell David Ford. Film report shows the letter dated 8-6-2000 from Jonathan Powell (Tony Blair's Chief of Staff) to Nick Perry about the OTR scheme. David Ford says he understands why Nick Perry didn't tell him because of the Civil Service Code of Conduct. A further report then asks Stormont MLAs with a legal background for their views on the legal status of the OTR letters and what they think the role of the Northern Ireland Office is. SDLP's Alex Attwood, DUP's Peter Weir then TUV's Jim Allister on the judge's powers followed by Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers' views. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6615



Date Broadcast:
Fri 28th Feb 2014
Duration:
21 mins 54 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Stormont Today
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers introduces coverage of the heated debate today in the chamber over the On The Runs (OTR) letters issue with film clip of MLAs' comments. It begins with the DUP's Peter Robinson calling the Downey verdict an affront to justice, but that it exposed a Sinn Fein/British Government deal done over ten years ago. He highlights that the outrage caused is not 'manufactured'. He wants to know who knew what and when, and to know that the OTRs cannot rely on these letters to avoid prosecution. He recalls Gerry Adams' call for an 'invisible process' to deal with the OTRs, and Gerry Kelly comments that unionists were kept in the dark to avoid a crisis. He comments on judges' powers then a clip is shown of Martin McGuinness' speech. He says that issues concerning the past are being used to poison the present. He calls for a renewed focus on the Haas proposals. He says that the Stormont institutions are being irresponsibly threatened by events this week. He says that the OTR scheme is not an amnesty. He quotes the British Attorney General's comments that this was a lawful process. He wants to deal with the real issues in our society, not the manufactured ones. Then in the studio commentators Fionnuala O'Connor and Sam McBride give their comments on the current relationship between Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness and whether Peter Robinson got what he wanted in this judge-led inquiry promised by David Cameron. They also discuss his threat to resign. Was it genuine or just electioneering? Then a film clip shown of SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell saying he wants to know if any other deals have been done, and he wants urgent progress on dealing with the past. Then the UUP's Mike Nesbitt talks about the party's opposition to the devolution of policing and justice matters in 2010 saying that the time wasn't right. He says that Sinn Fein knew about the OTR issue then and during the Haas talks but kept silent. He says that UUP involvement in the Hass process is over because of Sinn Fein's bad faith. Then Alliance's David Ford says that the NIO has told him that this is an issue that they are responsible for and that it is not a devolved matter, as had previously been said. There are still five OTR cases, he says, and they are nothing to do with the Department of Justice. Next film clip covers TUV leader Jim Allister's broadside against the DUP. Peter Robinson, he says, didn't get the inquiry that he wanted, where nobody will be compelled to attend and is a whitewash. He also refers to Arlene Foster being 'on the run' herself after yesterday saying that the letters would be rescinded. He is heckled by the DUP throughout his speech and the Speaker has to intervene. Then commentators views on the TUV/DUP clash and Jim Allister's referral to Arlene Foster as being 'on the run', with Fionnuala O'Connor commenting that Jim Allister was in the DUP at the time of the OTR discussions. Next a film clip of Arlene Foster's speech, in which she calls the Sinn Fein/British government deal 'collusion' in this 'dirty deal'. She says it gave a 'get out of jail free' card to cowards. She tells victims of violence that the DUP will get answers. She says that justice and the democratic process in Northern Ireland has been shamed. The DUP motion was carried by 58 votes to 27, with 13 abstentions. Then the commentators' views on what happens next.
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6616



Date Broadcast:
Sun 2nd Mar 2014
Duration:
14 mins 28 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Sunday Politics
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Introduced by Mark Carruthers, he interviews the Alliance's Justice Minister David Ford about the fallout over the OTR letters and where this leaves the peace process. Mark Carruthers asks David Ford to comment on former Northern Ireland secretary of State Peter Hain's call today for soldiers involved in Bloody Sunday not to be prosecuted. David Ford feels that he is trying to appease those that he offended with the PIRA OTR scheme. David Ford says that he feels that if there is evidence then prosecutions in troubles cases should go ahead. He blames the apparent anomaly now in the peace process on British government side deals. David Ford is questioned about the Bloody Sunday case. He says that just because someone was 'on duty' doesn't mean that they couldn't have committed a crime. He rejects amnesties and supports any attempt to get justice wherever possible. Also today Peter Robinson has accused Peter Hain of misleading Parliament in 2006 and 2007 over the OTR situation, which Peter Hain has refuted. David Ford says that he feels that Peter Hain's Hansard remarks are less than the full truth and the inquiry judge will look at that. He then comments on the five live OTR cases, which the DUP want stopped. It is unclear if this can be done, he says, and that he is not dealing with this issue and that he wants no part of Peter Hain's 'shabby' scheme. He then comments on the former NIO Civil Servant Nick Perry knowing about the scheme but when he came to work in the Department of Justice he didn't tell David Ford about it. David Ford accepts that this was as a result of the Civil Service Code of Conduct, explains how it works and defends Nick Perry's behaviour. On the Haas talks he says that Mike Nesbitt was foolish to say that he was withdrawing from the Haas process. The Alliance Party wants to continue with the process and move Northern Ireland forward. Then commentators Newton Emerson and Cathy Gormley-Heenan comment on Peter Hain's remarks on the Bloody Sunday soldiers and if he did mislead Parliament on the OTR issue, and did Peter Robinson get what he wanted from David Cameron? They also ask if the Haas proposals are dead in the water. Finally, the week's news in 60 seconds.
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6617



Date Broadcast:
Mon 3rd Mar 2014
Duration:
17 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The OTR controversy continues today as the relatives of the Birmingham pub bombings on November 1974 have reacted angrily to Paddy Hill's remarks that two of the five bombers got letters of assurance and another two have died. Film report with old news clips of 1974 bombs and comments of Brian Hambleton whose sister Maxine died in the attacks also Today the victims of Bloody Sunday shootings have reacted to former Secretary of State Peter Hain's remarks that the paratroopers involved should not be prosecuted. John Kelly, whose brother was killed, gives his reaction. Then Basil McCrea of NI21 says that a line should be drawn under the past. Also today Independent Unionist Lady Sylvia Hermon says that Peter Hain needs to clarify his remarks to the Commons in 2007 when he said that no arrangements were being put in place to deal with OTRs. In Stormont today, Peter Robinson said that talks about the Haas proposals are effectively parked until the OTR inquiry has reported. Tracy Magee reports then David Ford reveals he is seeking legal advice over the current OTR responsibilities under devolution. Back in the studio politicians Paul Givan (DUP), Gerry Kelly (Sinn Fein), Tom Elliott (UUP), Alban McGuinness (SDLP) and Chris Lyttle (Alliance) discuss the case of the 38 OTR letters issued since devolution of policing and justice and whether or not they are still legal. The same party political positions as in previous debates are maintained. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6618



Date Broadcast:
Tue 4th Mar 2014
Duration:
3 mins 54 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then coverage of row at Belfast City Council debate when DUP councillor Ruth Patterson wore a Linfield scarf to praise the team's manager David Jeffrey. Sinn Fein councillor Jim McVeigh raised an objection to the scarf with the Lord Mayor Christopher Stalford, who over-ruled him. A heated exchange and stand-off followed. Film report. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6619



Date Broadcast:
Tue 4th Mar 2014
Duration:
? mins ? secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
No opening titles. DUP' Peter Robinson says that he believes that the OTR letters issued after the 2010 devolution of policing and justice have no legal value. Film report with Tracy Magee. He says that the Northern Ireland Justice Minister after 2010 should have been told about the OTR scheme. Yesterday Peter Robinson met the Chief Constable Matt Baggott met the Chief Constable to discuss the judge-led inquiry. The PSNI now say that there are 228 OTR cases before them. Robinson is then again questioned about how he didn't know about the OTR scheme. He says that nobody knew about the secret administrative scheme that the Northern Ireland Office were running. He denies that what David Cameron offered him was well short of what he demanded. Then Tracy Magee interviews Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly about the legality of the 38 post devolution letters. He maintains that in the final analysis the legality of the letters have been tested in the courts in the John Downey case. Then Paul Clark discusses the OTR issue with Brian Rowan and Professor Deirdre Heenan, and who knew what and when, and Brian Rowan recalls the Evelyn Glenholmes case.
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6620



Date Broadcast:
Tue 4th Mar 2014
Duration:
58 mins 8 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
Is the OTR controversy a serious political setback?
Description:
Presented by Noel Thompson, in this extended programme he examines the question of whether the On the Run (OTR) letter controversy is a serious political setback or just a storm in a tea-cup. He has a panel of local politicians and uses film reports from victims' relatives and old news reports to examine the issue. After introductory comments he introduces a film report from Declan Lawn titled The Judgement, which examines the detailed judgement of Justice Sweeney in the John Downey case and his remarks on the OTR scheme, which became known as Operation Rapid. It began with a film of the 1981 IRA Hyde Park bombing, of which John Downey was accused. His trial collapsed as he had received a letter saying that he was no longer wanted. The letter was from the PSNI's Operation Rapid team. A re-enactment of the judge's remarks is shown. The Judgement also shows how the OTR scheme worked and how many republicans had their status altered in PSNI files. Declan Lawn uses the information that the PSNI had on John Downey to illustrate this point. He had been wanted for decades for five separate incidents, including the Hyde Park bombing and the killing of two UDR soldiers near Enniskillen in 1972. In March 2006 the Northern Ireland Office told Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly that Downey was still wanted. In February 2007, just before Sinn Fein and the DUP went into government together, Kelly submitted a list of names, including Downey's, to the PSNI Operation Rapid team. In May 2007, two days after the new Stormont Executive was sworn in, the PSNI concluded that Downey was no longer wanted by them. The DUP's Gregory Campbell comments on this change of Downey's stratus in under a year. Then Gerry Kelly comments on the change of status as he sees it. In June 2007 the British Attorney General confirmed that there were 75 individuals wanted but by September 2009 that number had dropped to 16. Solicitor John McBurney comments on the drop in numbers, then Gregory Campbell and then Gerry Kelly on those 'wanted then not wanted' cases. The PSNI would not comment. Then the judge's view on Operation Rapid. In 2008 the Historical Enquiries Team (HET) found evidence linking Downey to the two UDR murders in 1972.The judge says that this made him a murder suspect again. The question is asked as to why has Downey never been arrested for this? Gerry Kelly comments and doubts that the HET's evidence was strong. Declan Lawn then profiles what the next judge's inquiry will have to do. This is the hidden price that we had to pay for peace. Back in the studio Noel Thompson talks to his political panel of Alex Maskey (Sinn Fein), Arlene Foster (DUP), Jim Allister (TUV), Dolores Kelly (SDLP), Mike Nesbitt (UUP) and Stephen Farry (Alliance). He begins with a general question. Will this new inquiry lance the boil that has erupted from the Downey case? Alex Maskey begins by outlining Sinn Fein's position on the release of prisoners and resolving the issue of OTRs, the Dolores Kelly rejects the idea of amnesties and Jim Allister calls it a fix to get Sinn Fein and the DUP into government. Then Mike Nesbitt says that he has a 2002 letter from David Trimble to Tony Blair saying that OTRs should go through the courts. Arlene Foster refers to the HET report on the UDR killings, and March 2007's question from the UUP's Sylvia Hermon in the Commons in relation to the Johnston/Eames families (UDR 1972). Arlene Foster wants this case revisited in relation to John Downey. She clashes with Alex Maskey on the viability of the HET. Stephen Farry says that we need a comprehensive process for dealing with the past. He mentions the Haas process. Jim Allister says that the inquiry is only a paper exercise. Dolores Kelly calls it collusion and an affront to democracy. Then Alex Maskey and Mike Nesbitt clash over the integrity of the law in Northern Ireland in past years. Then Noel Thompson asks the panel for their views on Peter Robinson's claim that the 38 letter issued since the restoration of devolution have no legal standing. The panel all give opinions along party lines, and the discussion develops into a clash between Arlene Foster and Jim Allister as he says that the DUP is clutching at straws as the letters will not be withdrawn. Then Noel Thompson stops them arguing and introduces a report from Jenny O'Leary entitled 'Victims' Views'. She is in an ex-prisoners centre in Letterkenny, Co Donegal called 'Abhaile Aris' used by John Downey and Gerry McMonagle, then over the border Shelly Gilfennan in Castlederg talks about the 1982 killing of her UDR uncle Lexie Cummings by the PIRA. The man that was charged with his murder was Gerry McMonagle but she says that he was released on a technicality. Film clip shown. He became an OTR. Jenny O'Leary says that he re-joined the PIRA and in 2010 a HET report said that he was no longer wanted in connection with Lexie Cummings' murder. Gerry McMonagle is a Sinn Fein councillor in Donegal and has crossed the border to meet the PSNI on other issues. The DUP's Jim Shannon asked a question in the House of Commons about this issue. Then the HET report on Gerry McMonagle is read by Shelley and she gives her reaction to the John Downey situation as 'unbelievable'. A dirty deal. Then Brian McConnell is interviewed. His uncle was killed by the PIRA in 1976 in south Armagh. A man was convicted but the HET discovered that another suspect had been removed from the PSNI database. He gives his reaction and guesses that that suspect got an OTR letter. The Downey judgement also revealed that he was wanted for the 1972 killings of UDR members A Johnstone and J Eames near Enniskillen. Film clip shown, then Mrs Eames statement read by Jenny O'Leary. Then Patricia McBride, whose PIRA brother was killed by the security forces in 1984 says that any attempt at an effective amnesty for all can only be achieved by consensus. Then B McConnell comments on the damage done to the rule of law by the OTR scheme, then the views of Shelley Gilfennan on getting justice, and that if she cannot get that then she would like the truth. Next Noel Thompson introduces another film report from Chris Moore entitled 'the Political View'. In this he asks whether Peter Robinson's threat to resign was an election stunt and did he overplay his hand? He begins with a vox pop of people in east Belfast regarding Peter Robinson's actions, then Alex Kane's comments on the internal criticisms of Peter Robinson within the DUP since the flags protest issue and how this shocked, knee-jerked reaction strengthened his party position. Then the political commentator Suzanne Breen calls it a sham fight, and says that she seriously doubts that the DUP leadership didn't know that the OTR issue was being dealt with. She believes that Northern Ireland's sectarian politics and DUP/Sinn Fein fights is about conning the public. Alex Kane says that all the DUP & Sinn Fein have to do is play to their own sides. Back in the studio the politicians are asked by Noel Thompson whether they think that Peter Robinson over-played his hand. Arlene Foster says that there was nothing manufactured in Robinson's reaction, that he was genuinely really angry. She comments on Jim Shannon's 2012 question in the House of Commons and why the DUP didn't follow up on the OTR issue at the time. Then Jim Allister says that Robinson climbed down and settled for nothing. Then Mike Nesbitt says that there was a general political failure to examine the OTR issue. He feels that these side deals are destroying trust and must be exposed. Alex Maskey says that all of the parties had their own side deals on various issues. Then Dolores Kelly comments on the 2002 Weston Park statement about the OTRs. She says that the SDLP negotiated on behalf of all the people, not just their own party. Stephen Farry says that the OTRs should have been dealt with in an open deal just like the release of prisoners. He says that the Haas talks contained proposals for discussion regarding immunity, which is victims-driven. He explains his opinion on this. Mike Nesbitt then explains the UUP's objections to the Historical Investigations Unit element in the Haas proposals. Then Jim Allister says that the HIU element won't work because the culprits have OTR letters. Dolores Kelly says that victims want a HIU with ethics. Back to the judge inquiry, the panel are asked whether all of those who received OTR letters should be named. Arlene Foster quotes the Gerry McGeough case judge's remarks. Jim Allister says the OTRs won't be named in what is a paper exercise. Stephen Farry mentions human rights law about naming people who have not been convicted of any offence. Alex Maskey agrees with this point, and says that to resolve the issue they should return to the Haas talks. Jim Allister says that the Stormont system is corrupted. Arlene Foster accuses him of playing political games. She says that we were all hoodwinked by the OTR scheme, but that she doesn't want to return to direct rule. Dolores Kelly attacks the Social Investment Fund, which Alex Maskey calls a disgraceful comment. Mike Nesbitt says that he would like to see an official opposition. They end the programme arguing about whether Stormont can survive.
DVD No.
D10200
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6622



Date Broadcast:
Wed 5th Mar 2014
Duration:
14 mins 18 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
USA Ex-President Bill Clinton visits Derry and tells local politicians to finish the job of the peace process. He also honours John Hume. Film report. Tonight he gives inaugural lecture at Queens University, Belfast. Vice Chancellor Patrick Johnston explains why they have named the new Leadership institute after him. The Northern Ireland Affairs Committee in Westminster has decided to launch an OTR letter investigation they feel that the judges terms of reference are too narrow. Also at today's Policing Board meeting Chief Constable Matt Baggott denies that OTR letters are an amnesty. Film report covers a PUP protest at the meeting, with Matt Baggott's comments. Then DUP MLA Jonathan Craig accuses the Northern Ireland Office of a cover-up. Final report looks at Vietnamese refugees who came to Northern Ireland in 1979 to make Northern Ireland their home. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10190
Tape No.
535
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6621



Date Broadcast:
Wed 5th Mar 2014
Duration:
14 mins 18 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Former US President Bill Clinton visits Derry and Belfast today. Film report begins with his Belfast visit where he visits Martin McGuinness and Peter Robinson at Stormont Castle for private talks on a wide range of matters, then Martin McGuinness' views on the talks which include the Haas proposals and Clinton's call on the Northern Ireland politicians to 'finish the job' on the peace process. Then Bill Clinton went to the Riddell Hall at Queens University to open a new Leadership Institute, where he reflected on the day and his hopes for the future in his speech. Queens University Vice-Chancellor Patrick Johnston comments. Then film report on his visit to Derry this morning where he met John Hume and addressed a meeting at the Guildhall where he honoured John Hume, then Pat Hume's reaction, and John Hume and Martin McGuinness. Then Tracy Magee's analysis of Clinton's message in his speech to 'get the job done' in respect of the peace process. In other news the Chief Constable held an emergency meeting of the Policing Board to state that the OTR letters were not a 'get out of jail free card'. The DUP accused Matt Baggott of being evasive. Film report shown of the PUP protest at the Policing Board meeting. Then Matt Baggott comments on the OTR letters, then the DUP's Jonathan Craig, then Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly's views on the letters. In the House of Commons the DUP's Nigel Dodds asks the House to examine whether MPs were misled by ministerial statements over the OTR issue. In courts Fionna McFadden (29) has been charged with providing a false alibi for a suspect in the murder of Prison Officer David Black in November 2012. Film report. (Wed 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10200
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6623



Date Broadcast:
Wed 5th Mar 2014
Duration:
39 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
Discrimination ... They think it's all over
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Comedian and former lawyer for the Northern Ireland Fair Employment Agency Tim McGarry charts the story of fair employment laws in Northern Ireland. The programme begins with black and white film clips of people talking about job discrimination in Northern Ireland in the 1960s. Tim McGarry then links job discrimination to the outbreak of the troubles in 1969, then a film clip is shown of an interview with Martin McGuinness recalling that he was turned down for a job when he was 15 because he was a Catholic. Then UUP MP Ken Magennis says that the IRA killed 2200 people because Martin McGuinness couldn't get a job. After opening titles Historian Eamon Phoenix talks about job discrimination in the shipyard in the 1900s when Catholics were expelled in the 1920s. Then the PUP's David Ervine recalls Edward Carson telling the Stormont government to look after the minority. David Ervine then says that unionists did not. Then Tim McGarry asks a range of opinions about how much discrimination existed in Northern Ireland. Brian Feeney says that it was planned and systematic, Dermot Nesbitt (UUP) says that it existed on both sides. The TUV's Jim Allister then says that Civil rights grievances were grossly over-egged. Then the PUP's Dawn Purvis recalls Protestants being told 'you think you are doing badly but look at them across the way'. Eamon Phoenix recalls Craigavon's words 'all I boast is that we are a Protestant Parliament for a Protestant people' and in 1933 Basil Brooke encouraging Protestant employers to 'only employ Protestant lads and lassies, and not Catholics who were 99% disloyal and out to cut our throats', and also Jim Andrews in 1933 saying 'we have 31 Porters in Stormont. 30 are Protestant and 1 is Catholic, but he is only temporary'. Then Dawson Bates, the Home Affairs Minister at Stormont, who refused to use the phones at Stormont after he heard that there was a Catholic telephonist at work. Eamon Phoenix says that there was a political culture embedded in the unionist system. Then Martin McGuinness comments on the hierarchy in Northern Ireland. Dawn Purvis agrees. Then a film clip of the UUP's Roy Bradford in the early 1970s is shown. He says that Catholic unemployment is not because of religion, but because of where they live. Then an un-named unionist accuses Catholics of discrimination against Protestants. A black & white film clip in Derry hears of people being asked what school they went to. Then Brian Feeney recalls the Civil Service discrimination that he is aware of. Then Eamon Phoenix profiles Northern Ireland Prime Minister Terence O'Neill, a man who knew change was need and who engaged in gesture politics. Cardinal Conway accused him of raising Catholic hopes and then dashing them. The movement for change then took to the streets with the Civil Rights Association marches. Film clip shown, then a film clip of Lord Brookeborough blaming the IRA and Communists. He says that it would have been difficult to ease discrimination as Catholics were still backing the IRA. Then Eamon Phoenix's analysis of Terence O'Neill's resignation speech, which he calls racist and condescending. Then Sinn Fein's Danny Morrison cites discrimination and the un-reformable state as a reason for the troubles. He recalls his own experience of discrimination in 1971 when he went for a librarian's job. Film of 1972 abolition of Stormont shown and a film of Northern Ireland Secretary of State William Whitelaw talking about getting a balanced workforce in the shipyard. In 1976 the British Government passed the Fair Employment Act and established the Fair Employment Agency. Tim McGarry then explains the weakness of this agency. Brian Feeney calls the 1976 act rubbish. Then a TV advertisement is shown. Then Denis Godfrey CBE on his role at the time. Then Robert Cooper, the FEA chief, on his role at the time. Then Denis Godfrey's views on him, followed by Eileen Lavery's views on him and the founding of the Alliance Party. He was a minister in the power-sharing Executive in 1973. Unionists called the FEA the 'Fenian Employment Agency'. Then the case of Shorts employment record with Bob Cooper's remarks. DUP's D Calvert wants the FEA disbanded. Then D Godfrey recalls the hatred of Bob Cooper in unionist areas. Bob Cooper comments on his investigation of the Northern Ireland Civil Service's employment practices, which was against the Northern Ireland Office's wishes. Then a BBC news report from 1976 shows that Catholics were still twice as likely to be unemployed as Protestants, due to recruitment practices by employers. Dawn Purvis comments, then Danny McAllister, a Catholic, recalls a visit with his son to a factory covered in Union Jacks. Inez McCormick recalls factories not cooperating with the FEA. It took Shorts four years to bring in the FEA programme. In the USA the McBride Principles were being accepted for fair employment. John Henning comments. US firms in Northern Ireland can't join in discrimination. Profile of 1984 Sean McBride principles. Father Sean McManus comments, then Brian Feeney. Northern Ireland Secretary Tom King, speaking in the USA, rejects the McBride principles, as does B Cooper, but in the end Tom King introduces a new FEA in 1989. TV clip is shown of his remarks. This was a strong anti-discrimination act introduced by Margaret Thatcher. Tim McGarry details the new F.E Commission's powers. Employers now had to know the breakdown of Catholic/Protestant workers in their workplace. Denis Godfrey and Gregory Campbell (DUP) comment. Film clip of Tim McGarry working in the FEC office shown. Billy McDowell from the Hole in the Wall Gang was also employed there. He explains what his job was. Then Rosemary Connolly on legal cases. Then B McDowell comments on one case that he worked on where what was happening on the streets crept into the workplace. Film clip shown with comments. Companies were realising that the FEC could cost them a lot of money as cases of discrimination made the news. B McDowell recalls another case, and Tim McGarry recalls cases against Catholic firms. Eventually firms got the message. Gone were the mini-Twelfths on the shop floors. The 1989 Act worked. And changed Northern Irish society but Jim Allister and Gregory Campbell say that things have gone too far. Then final contributors comment on discrimination.
DVD No.
D10200
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6624



Date Broadcast:
Thu 6th Mar 2014
Duration:
53 mins 29 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then at the Policing Board meeting today there were angry exchanges between the Chief Constable Matt Baggott and the DUP on the issue of On the Runs (OTRS). Film report as the DUP claim that they weren't briefed on Operation Rapid. Matt Baggott says that the board was briefed in 2010 about the process, and this was followed up in a letter. Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly comments. Vincent Kearney says that the PSNI were asked to clarify the status of 228 OTRs in total. Of those 192 were not wanted, 15 were actively wanted and 8 would be returned to jail then released. Other figures given. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10200
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6625



Date Broadcast:
Thu 6th Mar 2014
Duration:
21 mins 11 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers examines the On The Runs issue, this time profiling the views of victims and survivors of the troubles. Firstly he looks at the allegation today by UUP MLA Danny Kinahan that an OTR in Northern Ireland is, like John Downey, using a letter that was issued by mistake. A film report by Stephen Walker looks at all of the inquiries that have been announced in the last weeks relating to the OTR letters and Danny Kinahan's allegations. Alliance Justice Minister David Ford says that he knew nothing about this scheme as it was a Northern Ireland Office (NIO) scheme, but the NIO or the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) won't comment as the scheme is the subject of an inquiry. Next Stephen Walker films a Victims & Survivors Forum meeting and profiles ex-RUC member Errol McDowell's resignation over the issue. Then former member Geoff Hamilton's views on the OTR issue, then the opinion of Jude Whyte, whose mother was killed by the UVF in 1984. He says that getting justice is unlikely due to practical reasons. Then Alice Harper, whose father Daniel Teggart was killed by British paratroopers in the Ballymurphy massacre of August 1971, says that she wants her day in court, even though she knows that the soldiers involved won't go to jail. Then Queens University Professor Kieran McEvoy comments on the media's shock headlines around this issue as the letters are not amnesties. Then in the studio Mark Carruthers talks to Victims' Commissioner Kathryn Stone, the UUP's Tom Elliott and the DUP's Ian Paisley's Jr. He begins by asking Tom Elliott about Danny Kinahan's claim today about a wrongly issued letter. He cites all of the government departments that he wants to talk to about the issue. He wants the entire process stopped and Secretary of State Theresa Villiers to apologise to victims. As a member of the Stormont Justice Committee he is asked to outline what kind of inquiry he wants to see, and why he doesn't just leave it to the judge's inquiry. Then Ian Paisley Jr is asked why he wants a Westminster Northern Ireland committee inquiry and not just the judge's inquiry. He says that it is not a case of either/or. He says that he welcomes the spotlight being shone into every corner to get truth and transparency. Paisley then denies the fact that the judge-led inquiry isn't what Peter Robinson had asked for, and that it's not enough on its own, and he quotes the government taking 18 years to set up the Stephen Lawrence inquiry and the DUP getting an OTR inquiry within 48 hours. It is pointed out to Paisley that the Lawrence inquiry is a public one and the OTR one isn't. Paisley replies that what the OTRs have in their pocket is a 'beaten docket' and 'we are coming after them'. Then Tom Elliott says that he believes that Peter Robinson was outmanoeuvred on this issue and he welcomes the Commons Select Committee inquiry. Then Mark Carruthers asks the Victims Commissioner, Kathryn Stone, how victims are being affected by the OTR issue. She replies that those that she has spoken to expressed feelings of anger, revulsion and betrayal. She goes on to comment on victims being denied access to justice over many years. Victims want truth, justice and acknowledgement. Then Mark Carruthers questions Paisley over his comments that the OTR scheme is over. He goes on to say that dealing with the past should put victims first. He is then asked what his father thinks of the letters. Tom Elliott and Katherine Stone's final remarks. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6626



Date Broadcast:
Fri 7th Mar 2014
Duration:
6 mins 52 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers says that the OTR scheme is over. Film report on her speech. She admits that 38 letters were dealt with since the 2010 election. No letters have been issued by the NIO since December 2012. Then Gareth Gordon asks her about what happens to the cases currently in the system. She says that that is up to the judge's Inquiry. The UK government sees this scheme as being at an end. She adds that the letters do not confirm immunity. Recipients and the public should know that the letters were not 'get out of jail free cards' and that due process will operate in the normal way. Then Ian Paisley Jr's views, Then Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey's comments, the Peter Robinson's comments. Dissident republicans' letter bombs have been intercepted in postal sorting offices in Derry and Lisburn. They were addressed to Maghaberry prison. Film report with reaction from SDLP MP Mark Durkan, then the DUP's Paul Givan. Then a joint statement from Martin McGuinness condemned the incident. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6627



Date Broadcast:
Mon 10th Mar 2014
Duration:
8 mins 46 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Ballymoney RIR soldier Jeff McNeill (32) has been found murdered in his barracks. Film report from Shropshire Barracks. A 23 year old serving soldier has been arrested on suspicion of murder. Family comment, then a comment from the Mayor of Coleraine. In courts judges have quashed a decision to halt criminal proceedings against two men and a woman in connection with the murder of Robert Hamill in Portadown in 1997, who was beaten to death by a loyalist mob. Film report names the 3 as former RUC member Robert Atkinson, his wife Eleanor and Kenneth Hanvey (62). All three deny perverting the course of justice. Next report is from Stormont, where the TUV's Jim Allister has hosted an event to mark European Day for Victims. Film report shows the widow of RUC member of John Proctor address the audience about the conviction of Seamus Kearney for her husband's murder in 1981. June McMullen calls it 'like heaven'. Other speakers include Tom Boswell, who was injured in an INLA punishment attack in 1978. He comments, then Michelle Nixon's brother Grant Weir (ex-UDR) who was seriously injured tells his story. He was injured by the PIRA in 1976. Michelle comments on injured victims being forgotten. Then Jim Allister says that he wants a new definition of a victim. Next, Ken Reid's analysis of today's events at Stormont, with comments from UUP leader Mike Nesbitt and Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly on the Haas proposals on flags etc. The preview of politicians going to the USA for St Patrick's Day. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6628



Date Broadcast:
Mon 10th Mar 2014
Duration:
7 mins 33 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Stormont Today
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers covers the European Day for Victims of Terrorism at Stormont today, hosted by the TUV's Jim Allister, where MLAs heard June McMullen talk about the murder of her RUC Reservist John Proctor by the PIRA in 1981 as he left the Mid-Ulster Hospital after visiting his new-born son. In December 2012 Seamus Kearney was convicted of the murder on the basis of DNA evidence found on a cigarette butt. She gives an emotional account of events at the time of the murder and expresses her joy at Kearney's conviction 32 years later. Then Political Editor Stephen Walker talks about how her testimony is a reminder of the pain of victims and how much more work needs to be done on victims-related issues. He also comments on a 17-page document released today by the UUP detailing their thoughts on the issues of flags, parading and the past. On flags they want the union flag flown on all government buildings. On parades they want a voluntary, rather than a legal, code of conduct and they are critical of the Haas proposals for a new Historical Investigations Unit. Then in an interview Mike Nesbitt gives his view on the use of Supergrass trials, saying that they don't work. Stephen Walker then gives details of Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly's reaction to the UUP document. He calls it fantasy politics. The DUP reaction was also critical of the UUP views on flying the union flag. The leaders' discussion on the Haas proposals have stopped since the news about the OTR letters and the collapse of the John Downey trial.
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6629



Date Broadcast:
Tue 11th Mar 2014
Duration:
5 mins 53 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in Washington D.C Richard Haas gives evidence to a Congressional Committee on dealing with Northern Ireland's past. In a film report he says that he only found out about the OTR letters when the story broke two weeks ago. He also says that he might publish his own set of proposals on flags, parading and the past. Tracy Magee explains what the Foreign Affairs Select Committee meeting was all about and Haas' evidence today, and his comments about the OTR scheme. He also says that not dealing with the past may create the possibility of community tensions in the future. In other news a bomb alert in Moyard Parade in west Belfast has led to homes being evacuated. Film report. In England a soldier is still being questioned about the murder of RIR soldier Jeff McNeill from Ballymoney. Film report. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6630



Date Broadcast:
Tue 11th Mar 2014
Duration:
11 mins 45 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Stormont Today
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers introduces the topics on tonight's programme. Then he talks to Sam McBride of the Newsletter about the government's announcement today that Lady Justice Hallett will lead the inquiry into the OTR letter scheme. He also comments on the terms of the inquiry announced at Westminster today by the Northern Ireland Select Committee and says that the judge-led inquiry looks weak compared to it. Also, the Stormont Conduct Committee finds that Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly wasn't glorifying terrorism by attending last summer's republican event in Castlederg. Next report covers Northern Ireland Justice Minister David Ford (Alliance) answering five questions on what he knew or didn't know about the OTR scheme at Stormont Question Time today. He says that he was unaware of any of it until the John Downey case. He also answers questions on the National Crime Agency and the opposition to it from the SDLP and Sinn Fein. Next report is on the OFMDFM meeting with the Victims' commissioner Kathryn Stone and Dr Malcolm McKibbin, the head of the Northern Ireland Civil Service. The meetings were chaired by the UUP's Mike Nesbitt. He questions the Civil service chief on the slowness of questions being answered by the Civil Service. Then Kathryn Stone answers questions on the effect of the OTR scheme on victims. She says that they feel betrayed and that they have denied access to justice. Then Sam McBride gives his comments on Richard Haas' comments in Washington about Northern Ireland politicians and dealing with the past as Martin McGuinness and Peter Robinson arrive in Washington. (Tuesday)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6631



Date Broadcast:
Tue 11th Mar 2014
Duration:
32 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
The Hidden Scandal: Housing Fraud
Description:
Enda McClafferty investigates the housing benefit scams that are denying the homeless a home and costing millions each year. The role of loyalist paramilitaries in Belfast and dissident republicans in Derry is highlighted. Programme begins with details about the long waiting lists for social housing, last year's £200 million spent building new homes, a new housing estate in Derry is profiled. But is the only solution to build new houses? Enda McClafferty says that there are thousands of empty homes in Northern Ireland but they are occupied by fraudsters. It is known as tenancy fraud. Kieran Donnelly, the Auditor General for Northern Ireland says that no cases were reported to him in Northern Ireland yet but that it is a big problem in England. An investigation in Northern Ireland has uncovered 2500 properties that are illegally occupied. Then a profile of the case of Darren Keegan and his family, who have been waiting for a place to call home for 10 years. They are one of 40,000 families in the queue for a home. Darren comments on the Short Lets that they have had to use and that they will have to move again for the fourteenth time. The family comments on the stress and the social instability that the situation causes. The fraudsters use the address to scam the benefit system. They don't even occupy the house, yet it has never been reported by the Housing Executive to the Auditor. In Derry Kevin Barrett, a former Housing Executive Manager, talks about the scale of the fraud that he witnessed. In Northern Ireland 60% of all rent for private properties is paid for by housing benefit. University of Ulster's Professor Paddy Gray comments on those figures, saying that that is £250 million per year to private landlords. Enda McClafferty then profiles the poor conditions in Jean Kennedy's house, which costs £400 per month. Then Eleanor McEvoy of Budget Electricity talks about the number of empty social housing properties that they come across when doing a meter readings. A film crew then follows a meter reader in the Belfast area. They come across three empty properties, but two of them are registered as having social housing tenants. In three weeks the meter man found 160 empty houses. Then Gerry Flynn, the Housing Executive Director of Landlord Sector answers questions on this situation and the legal restrictions on the Housing Executive. Joan Kennedy's housing situation is profiled by an environmental officer. The landlord blames the family's lifestyle. The Keegan family's distress at having to move is shown. Then Enda McClafferty gives some information on how the housing points system works in Northern Ireland, with intimidation at the top of the points system. Gerry Flynn explains their caution on this issue. In Derry two dissident republicans got homes after saying that they were being intimidated. Thomas McCourt of Rosemount Resource Centre gives details of the cases. Then the DUP's Gregory Campbell gives his views. Then in Belfast Enda McClafferty interviews an un-named landlord who owns a property in the Village area. He has to pay loyalist paramilitaries £40.00 per month. Then former police fraud investigator comments. Then the landlord of the Village property gives more details of the fraud involved in his rental, with the paramilitaries sub-letting his property, whereby he received the state housing benefit. He eventually sold the house. Yet the Auditor General says that there has never been a single case of housing benefit fraud reported in Northern Ireland. However, Gerry Flynn says that it is a priority for the Housing Executive. He outlines his plans, as does Cameron Watt of the Federation of Housing Associations. It is believed that 2500 homes are taken by fraudsters, but Kevin Barrett thinks that it is more, possibly 18000 homes. In his interview Gerry Flynn refutes these figures.
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6632



Date Broadcast:
Wed 12th Mar 2014
Duration:
10 mins 18 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines. The final bill for the PSNI hearing loss claims will be £250 million. Film report on £8,500 claims with 2000 claims still to be settled. Report from Vincent Kearney gives detailed breakdown of costs, with comments from Justice Minister David Ford (Alliance). In courts RIR soldier M Wilson (22) and Gareth McKinney admit the manslaughter of Lee Smith (35) in 2010 who they beat to death. In Washington Richard Haas has told a Congressional hearing that violence may re-emerge in Northern Ireland if the legacy of the troubles is not dealt with. Film report with Mark Devenport covers his views on the OTR letters. Then Martina Purdy reports on how Haas' remarks were received, with comments from the UUP's Danny Kennedy. In England Lt Corporal Farrell was charged with the killing of Ballymoney RIR soldier Jeff McNeill at the weekend. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6633



Date Broadcast:
Thu 13th Mar 2014
Duration:
6 mins 13 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in the USA Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness call Richard Haas' comments yesterday unhelpful. Film report with SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell's reaction, then Robinson & McGuinness' view on meeting Vice-President Joe Biden and not President Obama, and whether or not they feel that they are being snubbed. Then Martina Purdy's analysis of events in the US. Tony Blair's Chief Negotiator during the 1998 Good Friday Agreement talks stands by his 2008 assessment that the DUP knew all about the OTR scheme.
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6634



Date Broadcast:
Thu 13th Mar 2014
Duration:
33 mins 53 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers interviews former Labour Prime Minister Tony Blair's Chief of Staff Jonathan Powell, who was described as a key architect of the peace process and has been both credited with and blamed for the On The Runs letters policy. They discuss peace, the past and political deadlock. Firstly mark Carruthers asks him about his views on Richard Haas' comments in Washington that violence may return to the streets of Northern Ireland. Powell agrees, calling it a sensible comment. He says that sectarianism and the associated underlying problems must be addressed. Powell says that people around the world are interested in the peace process but that no one thinks that the peace agreement solves everything. Above all there is still the problem of sectarianism. He refers to the issue of peace walls. Powell gives credit to Richard Haas for his proposals on flags, parading & the past and blames local politicians for their failure to sign up to the deal. Powell highlights the difference between obtaining a peace deal and the peace-building that follows it to end generations of hatred. He doesn't accept that there is a vacuum in Northern Ireland, but that loyalists feel that they have been left behind by the political process. He mentions the loss of David Ervine's leadership. He also questions loyalist anger at republicans getting OTR letters. Powell says that the media misled everyone. The OTR letters issue was on the table since 2001, and at Weston Park but that a deal was never achieved. He says that OTR letters were an administrative letter to tell people that they were not wanted. It is not a pardon or an amnesty. Powell says that he doesn't want to stir up Unionist politicians now, but in his 2008 book he says that the DUP's Ian Paisley knew about the OTR scheme, but told Tony Blair that he was ok with it as long as it was said that it was done on David Trimble's watch, and Powell stands by what he says in the book. He rejects Peter Robinson's assertion that the DUP did not know about the scheme, and says that his claim is based on notes and government papers from the time. On the 13 Royal Pardons issued, including one for the 1996 London Docklands bombing, he accepts that it was difficult for unionists to accept but that in a peace process compromises were necessary he says. This was not a case of 'constructive ambiguity' as in the case of arms decommissioning, but that the issue of OTRs were not dealt with in any deal. John Downey says that he was freed because of a PSNI mistake, not any letter of amnesty. Powell then says that the Cameron inquiry was the right thing to do. He gives his opinion on other inquiries announced and says that he will give evidence if required. He hasn't spoken to Tony Blair about the OTR issue. Next topic discussed by Mark Carruthers is the expensive trip to the USA by Northern Ireland politicians. The UUP's Mike Nesbitt asks why 5 MLAs from one Stormont Assembly Committee had to go to Washington to study ethics. Gareth Gordon's report looks at Northern Ireland politicians' long relationship with the folks on Capitol Hill. For 20 years St Patrick's Day was 'the big one'. UDP's Gary McMichael recalls why they went. He doubts that they still need to go. Then Catherine McCartney recalls the trips for three years after their brother Robert's murder. She says that it was all for public consumption. Then Allister Ross, one of the 3 DUP MLAs going to the USA for ethics training, explains why he thinks that this is necessary. Then a film clip of a committee meeting, and the UUP's Mike Nesbitt outlines his doubts about the trip. Next report comes from Martina Purdy, who is in Washington. She outlines Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness' reaction to Richard Haas' comments about the possibility of violence returning to Northern Ireland, and also the reaction of the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell. Film clip shown of Peter Robinson's reaction, saying that he is optimistic that a deal can be done on flags etc. Then Martin McGuinness' comments about their economic trip to California and details of their meeting with Vice-President Joe Biden tomorrow. Then in the studio Alex Kane and Paul McFadden comment on Jonathan Powell's comments on OTRs. Both are critical, saying that he is 'dancing on the head of a pin'. Then they comment on Richard Haas' views about a return to violence. Lastly a short film clip on MLAs views on Stormont as a soap opera. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6636



Date Broadcast:
Fri 14th Mar 2014
Duration:
8 mins 15 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in west Belfast an under-car booby trap bomb has been found on the Black's Road. It had fallen off a car. In Killough a man is rescued at the lighthouse. Film report. Local politicians give their reaction to the death of veteran Labour MP Tony Benn (88) who was a supporter of Sinn Fein. Film report. In the US, Obama says that he is disappointed that the Haas talks failed as he meets Irish Premier Enda Kenny. Film report covers Joe Biden's comments at a dinner last night, with Robinson and McGuinness comments. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10210
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6635



Date Broadcast:
Sat 15th Mar 2014
Duration:
3 mins 37 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Dissident republicans launched a bomb attack on the PSNI on the Whiterock Road in west Belfast. There were no serious injuries. A Phillipino family's car was hit by debris. Film report with interview with Mr & Mrs Santos, then the Police federation's Terry Spence's views. In Ardoyne the body of Eamon Ferguson (33) was found in a flat. Two men have been arrested. Film report with Caral Ni Chuilin (Sinn Fein) comments. (Sat 5.30pm)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6637



Date Broadcast:
Mon 17th Mar 2014
Duration:
22 mins 45 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
St Patrick's Day Special
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of today's St Patrick's Day parades across Northern Ireland and in Dublin presented by Alison Fleming in Downpatrick and she begins by profiling that town's parade. She talks to some locals and local councillor Gareth Sharvin from Down Council and South Down SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie. Then a film report from Judith Hill in Belfast using the same format with film clips of parade floats and interview with Belfast Sinn Fein Lord Mayor Mairtin O'Muilleoir and carnival organiser David Boyd, the Graham Harris of the Major Sinclair Memorial Pipe Band, plus some unnamed foreign tourists. Then a report from Dublin with Mark Mallett, where the theme is 'Let's Make History'. Spanish, Indian & Nigerian tourists interviewed, then some Dubliners. Film of President Michael D Higgins and Tanaiste Eamon Gilmore shown. Then comments from more tourists from the USA and The Philipines. Next report from Paul Reilly in Armagh. Film clips of parade and Cardinal Sean Brady. Then the views of Sara McGeary of Armagh City Council and the city's Lord Mayor Councillor Robert Turner. Then report from Newry with Mayor Michael Ruane, along with local residents' views. Next report from Derry from Mark McFadden. Film clips of the parade and the food stalls at the Guildhall for the Food Festival which will last three days. The city's Mayor Gary Middleton (DUP) comments, then Martin McGuinness' views, then Chef of the Year Ian Orr's views, then Jonah Atos of the North West Philipino community, then Kathleen Tracy of the Recycled Teenagers Group, then Alison Fleming finishes with some of the images of the day. (Mon 10.35pm)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
536
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6638



Date Broadcast:
Wed 19th Mar 2014
Duration:
7 mins 53 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
A video clip has come to light of PSNI officers moving a drunk woman from the road and leaving her lying in a bus lane. Film report from Derry with reaction from Sinn Fein councillor Elisha McCallion. Then additional footage shows the PSNI arresting the woman's partner minutes earlier. You can see the young woman running at the police car, and then the police leaving her in the bus lane, then civilians help her up off the bus lane. Then assistant Chief Constable George Hamilton gives his reaction to the incident. Its bad news for the police he says. In Belfast courts two men, Louis Maguire (26) and Chris Power (31) have been charged with the murder of Eamon Ferguson in Ardoyne on Saturday. In Derry a shot was fired at the window of a home. A dissident republican group calling itself the IRA has admitted the mortar attack on a PSNI vehicle on the Whiterock Road in west Belfast on Friday night. Film report. It has been announced that councillors will get a pay-rise of £4500.00 if elected to the new 'super-councils' after May's elections. Film report with Mark Devenport's analysis, and details of all UKIP candidates, which has published its manifesto for the elections. Among its policies is that the union flag should fly permanently from all public buildings. Film report covers its other anti-immigration policies with comments from councillor Henry Reilly. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6639



Date Broadcast:
Thu 20th Mar 2014
Duration:
6 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, the Alliance Party Euro candidate Anna Lo has angered unionists by saying that she favours a united Ireland. Film report plays her remarks. She calls Northern Ireland 'atypical' and says that she is anti-colonial. Then the DUP's Arlene Foster denies that Northern Ireland is a colony and calls on Anna Lo to apologise. The UUP's Reg Empey says that a vote for the Alliance is a vote for a united Ireland. Then Alliance Party statement, then former Alliance MLA Seamus Close says that he feels that Anna Lo has damaged the party electorally in east Belfast for Naomi Long. Then Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey's views. In Derry Brigid Mongan, the drunk woman left lying in a bus lane, calls for the officers to be sacked. Film report includes a vox pop of Derry people on the incident. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6640



Date Broadcast:
Thu 20th Mar 2014
Duration:
10 mins 39 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Pathologist from the UK, Dr Nat Cary, has issued a report on the body of murder victim Lorraine McCausland, killed in 1987 by loyalists who beat her to death. The new report says that she may have been raped first. A film report reviews news footage from the time of the murder in Ballysillan and interviews Lorraine's sister Cathy McIlvenny, who has campaigned for years for justice. Then a profile of Nat Cary with details of other cases he has worked on, followed by the main findings of his report, which was commissioned by the family. Then Cathy says that they killed her because they raped her. They were paramilitaries but it wasn't a political killing. Family solicitor Padraig O'Muirigh gives his reaction, criticising the original shameful police investigation. Lorraine's son Craig was two years old when she was murdered. He was killed by the UVF in 2005. No one has been charged with either killing. Cathy says that the family has been let down by the justice system. The family want a new police investigation. Retiring Deputy Chief Constable Judith Gillespie gives Marc Mallett an interview on her 32 years' service, and the changes that she has seen in policing in that time. She begins by talking about deciding to resign after the world Police & Fire Games in Northern Ireland. She accepts that sometimes police officers get things wrong but she highlights accountability. She talks about her pride in the RUC but accepts that changes had to be made. She rejects the loss of colleagues who were killed or injured but never considered giving it up. She says that she is leaving with a sense of completion. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6641



Date Broadcast:
Thu 20th Mar 2014
Duration:
9 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Curruthers interviews the Alliance Party leader and current Justice Minister David Ford about the party's European election candidate Anna Lo's comments about favouring a united Ireland and calling Northern Ireland 'colonial' and 'artificial'. He begins by reviewing Anna Lo's comments in the Irish News, then David Ford explains why Anna Lo isn't doing this interview. He recalls about how, two years ago, at a speech at party conference he talked about the range of diversity of backgrounds within the party. He said that some had long term nationalist aspirations, whereas others had unionist aspirations. Nobody batted an eyelid then yet today it's a big news story. He says that she has talked to Anna Lo today and that she is committed to creating a united community in Northern Ireland and admits that she won't see a united Ireland in her lifetime. Mark Carruthers highlights her use of the term 'artificial', and describing Northern Ireland as 'colonial', which has caused unionist anger. He quotes Arlene Foster demanding an apology. David Ford then recalls unionists calling him a 'little Nero', who was a mass murderer. He says that it was striking that the unionists got most annoyed about the use of the word colonial than them comparing him to a mass murderer. David Ford then says that Seamus Close's remarks show that he is out of touch with the party at ground level. He rejects the view of unionists that the Alliance wants to 'water down' Northern Ireland's Britishness and that is why they voted for the flying of the union flag only on designated days. He says that the Alliance vote was to strike a balance in a divided city. He explains the Alliance Party position on a united Ireland. He says that Anna Lo's comments won't damage her Euro chances, or Naomi Long's in east Belfast and that she retains his full support.
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6642



Date Broadcast:
Thu 20th Mar 2014
Duration:
25 mins 34 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
TG4
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Eagoir (Wronged)
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
This programme is presented by Michelle Ni Phaidin in Irish with English subtitles and deals with cases of people who were victims of injustice by the state, fought their cases through the courts and eventually cleared their names. Tonight's episode is the case of Liam Holden, who at the age of 19 was the last person to be sentenced to death in the UK. He was falsely accused of killing Paratrooper Frank Bell (19) in Ballymurphy in 1971. The programme begins with Liam O' Maolcluiche, a Ballymurphy resident. He recalls the events of 1971, the massacre of 11 civilians by British army paratroopers. Also the comments of Maire Andrews, another resident, with old film clips and the views of journalist Seamus McKinney. Then an interview with Liam Holden, who recalls his early life in Ballymurphy. He says that he was one of the lucky ones who had a job. He was a chef in the Chimney Corner Inn. Then lecturer in forensic psychology Caoite O' Chairda comments on the fears of young British soldiers serving in Northern Ireland at that time. In 1972 soldier Frank Bell from Liverpool was shot in Belfast and died from his injuries three days later. He was the 100th soldier killed that year. Journalist Robert McMillen comments. Four weeks later Liam Holden was arrested by the army. They didn't take him to a police station, but to their army base in a local primary school. Liam recalls the abuse and the interrogation he suffered, including simulated drowning techniques. They wanted him to admit to killing Frank Bell. Guardian journalist Ian Cobain calls it waterboarding. Then psychologist C O'Chairda comments on the effects of this type of torture. Liam Holden kept denying the charge despite continued waterboarding. They also put pillow cases over his head. They also took him in a car to Glencairn, a loyalist area, where they cocked a gun and told him they would kill him and blame it on loyalists if he didn't admit to the killing. Sinn Fein's Seanna Walsh says that they did the same to him. Liam says he believed that they were actually going to kill him so he signed a confession. He believed that once it went to trial he would be acquitted because of the torture used against him. The family wanted a quick trial and Liam released. The trial began in April 1973. Liam recalls that the judge wouldn't accept his friends' evidence that he was playing cards with them. He was found guilty by the jury on the basis of his confession and sentenced to death. He recalls his family's shock. The programme then profiles the death cell, and the watch kept on condemned men. Liam recalls the effects of the events back then on life today. When Northern Ireland Secretary William Whitelaw banned hanging Liam was given a life sentence for a crime that he didn't commit. Liam decided to just get on with doing his time. Knowing he was innocent kept him strong. He served his time as an ordinary prisoner. He recalls not telling anybody about what he was in for. In 1989 he was released on licence and recalls not being able to get a job anywhere because of his conviction. He missed out on marriage and children. His life was ruined because of something he didn't do. He comments on the gap in his life. When the law changed Liam was able to have his case reviewed. His signed conviction was his big obstacle but defence lawyers showed that two paratroopers named Milton & Rowntree broke questioning regulations by holding him for more than four hours. This cast doubt on his confession and the case was dismissed. Liam gives his feelings. He could have been killed. He is still angry. The soldiers never admitted torture.
DVD No.
D10220
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6643



Date Broadcast:
Sat 22nd Mar 2014
Duration:
3 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
An alleged former senior IRA member Ivor Bell (77) has been charged in relation to the 1972 killing & murder of mother of 10 Jean McConville. Film report with 1972 film clips. The evidence against him is based on the Boston Tapes interviews. At the Alliance Party conference Anna Lo got a standing ovation from delegates as she spoke about her recent united Ireland remarks. David Ford calls his party the radicals in Northern Ireland. (Sat 5pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6644



Date Broadcast:
Sat 22nd Mar 2014
Duration:
4 mins 33 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of charges against veteran republican Ivor Bell (77) in relation to the kidnap & murder of Jean McConville in 1972. Film report on the Boston College interviews and the evidence against him along with comments from Michael McConville. At the Alliance Party conference Anna Lo says that her goal is not a united Ireland but a united Northern Ireland. Film report covers David Ford's comments about his 'radical' party. (Sat 6pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6645



Date Broadcast:
Mon 24th Mar 2014
Duration:
12 mins 54 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams has asked his solicitor to find out whether he is wanted by the PSNI in connection with the murder of Jean McConville in 1972. Sharon O'Neill reports on the case to date and the Boston College tapes issue. In a statement Gerry Adams denies any involvement in the Jean McConville case. Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness both attended the funeral in Newry of industrialist Edward Haughey, who died in a helicopter crash last week. Film report from Newry Cathedral with comments from Canon Francis Brown. An appeal for truth and justice from 36 families has been delivered to Richard Haas and the United Nations in New York. The families views are on a videotape made by the victims' group Relatives for Justice called 'Time for Truth'. Film clip shown then in the studio Mark Thompson of RFJ and Jim Clinton talk about their campaign and what they hope to achieve. Jim Clinton's wife was killed by loyalists in 1994. He explains what happened that night with a video clip from 1994. He says that if he was told the truth then he would accept Theresa's killers getting an amnesty. Mark Thompson defends the human rights of IRA volunteers shot dead when they could have been arrested. He also says that there is an appetite for truth within the unionist community that is not reflected politically. Next a report from Stormont about the fall-out between Sinn Fein and the UUP over the Haas proposal talks. Marc Mallet talks to Tracy Magee about the leaders' talks and Martin McGuinness' criticism of Mike Nesbitt, the Nesbitt says that Sinn Fein are acting in bad faith. Tracy Magee says that there will be no progress on the past until after the judge's inquiry into the OTRs. In Stormont tomorrow the Justice Committee will question Civil Servant N Perry about his knowledge of the OTRs as he worked for the Northern Ireland Office. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6646



Date Broadcast:
Tue 25th Mar 2014
Duration:
14 mins 51 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Controversy follows news that the judge investigating the OTR issue will not investigate everyone who got a letter in detail. Film report from Tracy Magee reviews events since the John Downey case collapsed and the appointment of Lady Justice Hallett to head an inquiry. She profiles a letter from the NIO to the Attorney General saying that the judge will review a sample of cases and that the judge won't have to make fresh decisions on any of the OTRs. Peter Robinson insisted today that all of the cases will be reviewed. He says that the PSNI are reviewing all 228 OTR cases. Then Martin McGuinness says that the letters are still lawful and Jim Allister says that the inquiry is a whitewash. Meanwhile at Stormont top Justice Department official Neil Perry is quizzed by the Justice Committee about his knowledge of the OTR scheme. He says that he knew of the scheme but that he didn't know if the scheme had continued after policing and justice powers were devolved. Then in the studio Paul Clark interviews Kier Starmer, the former Director of Public Prosecutions in England about the John Downey trial collapse and the PSNI mistake in issuing him with a letter saying that he was not wanted. He comments on the impact that this might have on policing. In the Republic Garda Commissioner Martin Callahan has resigned after a series of controversies in recent weeks, including conversations in Garda stations being bugged. Journalist John Mooney gives an update on the situation and the pressure on Justice Minister Alan Shatter TD. In other news, 3 men have been arrested over the 1994 UVF murder of Eamon Fox and Gary Convey in north Belfast. In the courts Tom McWilliams (48) from Northwick Drive gets 12 years for moving a gun after dissident republicans fired at police on 13/7/12. He had already been convicted of murder during the troubles. Six members of Constable Anderson Flute Band have been convicted of defying a Parades Commission ruling not to play music outside St Patrick's Catholic Church in August 2012. Film report. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6647



Date Broadcast:
Tue 25th Mar 2014
Duration:
30 mins 4 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
The Letter of the Law
Description:
This programme is an investigation into the John Downey Hyde Park bombing trial and the On The Run (OTR) letter that was given to John Downey by the PSNI by mistake as police still wanted to question him about the bombing, but also about the murder of two UDR soldiers near Enniskillen in 1972. Programme begins with film clip of Cynthia Johnston, whose father was one of the UDR soldiers killed. In the interview she says that she wants answers about her father's death. She tells Jennifer O'Leary about how the killing affected her early life, then they visit the scene of the explosion. She says that she is not bitter but she does want justice. A re-enactment of A Johnston (32), J Eames, Ronald Glass (32) and Robert Cranston on foot patrol is shown, then Robert Cranston in an interview talks about the bond between them. In August 1972 the four men are on a foot patrol on the Irvinestown Road. He recalls them approaching a car around midnight. An army lorry approached coming from Enniskillen. The bomb exploded as it passed the car. He describes the scene as they searched for Johnston and Eames. Old film clips of the scene shown. He gives his views on it, and says that he thought that the case had gone cold. Jennifer O'Leary reveals that John Downey's fingerprints were found on tape on the batteries used in the bomb, as revealed in a HET report into the bombing. In July 1980 two Garda were shot dead in Roscommon and fingerprints of the IRA suspects were given to the RUC and English police, who matched a set of prints to John Downey's prints from Enniskillen, but the RUC didn't try to extradite Downey. Cynthia Johnston gives her reaction the film clips showing the IRA's bombing campaign in England in the early 1980s, including Harrods and Hyde Park. Although wanted in Northern Ireland in 1982 Downey travelled to England. That year four soldiers were killed and 23 people were injured in Hyde Park. Police found John Downey's fingerprints on parking tickets for the bombers care, and an eye-witness described him. Ten months after the bombing police released a photo-fit picture of Downey. 1984 saw the IRA bomb the Tory party conference in Brighton. Police wanted Downey in connection with the Brighton bombing, but say now that he is not wanted for Brighton. Then more reaction from Cynthia Johnston, who feels that Downey should have been arrested for the 1972 UDR murders, which would have stopped the Hyde Park bombing. Jennifer O'Leary then gives details of RUC attempts to have Downey extradited after he became high profile, but not in 1972 and the reasons for their lack of effort. The question is then asked as to why he was sent a letter in 2007 saying that he wasn't wanted? Others now feel that their relatives' killers may also have gotten OTR letters. Last week fifty victims' relatives from here went to England where they met Julie Hambleton of the Birmingham pub bombings families. She comments on 'known terrorists' getting 'get out jail free cards'. Then Stephen Gault, whose father was killed in the 1987 IRA bombing at Enniskillen, says that he felt sick when he heard about the OTR letters. He says that two suspects for that bombing got OTR letters. Then Ann Travers, whose Magistrate father was killed in 1984, talks about the dismissal of justice. Jennifer O'Leary reviews where the OTR scheme started. After prisoner releases Sinn Fein wanted the OTR issue dealt with. Downey's name was among hundreds passed to the police. Alex Elliott, a former policeman, recalls the issue. In 2006/7 Downey was wanted, then in 2007 Paisley & McGuinness went into government together, and two days later Downey gets an OTR letter. Ulster University's Dr Louise Mullinder comments on the PSNI's change in attitude. Then Alex Elliott says that in late 2010 the HET wanted to name Downey for the 1972 UDR murders but reversed that view in their final report to the families. He says that the Downey case was swept under the carpet. Cynthia Johnston comments, then Ian Paisley Jr gives his views on why John Downey was arrested at Heathrow airport. He believes he was set up. Then Jennifer O'Leary looks at the question of what politicians knew or didn't know about the OTR scheme. Barrister Gavin Duffy gives his views on whether Downey can now be arrested for the UDR killings. Louise Mullinder comments on what the Hallett Inquiry is all about. Then Ian Paisley Jr says that he wants Tony Blair to explain what he was doing, then Kenny Donaldson comments. Julie Hamilton talks about the loss of faith. Cynthia Johnston comments. Alex Elliott blames politics.
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6648



Date Broadcast:
Wed 26th Mar 2014
Duration:
9 mins 36 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Veteran republican Ivor Bell (77) gets bail on charges relating to the Jean McConville murder. Film report details the evidence against him. Stormont's Public Accounts Committee has issued a report criticising the PSNI use of agency staff which re-hires former RUC officers who retired with big pensions costing the tax-payer £106 million. Film report with Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey's views, then the DUP' Jonathan Craig. PSNI Assistant Chief Constable says that things have changed now. In the studio Sharon O'Neill gives the latest on the OTR letters issue, saying that police have said they are going to review all 238 letters already issued but that this could take a year to complete. An SDLP councillor in Belfast, Pat McCarthy, has tabled a motion inviting Pope Francis to visit Belfast. Film report on his invitation and the 1979 visit to Ireland of Pope John Paul II. In the Republic the Justice Minister Alan Shatter is facing calls to resign after the Garda Commissioner resigned yesterday. Today in the Dail Alan Shatter issued an apology to Garda whistleblowers. Film report. Police have arrested another man and a woman in connection with the 1994 UVF murder of Eamon Fox and Gary Convey in north Belfast. Film report. (Wed 6pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6649



Date Broadcast:
Thu 27th Mar 2014
Duration:
8 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then in Derry Chris Torr's (29) car has been pipe-bombed in the Creggan estate. Film report with his comments, then reaction from SDLP councillor Pat Ramsey and Sinn Fein's Kevin Campbell. In the House of Commons a debate was held on the implications of the OTR letters scheme. Also in London, Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness have attended the funeral of Labour MP Tony Benn. Film report on Commons debate with Tory MP G Howarth's comments on the PSNI 'screw-up'. Some of his constituents are Bloody Sunday soldiers. After UUP councillor Jim Rodgers said that he would be opposed to a Papal visit the UUP issued a statement saying that it would be happy with a Papal visit. Film report with Jim Rodgers comments that the Pope should stay in the border area, with councillor McCarthy's reaction, then a vox pop of the public. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6650



Date Broadcast:
Fri 28th Mar 2014
Duration:
4 mins 28 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the PSNI have found and defused a mortar bomb on Belfast's Glen Road. A man (22) has been arrested. Film report with Sinn Fein MLA Rosie McCorley's reaction. In Dublin Declan Smith, a man with well-known dissident republican connections has died a week after being wounded in a shooting incident. Film report saying that he was wanted in Belfast for the murder of two men in 2007. In court James Smith (48) has been charged with the 1994 UVF murder of Eamon Fox and Gary Convey in north Belfast. He has previously served a sentence for murder. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6651



Date Broadcast:
Mon 31st Mar 2014
Duration:
6 mins 45 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In Larne 100 loyalists have went on the rampage and wrecked three houses. Film report on a feud motive for the attacks with Assistant Chief Constable George Hamilton's reaction to the South East Antrim UDA's actions, the DUP's Sammy Wilson and Sinn Fein's Oliver McMullan's views. In Strabane a bomb has been found at a golf course and defused. Film report with PSNI Chief Inspector Alan Lemon's comments, then Strabane Golf Club's Tommy Forbes' comments. Then independent councillor Eugene McMenamin's comments. In court Conor Hughes (22) from Dunmurry was charged with possession of a mortar bomb on Belfast's Glen Road last week. (Mon 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6652



Date Broadcast:
Tue 1st Apr 2014
Duration:
11 mins 5 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then after the loyalist rampage in Larne the PSNI are under pressure to justify their response. Jane Loughrey reports with comments from local community worker Jonathan Hodge on community meeting with the PSNI. Then Policing Board member Dolores Kelly (SDLP) wants the Chief Constable to review the UDA's ceasefire status. The PSNI pays £400,000 per year to informers, known as 'covert human intelligence sources'. The figures were uncovered by a UTV Freedom of Information Act request. Film report with a breakdown of the last four years' figures, then Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly's reaction, followed by the DUP's Paul Givan. In Strabane police are on high alert after two bombs are found within two days, the latest found close to houses. Film report with Chief Inspector Alan Lemon's comments, then Sinn Fein councillor Jay McAuley, then the SDLP's Patsy Kelly. Tonight Belfast City Council voted in favour of inviting Pope Francis to Belfast, but all of the unionist councillors abstained. Film report with SDLP councillor Pat McCarthy's views, then the DUP's Lee Reynolds says that the SDLP are doing this as an election stunt, the Sinn Fein's Jim McVeigh, following the UUP's Jim Rodgers denies that he has done a U-turn.
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6653



Date Broadcast:
Tue 1st Apr 2014
Duration:
59 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight Special
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Noel Thompson introduces his panel of DUP Finance Minister Simon Hamilton, Broadcasting Director Mark Hamilton, former MP & MLA Bob McCartney QC, former Victims Commissioner Patricia McBride and Sinn Fein MP Conor Murphy. People at home can text their comments and they are shown on the bottom of the screen. First question is from Aidan Hanna, a trade union organiser, who asks why there is still a climate of fear in the NHS and why are people afraid to whistleblow? Each of the panel respond then people in the audience give their views based on what they have heard. Then question 2 from John Eagleson, who is a retail assistant, who asks how can innocent victims' confidence be restored in the justice system after the On The Runs (OTR) letters scandal? Firstly Patricia McBride comments that unionist politicians knew that the scheme was happening and have misled the public as the letters were not an amnesty. Simon Hamilton calls the scheme a corruption of justice and says that unionists did not know that the scheme was happening. He is questioned on this statement. He says the DUP took Peter Hain on his word. Then the audience comments, including Stephen Gault from Enniskillen bomb families. Then Conor Murphy says that victims were wound up by the use of terms like 'get out of jail free cards' and 'amnesty'. It never was any of these things and he says that the purpose of this was to get unionists out of the Haas talks process. Bob McCartney says that the 2006 Westminster Bill would have granted OTR cover to British soldiers and that Sinn Fein wouldn't have any of it. The government then semi-secretly made an OTR deal with Sinn Fein and the DUP were guilty of wilful ignorance as they did not wish to know about it. Mark Hamilton says that he feels that the laws of the country have been damaged by this and that it's a distraction from the progress that is being made in Northern Ireland. Then in the audience Stephen Gault's wife says that Stephen was re-traumatised by the OTR revelations. Other audience questions asked as to Conor Murphy as to what he knew about the OTR scheme. Patricia McBride comments on the Victims' Commission's efforts. Bob McCartney says he wants Jonathan Powell and Tony Blair in the dock. Next question is from student Josh Norton. He asks if the consequences of not passing the welfare reform is a clear sign of Stormont's failure to deliver again. The panel gives their views, beginning with Sinn Fein's Conor Murphy explaining why they are opposed to the welfare reform bill as it is the Tory ideology to attack the less well off. Bob McCartney defends the citizens of Northern Ireland having the same cuts as the rest of the UK. Patricia McBride says that she wants to see more unclaimed benefits claimed, and working tax credit replaced by minimum wage level and big corporations to pay the tax that they are avoiding. Then Mark Hamilton on the effects of the troubles as a unique situation. He rejects chasing those who have the least whilst big businesses avoid tax. Audience members calls for banks to pay for their mistakes. Other criticise the welfare reform and the cuts. Then Simon Hamilton quotes figures in support of welfare reform but admits that he is not happy about the bedroom tax here. He says that Sinn Fein didn't support the DUP on a bedroom tax deal. Conor Murphy says that more work needs done on a bedroom tax deal. The next question is from Cathleen Bradley, a welfare rights worker. She asks when will Northern Ireland stop reversing into the dark ages on gay rights issues? Simon Hamilton objects to the use of terms like 'dark ages'. He says that Stormont has twice voted against gay marriage and talks about tolerance of other people's views and defends colleagues' use of the word 'abomination' in reference to gays. Mark Hamilton says that it is the law in the rest of the UK so why not here? Conor Murphy calls it a rights issue. The DUP reject this claim. Bob McCartney says that mainland UK allows same sex marriage so he would allow gay marriage. Audience then gets involved. A young man claims that gays are trying to enforce their views on the majority of the people. Patricia McBride says that it is an equality and human rights issue and that minority rights should be protected. Next question from Charlotte O'Hara, a music teacher from Co Antrim, who asks whether a visit from the Pope would show how far we have progressed since the Good Friday Agreement. Bob McCartney says that the Pope should come. Patricia McBride says that it is a wonderful idea. Simon Hamilton says that the new Pope is impressive but mentions the jurisdictional issue over who has invited him, then Conor Murphy comments on Jim Rodgers' comment that the Pope should go to Armagh and not Belfast. Then audience comments on the Papal visit from different perspectives. Then Mark Hamilton says that the visit would be progress and a step forward.
DVD No.
D10240
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6655



Date Broadcast:
Wed 2nd Apr 2014
Duration:
7 mins 51 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Westminster inquiry into the OTR scheme hears ex-RUC/PSNI Chief Superintendent Norman Baxter's evidence. He said that the Northern Ireland Office had a history of not prosecuting republicans. Film report in which he says that he came under pressure from Downing Street to release republican Gerry McGeough when he was being questioned about the attempted murder of a UDR soldier. Film clip shows him being questioned by Naomi Long (Alliance). He criticises Matt Baggott. A report from the Community Relations Council says that Protestant working class boys are under-achieving at school. The report was comprised of all communities across the UK and used GCSE grades as a measure of success. Catholic girls came out on top of the table. Film report with the figures and a vox pop of local boys and girls. Then John Lewis, headmaster of Newtownabbey High School, gives his reaction. Then the Community Relations Council's Paul Nolan gives his views. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10230
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6654



Date Broadcast:
Thu 3rd Apr 2014
Duration:
9 mins 8 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott is to write to former police officer Norman Baxter about his comments to the Commons OTR inquiry that Downing Street tried to pervert the course of justice by asking for the release of republican suspects. Film report covers Norman Baxter's allegations about Vincent McAnespie and Gerry McGeough in 2007, and Matt Baggott's comments on this and his apology for the collapse of the John Downey case. DUP councillor Sammy Brush, who Gerry McGeough is accused of shooting, gives his comments. Then Political Editor Tracy Magee gives her analysis of Norman Baxter's allegations. In the courts James Smith of Forthriver Link is released on bail in relation to the 1994 UVF murder of Catholic workmen Gary Convey and Eamon Fox. 3 men and 1 woman are charged with drugs offences after raids in south and east Belfast. Film report. A new Community Relations Council report says that Protestant working-class boys are under-achieving in school. Film report and interview with the report's author Dr Paul Nolan. Views from School Principal Joe McColgan and Mark Langhammer of the Association of Teachers & Lectures. (Thurs 6pm)
DVD No.
D10240
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6656



Date Broadcast:
Thu 3rd Apr 2014
Duration:
9 mins 58 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The DUP's Peter Robinson has threatened to give Stormont's powers over welfare reform back to Westminster if no deal with Sinn Fein can be reached. Film report with Peter Robinson's comments on welfare reform stalemate with the DUP's claim that £1 billion will be lost from the Stormont budget over the next 5 years if no agreement is reached. Then Sinn Fein's John O'Dowd says that Robinson is picking figures out of the air. They want the Executive to unite against Tory welfare reforms. Former PSNI Chief Constable Hugh Orde Says that he would remember if Downing Street had asked him to release a prisoner. He was responding to comments by former police officer Norman Baxter to the Westminster OTR inquiry. Film report from Mark Devenport over the allegations about Gerry McGeough's arrest over the 1981 shooting of the DUP's Sammy Brush, with Chief Superintendent Norman Baxter's remarks and Sammy Brush's reaction. Then Alliance's Naomi Long's comments. Hugh Orde says no such phone call was ever made to him in his seven years as Chief Constable. He gives evidence next week. Also today at the Policing Board Matt Baggott says that the PSNI will ask Norman Baxter to clarify his claims over Gerry McGeough. Also at the Policing Board meeting today Justice Minister David Ford said that he would never endorse any OTR scheme on his watch. The Community Relations Council has said that the conflict over the union flag at City Hall is a symptom of the shifting population in Belfast from a city with a Protestant majority to one with a now nearly Catholic majority. Film report with comments from the report's author Dr Paul Nolan. Martina Purdy's report gives the religious breakdown of the city. Dr Nolan also comments on the lack of educational achievement by Protestant working class boys, and their experience of alienation. Then PUP councillor John Kyle comments on the report and calls on Stormont to adopt it. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10240
Tape No.
537
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6657



Date Broadcast:
Thu 3rd Apr 2014
Duration:
34 mins 2 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Introduced by Mark Carruthers he begins by interviewing the DUP's Peter Robinson about his so-called 'nuclear option' regarding the welfare reform stalemate i.e. handing welfare reform powers for Northern Ireland back to Westminster. He asks him about the agreement he thought he had on welfare reform with Martin McGuinness. Robinson says that they looked at the issue for 6 to 9 months to take off the 'sharper edges' of welfare reform. They wanted the removal of the bedroom tax and the creation of a contingency fund of £30-40 million to deal with hardship cases. He says that he got approval from the DUP for the package but couldn't get Sinn Fein approval. He says that in the 11 months since then Sinn Fein never came back to him to discuss the matter further. He says that it is now too late for any further discussion with the treasury. Robinson says that he believes that McGuinness was satisfied with the compromises in the agreement that they had, given the circumstances, but that the wider party rejected it. He says that it is too late for any further discussion with the treasury and that the cuts have already began. He says that he thinks that things have changed within Sinn Fein since the rise of the party in the Republic of Ireland. He outlines his views on this and of the problem of Sinn Fein being in government in the north and opposition in the south. Robinson says that the DUP is facing up to reality, and that if Sinn Fein does not accept the cuts then Northern Ireland will be hit hard with frontline services as funds are removed from the Northern Ireland budget. Peter Robinson rubbishes Sinn Fein's view that they should stand up to tory cuts. Robinson then says that the Executive needs to be talking about where the £100 million in cuts need to be made. He doesn't want the health department to be cut. He accuses Sinn Fein of economic illiteracy and sarcastically says that he will explain it in simple terms in case anyone from Sinn Fein is listening. Robinson explains what he means when he says he will use the 'nuclear option' in economic and political terms if the situation can't be resolved. The power over welfare shouldn't be here and should be passed over to Westminster. He also says that the DUP won't sign up to any UK budget next year ignoring the fact that Northern Ireland has a reduced budget from the UK treasury. Robinson then comments on the Northern Ireland Office's action over the OTR issue as alleged by ex-RUC officer Norman Baxter at a Westminster hearing where he said that Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams got on the phone to have Gerry McGeough released. He says that he wasn't surprised and that Gerry Adams is a very negative influence on Stormont. He says that Sinn Fein has slowed down decision-making here in case it affects Sinn Fein TD's in the Dail and he says that Sinn Fein are bringing in more hard-line people who are akin to Adams' position. He says that there is a much more pragmatic approach from Martin McGuinness, and because he is in government in the north he realises what needs to be done. He then defends the politicians here, saying that people elect politicians to do what they say they will do in their manifestos. They will do, difficult though it is. Robinson says that he has given leadership. Next topic is the report from the Community Relations Council that there has been peace here without reconciliation. It predicts trouble ahead if politicians don't manage the changing face of Belfast. Martina Purdy introduces a film report on the Peace Monitoring report and its stark conclusions. It begins with the Haas conclusions on dealing with flags, parading and the past and the cost of the marching season and the increase in peace walls. Martina Purdy then says that the Catholic population in Belfast is now 49%, and the Protestant population has shrunk to 42%. The report's author, Dr Paul Nolan, comments on how this has affected the issue around flags. A quarter of young Protestant men are jobless and he says that this is a seed bed for trouble. They risk alienation and being drawn into a cultural conflict. In north Belfast the Ulster Political Research Group (UDA linked) Gerald Solinas rejects that assumption and gives his views. Paul Nolan says that Catholic schools are providing their young people with a route out of poverty, whereas young Protestant males have no route out of their poverty. Then commentator Brian Feeney says that unionist politicians are fighting a losing battle against change. He says that their only tactic should be compromise and reconciliation but that there is no effort on their part regarding reconciliation. Then Presbyterian Minister Rev Lesley Carroll says that there are many 'quiet' peace makers. Then Ashley Holmes of Youth Initiatives comments on young people's perspectives. Then in the studio the CRC's chairman Peter Osborne is asked what they are doing to address the alienation of young Protestant working class males in Belfast. Our fears have been a fear of domination he says. The report shows that we live in a region of minorities. He explains this view and comments on the drop in shared housing estates. He says he doesn't see the evidence of a 'cultural war' on the ground, but accepts that there is a perception that it exists and that needs addressed. He says that politicians need to accept under-achievement in both Catholic and Protestant areas and that greater investment is needed in schools working in areas of deprivation. Then he is asked what the CRC thinks the government needs to do to make those feeling alienated feel more valued. He replies that squabbles at Stormont undermine people's trust in institutions. People want to see the institutions delivering results. He highlights the drop in voting figures as a result of this. Complacency and indifference are the enemies of the peace and political processes. He wants more effort on a shared future and the removal of some peace walls within ten years. Then commentators Newton Emerson and Cathy Gormley-Heenan give their views on Peter Robinson's interview on welfare reform and Gerry Adams' influence, and the CRC report on population changes in Belfast.
DVD No.
D10240
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6658



Date Broadcast:
Thu 3rd Apr 2014
Duration:
59 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
Thatcher and the IRA: Dealing with Terror
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
This documentary examines British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's strategy in dealing with the Provisional IRA (PIRA) and the discussions between her government and the PIRA's political representatives in Sinn Fein. It begins with the signing of the Anglo-Irish Agreement in November 1985, which was against all of her political instincts but she had been told would end the conflict in Northern Ireland. Robert Armstrong was Thatcher's lead negotiator for two years. He kept the process on track and kept unionists excluded. After opening titles the narrator gives a brief reference to Thatcher's term in office where she was either loved or hated and things like the Miners' Strike, the Poll Tax riots, ending the Cold War and the Falklands war. In Northern Ireland she failed to end the violence. Dick Spring, Tanaiste from 1982-1987, says that she was far more interested in her international image and the 'bigger issues', and felt that Northern Ireland was a security issue that just needed to be contained. Then Norman Tebbitt, Cabinet Minister from 1980-1987, recalls Thatcher replacing Ted Heath and the role of Airey Neave in securing her election as Tory leader. Then Maurice Hayes, senior Civil Servant from 1972-1987 comments. Then footage of Airey Neave, Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary of State 1974-1979 rejecting dealing with terrorists. Norman Tebbitt says that Airey Neave wanted a military solution, not a political one. Programme then profiles the effect on WWII on the thinking of both Thatcher and Neave. Sir David Goodall, Cabinet Office 1982-1987, recalls Thatcher's reference to the Sudetenland when dealing with Garrett Fitzgerald. She likened the Republic of Ireland's claim on Northern Ireland as similar to Hitler's claim on the Sudetenland. Then film clip shown of Thatcher being told of the killing of Airey Neave in an under-car booby trap bomb by the INLA in Westminster. Bernard Ingham, Tory Press Secretary 1979-1990, recalls her reaction. R Armstrong says that it increased her anti-Irish attitude. She adopted Airey Neave's policy of a military solution. Film clip of her visiting troops in Northern Ireland. Then Lord Hurd, Northern Ireland Secretary of State 1984-1985, comments on Thatcher's relationship with unionist MPs. He says she found them uphill work. Lord Powell singles out the UUP's Ken Magennis as Thatcher's favourite. He recalls their friendship. Weeks after she became Prime Minister the IRA killed Lord Mountbatten and 18 British soldiers on the same day. She could not ignore Northern Ireland now. Lord Powell comments on her reaction. She demanded that Irish Taoiseach Jack Lynch cooperate with the British on security matters. Minutes of the meeting are shown, showing that her priorities are intelligence and extradition. Michael Lillis comments on her demands, then Walter Kirwan, Irish Department of the Taoiseach 1978-2004, comments on helicopter flights over the border and extradition. Dermot Nally, Irish Civil Service 1980-1992, recalls Thatcher's fury when she was told that many people supported the IRA's aims if not their methods. In December 1979 Jack Lynch resigned and was replaced by Charles Haughey. Lord Powell says that she liked him. He was a charmer and they originally got on well. Lord Armstrong, Cabinet Secretary 1979-1987, comments on Haughey. In December 1980 the first hunger strike begins. Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams comments on the political status issue. Then Martin Mansergh, adviser to Haughey from 1980-1992, gives his views on the Thatcher/Haughey meeting during this first hunger strike. Film clip shown then R Armstrong's concerns. The first strike ends in confusion. In March 1981 a second hunger strike begins. 10 hunger strikers die. 70 killings in 7 months. Film clip shown of Thatcher's 'Last card' comments. Then Jim Prior, Northern Ireland Secretary of State 1981-1984, says that the government just let the hunger strike run its course once it had started. In public Thatcher was dogmatic but her own handwriting was seen on messages sent to prisoners. Gerry Adams says that she knew that the hunger strike could have been ended without any deaths but she rejected that. Maurice Hayes comments on the back channel contacts. Film clip of Bobby Sands' election as an MP. At the end of the hunger strike the British government conceded most of the prisoners' demands but by that stage the IRA were rejuvenated and Sinn Fein were building a political base. Martin Mansergh comments on the reasons for this. Thatcher banished her Cabinet enemies to Northern Ireland, like Jim Prior. He says that Thatcher's problems were that her two advisers, out and out unionists Ian Gow MP and Enoch Powell MP. He comments on their beliefs and influence. In 1982 Thatcher sends a task force to take back the Falklands. Haughey worked against Thatcher in the United Nations and this greatly annoyed her. It ended any further talks over Northern Ireland. Then R Armstrong recalls a conversation with Thatcher regarding Northern Ireland, where she said that if she was re-elected she would like to do something about Ireland. In June 1983 she was re-elected, and Garrett Fitzgerald succeeded Charles Haughey. Then a film about the Hyde Park bombing and Thatcher's reaction to it. She rejects Fitzgerald's invitation to talks. Noel Barr from the Department for Foreign Affairs recalls his reaction. R Armstrong says that Thatcher could never grasp why nationalists felt alienated in Northern Ireland. Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams comments on alienation. Then Martin Mansergh and R Armstrong comment on Sinn Fein's electoral growth since the hunger strikes. Garrett Fitzgerald was warned about this also and asked M Lillis to contact R Armstrong in London on the security issue. Both men recall the conversation. Thatcher agreed to open talks but not involve the Northern Ireland Office. She used Armstrong & Goodall for negotiations. They were at the heart of the British power system. M Lillis recalls their security knowledge. Then in October 1985 the Brighton bomb kills 5 people. Norman Tebbitt recalls Thatcher's comments on TV. Sean Donlon, Department of Foreign Affairs 1978-1987, says that it hardened her resolve. O Goodall recalls the IRA's statement, then Gerry Adams calls it legitimate action. Garrett Fitzgerald's New Ireland Forum proposed three options for all-island relationships. All three were rejected. Garrett Fitzgerald looked to the Reagan administration in the USA for help. Sean Donlan comments on what they did. Thatcher realised that Airey Neave's idea of a military victory is unrealistic. Douglas Hurd recalls the army view, and the effect that this had on Thatcher's views. In 1985 Civil Servants had agreed a deal, but Douglas Hurd was removed as Secretary of State and new Secretary of State Tom King was horrified by much of the proposals. M Lillis recalls that he accepted most of it anyway. R Armstrong recalls, then Tom King recalls Ian Gow MP resigning. Then Dick Spring recalls Thatcher signing, and the unionist anger. 15 Unionist MPs resigned. Ken Magennis comments, then M Lillis says that it was a betrayal of unionists by Thatcher. R Armstrong comments on the reasons for this. Thatcher regretted signing the agreement but signed it anyway. Later Thatcher said that the Americans made her do it. Ken Magennis gives his reaction. IRA violence continues. Enniskillen bombing, British killing of 8 IRA members at Loughgall. Martin Mansergh says that the British could now kill the IRA with less criticism as they were working with Dublin. In August 1988 8 British soldiers were killed in Ballygawley. Ken Magennis recalls Margaret Thatcher asking him who he thought carried out the bombing. He named people he suspected and the SAS later killed them. The Anglo-Irish Agreement had no effect on the levels of violence says Dick Spring. Tom King says that back channel talks with the IRA began after 1985, but Gerry Adams denies this, saying that the first contact wasn't until 1990. However NIO Minister N Scott told M Lillis in the Irish Civil Service that they were in contact with the IRA. Then D Goodall says that the back channel played no part in the Anglo-Irish Agreement. Thatcher was gone by late 1990. B Ingram explains that it was Europe that finally sank her. Lord Powell recalls her reaction to the Tory party vote. Footage of her leaving 10 Downing Street. Thatcher portrayed herself as the 'Iron Lady', yet she talked to the IRA. She believed in the union, but was accused of weakening it. During her 11 years in power over 1000 people died in the troubles, but perhaps the channels that she opened with the IRA eventually helped contribute to the peace process. Sean Dolan says that she never really understood Ireland, either north or south. Then all the contributors give their final one sentence view on Thatcher.
DVD No.
D10250
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6659



Date Broadcast:
Thu 3rd Apr 2014
Duration:
53 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
A Sovereign People: The Story of the Irish Revolution
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
This documentary examines the two decades that laid the stepping stones for the foundation of the Irish state and the people's claim for sovereignty using old film clips and academics' comments. It explores the growth of the GAA, the Irish language movement and nationalist politics. It also profiles the literary and political figures at that time who were trying to de-anglicise Ireland. The position of northern unionists is also examined. The programme begins with a look at Dublin in 1900 and its position within the UK and the British Empire at that time. It is both a British and an Irish city. In it people are going about their business with no idea that violence is coming down the line. The legacy of the violence of that period is still with us today. In 1900 Ireland was filled with symbols of British sovereignty. The programme profiles the courts in Ireland at that time, and in particular the trial of Robert Emmett and his words in the dock about Ireland gaining sovereignty. His words echoed throughout the nineteenth century regarding breaking the link with Britain, from 1700 to 1918 almost two million Irish people fought for King and country. In 1900 40% of the British army was made up of Irish-born recruits. Lar Joyce comments on the building of Collins barracks in 1706. By the time of Waterloo in 1815 50% of the British army on that battlefield were Irish. Irish troops were sent to India and Africa to expand the empire and fight colonial wars. Dublin had no serious manufacturing industry, just biscuits and stout. It had 26,000 families living in slums. Catriona Crowe comments on Buckingham Street statistics. 499 people lived in 16 houses. Then profile of James Joyce's family. His mother died of cancer. Declan Kiberd comments on Joyce's view of the empire and its relationship to Ireland. Then PJ Matthews comments on the role of the Catholic Church in Ireland at the time, involved but yet mystically removed. The physical force tradition is brave but intellectually under-developed. He says that this period had a lack of a secular, civic culture but there is an emergence of a group of individuals who want to fill that gap. Then Pat Wallace comments on the year 1848 and when the famine was in Ireland there was new states being formed across Europe. Nationalism was growing and states were discovering their cultural and linguistic origins. 1893 is a crucial year in Ireland with the fall of the second Home Rule Bill. Ronan Fanning says that political activists began to look at different methods. The promotion of the Irish language, the GAA, the Gaelic League and the Cooperative Movement. They all have the common aim of making local people aware of their identity. The Dineen dictionary of Irish/English language is mentioned. A volcano of culture is about to erupt and politics is part of that. Examples of books, poets and authors is shown in a video montage on screen, then Douglas Hyde is profiled and his essay on the need to de-anglicise Ireland is a blueprint for this period. In it he says that Irish people imitate the English whenever they get a chance. Hyde was a Protestant and loved the Irish language. All of the academics give their views on why the Gaelic League was so successful, and getting the language into print was part of that with songs, poems and books. It then looks at census returns for 1901 & 1911. The big difference is that far more people have started to fill in their forms in Irish, including Sean O'Casey and his family. Then Arthur Griffiths is called the originator and the teacher of separation. He influenced everyone. Pat Wallace profiles his writings on separation in papers etc. John Redmond, the leader of the Irish Parliamentary Party, had the support of the majority of Irish people. He secured the promise of home rule for Ireland. The republican view was a minority in 1900. Academics give their view on John Redmond and the Parliamentary Party with Lord Bew's views on his roots in the British establishment. Pat Wallace says that he believed the English every time they told him anything regarding home rule. Then the voice of WB Yeats is played reading a poem. Then the importance of the Abbey Theatre figures is discussed. In this period it was the big place for entertainment and where political ideas were discussed and enacted with plays like Yeats' Cathleen Ni Houlihan and Synge's Playboy of the Western World. In the Abbey Theatre, under Yeats, they saw politics, culture and economics as going hand in hand says Declan Kiberd, referring to 1911. Catriona Crowe says that it is the last peaceful year before turmoil begins. She outlines the yearly events after that. A turbulent decade. Then Lar Joyce talks about the job skills and the economics of the time, and the poverty with many people just above starvation level. The lockout of 1912 is profiled. Out of it comes the Irish Citizens Army, established in 1913 by James Connolly. Then Pat Wallace profiles the secret group of that time, the Irish Republican Brotherhood (IRB) and Standish James O'Grady's 1909 prediction of 3 stages of the IRB. A cultural phase, a political phase and a military phase. Declan Kiberd comments on Padraig Pearse, who was Editor of the Gaelic League Journal at the time. He calls him a 'super-modern thinker'. He brought together cultural nationalism and the idea of political separation. In the north unionists believed that it was Belfast and not Dublin that was shaping Ireland's future. In 1912 the Ulster Covenant was signed. Lord Bew comments on unionist drama, then Ronan Fanning says that unionists used that time to protest very well. The Covenant's language is secular, not sectarian but Lord Bew remarks on how Presbyterian ministers said that God had told them that Home Rule was a bad idea and that Home Rule is Rome Rule'. Ronan Fanning says that British ministers Asquith, Lloyd George and Churchill are anti-Catholic and pro-unionist. Then Pat Wallace on the unionist view of Home Rule. Then PJ Matthews on the cultural clash north and south. The Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) was formed in 1912. Then the Irish Volunteers. Then Lord Bew on Bonnar Law's support of unionists. His July 1912 speech is quoted. By 1914 civil war looks imminent if the Home Rule Bill is enacted. The Curragh mutiny in the army supported unionists and their self-determination. WWI prevented civil war as everything is off the agenda apart from war with Germany. John Redmond calls for common sacrifice both north and south. 80,000 from the south join the British army. Academics are critical of Redmond's decisions. Carson joins the War Cabinet. Redmond declined. Then IRB members are profile, with photos shown, by Pat Wallace. Lar Joyce comments on Tom Clarke. August 1915 Pearse's oration at O'Donovan Rossa's funeral. He is the pivotal link between the different strands of Irish nationalism. The IRB takes over the Gaelic League. Declan Kilbard comments on this action. April 1916 proclamation and rebellion takes the British and everyone else by surprise. Pat Wallace gives his views on the reasons for it at that time. Culture was brought into the service of violence (e.g. Irish becomes the official language after independence). Declan Kilbard comments on the global significance of Ireland's independence claims which were followed by India and Pakistan. Pat Wallace comments on the wording of the proclamation, and its radical ideas compared to the prior status quo in 1916. Then General Maxwell's response is profiled. Executions changed everything. Declan Kilberd, Ronan Fanning and Catriona Crowe all comment. After 1916 Sinn Fein start to win elections. Conscription crisis helps Sinn Fein. Lord Bew comments on the motivation of the IRA from John Mitchell. Then the reasons for the civil war are discussed. Had the treaty achieved a sovereign Irish state? The commentators give their views.
DVD No.
D10250
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6660



Date Broadcast:
Fri 4th Apr 2014
Duration:
4 mins 19 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines then the political row between the DUP's Peter Robinson and Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness over welfare reform has deepened. Film report of Robinson saying McGuinness has reneged on a deal. Then McGuinness accuses Robinson of 'crossing the line'. Then analysis from Tracy Magee on the fallout. (Fri 6pm)
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6662



Date Broadcast:
Mon 7th Apr 2014
Duration:
12 mins 9 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Irish President Michael D Higgins arrives in London for the first ever visit to Britain by an Irish President. Film report begins with Martina Purdy's comments on President Higgins leaving Ireland, and also Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness, Raymond McCartney and Martina Anderson comment on why they are going. McGuinness says that it is part of the peace process and he has shook the hand of the Queen before. This time it is at a banquet at Windsor Castle. A vox pop gets the views of the people of Derry. Then Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers says she welcomes him going. She says it is progress. At Stormont the DUP's Nigel Dodds welcomes the visit, then the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell comments. Before he left Ireland President Higgins gave an interview to the BBC's Ferghal Keane about the importance of the visit in terms of Irish/British relations, and the Queen's visit to Ireland a few years ago. He says that there is still work to do in relation to the peace process. In Birmingham the families of the 21 people killed in the pub bombings in 1974 have been told that there will be no new inquiry into the bombings as there is no new evidence for a line of inquiry. Old film clip then a clip of the angry reaction of the families, who accuse the police of a cover-up. The next film report looks at the experience of Irish emigrants to Britain since the 1950s with old film clips and interviews from the 1950s and then the 1970s, with the anti-Irish nastiness following IRA bombings. Today their ancestors are big names in British culture. The number of Irish in Britain has dropped from 700,000 in the 1970s to 400,000 today. (Mon 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6663



Date Broadcast:
Mon 7th Apr 2014
Duration:
15 mins 45 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Irish President Michael D Higgins makes the first ever visit by an Irish President to England. Film report begins with his arrival in London and his press conference, then the DUP's Nigel Dodds comments on Sinn Fein attending the state dinner. Then journalists' analysis on Higgins' programme for tomorrow, and Tracy Magee's views on this historic visit and the events that have led up to it, and the significance of Martin McGuinness attending the state banquet at Windsor Castle, where a planned protest by victims of PIRA violence is planned for tomorrow night. Then a report from Mark McFadden profiles McGuinness' journey from PIRA leader to being a guest of the Queen at Windsor Castle. Film clips of historic events, then Martin McGuinness interview on the historic events that he has been involved in, including meeting the Queen. Then from London Irish Times journalist Mark Hennessy gives his views on McGuinness attending the banquet and the attitude in London. He also comments on the 2011 visit by the Queen to Ireland and what the two governments hope to achieve with this visit and whether there will be any positive impact at Stormont. The families of the 21 people killed in the 1974 PIRA pub bombings in Birmingham have reacted angrily to the decision by the West Midland police not to hold a new inquiry into the bombings. Film report with Julie Hambleton's views, then old film clips, then comments from Chris Sims, Chief Constable of West Midlands police. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6664



Date Broadcast:
Mon 7th Apr 2014
Duration:
24 mins 58 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The Insiders
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
This programme looks at the state visit of Queen Elizabeth to Ireland in 2011, with insight from key people who helped to deliver the event and their opinions on the visit's hidden tensions. It begins with a series of one sentence comments by the programmes contributors on the visit, then Pat Leahy, a journalist form the Sunday Business Post, comments on the security services deciding which airport the Queen should land at. Then Garda Commissioner Martin Callinahan's views. Pat Leahy looks back to Margaret Thatcher's visit to Ireland to meet Charlie Haughey and the last minute change to the helicopter landing because her security people didn't trust the Irish side. On 17 May 2011 Queen Elizabeth landed in Ireland. Commandant Shane Fahy of the Irish Army describes the ceremonial reception at Baldonnell, then Kathleen White from the Department of Foreign Affairs and Chief Protocol for the Queen's visit describes her duties that day. Then Bobby McDonagh, the Irish Ambassador to Britain in 2011, comments, followed by David Blevins of Sky News on the significance of the first state visit to Ireland by a British monarch in 100 years. Then Captain Laura Kenny of the Irish Army escort comments on their uniforms for that day and their ritual. Then RTE's John O'Regan comments on what his role was during the visit and making sure that the huge international broadcast went ahead smoothly. David Blevins comments on the large Sky News operation that day to cover history in the making. Then the Office of Public Works' role is explained. It had to get 14 of the 18 sites that the Queen was to visit in Ireland ready, then Commandant Fahy recounts getting the Royal party in the right place for the fly-past and the gun salute. The Garda Commissioner talks about resource monitoring dissident republicans during the visit. Arrests were made. In Dublin in 1911 King George V visited Dublin. Now at the Garden of Remembrance his grand-daughter was laying a wreath to Irish rebels. Shane Fahy comments, then RTE's producer on the symbolism of wreath-laying, then the Garda Commissioner comments on the small dissident republican protest on Dorset Street. Next, coverage of the state dinner. The Queen would make a speech at it. All the preparations are discussed by the contributors. It was a mammoth task. Head of housekeeping Chris Kieran comments, then chef Ross Peter O'Dwyer of the catering company discusses the protocol of serving the food. Waitresses Margaret and Phyllis recall serving the Queen. Film clips of the Queen's party arriving, and receiving the dinner guest at St Patrick's Hall and all taking their seats. The protocol for serving dinner is explained. The chef recalls his efforts that night. Seamus Heaney was seated at the top table. Then the Queen toasted. Film clip. K White recalls the Queen checking that her Irish was ok. Then film clip of her speaking in Irish. D Blevins comments, then contributors give their final comments.
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6665



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
15 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
First day of Irish President Michael D Higgins' state visit to Britain. Film report from outside Windsor Castle where tonight's banquet will be held shows a protest by relatives of the 1974 Birmingham pub bombings against Martin McGuinness, who will be attending tonight. Conor MacAuley shows the President's itinerary for the day in his film report, with all the pomp and splendour in a royal carriage. Then a vox pop of the people watching. After lunch the President viewed a collection of items with an Irish reference, then they went to Westminster Cathedral to view the monument to Lord Mountbatten, who was killed by the IRA in Sligo in 1979. They laid a wreath at the grave of the Unknown Soldier. Then at the Palace of Westminster He addressed the Commons & the Lords on his hopes for Irish/British relations. Then in an interview with the BBC's Jeremy Paxman Martin McGuinness explains that he will be standing to toast the Queen at tonight's banquet. He says that he will be observing the protocol. Then Stephen Walker gives his analysis of the President's speech to the Commons & Lords on Anglo-Irish relations down through the years. It was very well received and he got a standing ovation. Back in Belfast Tara Mills profiles tonight's Spotlight programme which comes from Florida and profiles the activities of Mike Logan, an IRA gun-runner, who wasn't prosecuted by the US government in exchange for information. He says that he worked with senior republican Sean Murray in importing guns into Ireland. Reporter Mandy MacAuley talks about what Jim Logan told her about Sean Murray's alleged role in gun running. Logan says that Murray told him two of his guns were used to kill two RUC men in Lurgan. Sean Murray denies the allegations. In Newry Seamus Daly was arrested yesterday and is being questioned about the 1998 Omagh bombing that killed 29 people. Then back to Windsor Castle for a film report on Anglo-Irish relations over the last 100 years. Film clips, then Professor R Burke of the University of London says that the visit has restored diplomatic immunity between the two states and he comments on the effect, if any, on the peace process. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6666



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
37 mins 12 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
n.a.
Programme Title:
The State Visit of President Higgins to the UK
Description:
Live coverage of the state banquet at Windsor Castle begins with film of guests arriving, including British Foreign Secretary William Hague and Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness at St George's Hall with a table set for 160 guests. Outside there is analysis of the event from Dr Kate Williams and footage shows more guests arriving including David Cameron, Enda Kenny and Terry Wogan. Then Siobhan Braniff comments on the support for the event among the Irish community in Britain. She also lists those from the British establishment who will be there. The panel continues to identify the guests arriving in the Great Hall, including those from the arts & culture sector. They say that it appears that Tony Blair is not on the guest list. John Major is there. 100 footmen serve the food. The DUP's Peter Robinson and Irish rugby player Brian O'Driscoll are there. Then a film clip shows the Queen and President Higgins party heading towards the banquet hall. The British national anthem is played and they all stand. Then the Queen speaks and welcomes President Higgins. She begins her speech with the history of Winsdor Castle. She says how much she enjoyed her Irish visit and Irish hospitality. She says that she welcomes the new friendship and cooperation, and trade that is growing between the two countries. She mentions laying wreaths to Irish rebels and at the WWI memorial. She mentions Irish war dead and the Irish Free State. She praises Irish people's contribution towards Britain and the historic discrimination of the past. She mentions Daniel O'Connell and modern links between Britain & Ireland. She mentions the death of Seamus Heaney and the G8 in Enniskillen, and cooperation Ireland. She calls for mutual respect and shared society in Northern Ireland. She refers to the pain of chequered history and modern goals. She says that we won't allow our past to ensnare our future. Then she toasts the President as the Irish national anthem is played, followed by President Higgins reply. He thanks them for their generosity and mentions the Irish word for shelter and generosity between Britain and Ireland. He outlines the role of the Irish in Britain over the centuries and recalls his 2011 state visit. He praises her for not shying away from mentioning the past and for addressing some of the painful moments in our nations' histories, and for her respect at sites of national importance. He also says that the past must not interfere with the potential of the future. He praises those who work for peace in Northern Ireland, including his predecessors. He says that we cannot forget those who died, or were bereaved or injured. He says he welcomes the journey to reconciliation with vigilance and care. He outlines the common global areas where Britain and Ireland face challenges. He then toasts the Queen and the people of the UK as God Save the Queen is played. Then the cameras have to leave and the journalists sum up the speeches.
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
8162



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
10 mins 43 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
RTE News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
TV coverage of Irish President Michael D Higgins' state visit to Britain, the first ever by an Irish President. It begins on a film report on his morning arrival at Windsor Castle to meet the Queen and the ceremonies around that event, including travelling around Windsor in a state carriage. Higgins inspects a guard of honour of Irish Guards. After lunch he visited some of Windsor's Irish collection. Then film report of tonight's state banquet at Windsor with clips of the Queen and Michael D Higgins speeches. Then analysis of the speeches by journalist Tommy Gorman. Then another film report covering the President at Westminster Abbey where he laid a wreath at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier and paused at the grave of Lord Mountbatten. Then later he addressed a joint session of Parliament, a rare honour for a visiting head of state. In his speech he warned of the peace process needing more attention. He also talked of the Irish living in Britain and today's Irish/British partnership. (Tues 9pm)
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
8163



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
18 mins 6 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of state banquet at Windsor Castle for Irish President Michael D Higgins begins with comments from Paul Clark, then a film report from Sharon O'Neill on a day filled with symbolism, especially so with the attendance at a state banquet of Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness and the DUP's Peter Robinson. Then a clip from the Queen's speech praising current Irish/British relations. She promises to stand with the Irish during the anniversaries of WWI and the Easter Rising. She says that Britain has been enriched by Irish immigration and toasts Ireland. In his speech President Higgins praises the warm relationship between the two countries. On Northern Ireland he says that we can never forget those who were killed, injured or bereaved during the conflict. Our duty to them is to build the peace. Outside the palace there is a protest against McGuinness' attendance. Victor Barker, whose son was killed in the Omagh bombing, comments, the Julie Hambleton, whose sister was killed in the 1974 Birmingham pub bombings, gives her views on McGuinness. Then report on the symbolism of events earlier in the day, including the state coach ride and President Higgins address to the joint Houses of Parliament. Film clip shows speaker John Bercow's welcome words. Then film clip of President Higgins reply and his toast at the banquet at Windsor Castle to the Queen and to England. Then Political Editor Tracy Magee's analysis of today's speeches, followed in the studio by comments from the Belfast Telegraph's Political Editor Liam Clarke and historian Eamon Phoenix, and from Derry Professor Deirdre Heenan, who is on President Higgins' advisory council. Eamon Phoenix calls today historic, and explains his views. Then Liam Clarke comments on McGuinness' presence. He says that this shows that he is serious about peace. Both men comment further on President Higgins speech, and the Irish words that he used. Then Deirdre Heenan calls this the 'Golden Era' of Anglo-Irish relations, and comments on the symbolism and substance of today. Then Eamon Phoenix on the shared history of the two countries, with 25% of British people having Irish ancestry, including Margaret Thatcher. He says that the two countries were 'intimate strangers' for so long but now they are close allies and intimate friends, and also partners in the peace process. Liam Clarke then comments on the lack of the sort of warmth being shown in Windsor in our own politics here. He says that Northern Ireland is a 'fault line' in Irish/British relations. Then Eamon Phoenix comments on the reaction of IRA victims to Martin McGuinness' invite to the banquet, and the problem of dealing with the past and creating a shared future. Then Deirdre Heenan says that she does not believe that Northern Ireland is a thorn in the side of Anglo-Irish relations and explains why she thinks this. She says that she is going to an event in Windsor on Thursday and is looking forward to it. Then Liam Clarke's final remarks on Irish/British relationships and where Northern Ireland fits in to that. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8164



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
6 mins 55 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Main UK news coverage of the first ever state visit from an Irish President to the UK begins with Michael Higgins at tonight's state banquet and clips of the Queen's speech on the past and the future, and Journalist Fearghal Keane reviews the rest of President Higgins' engagements today, and the symbolism of the day, including wreath-laying and addressing both houses of Parliament, along with a clip of his speech. Then Fearghal Keanes's analysis of the speeches and comments on whether they will help the peace process. (Tues 10pm)
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8165



Date Broadcast:
Tue 8th Apr 2014
Duration:
58 mins 11 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
Guns and Government
Description:
Mandy McAuley presents tonight's extended programme which is centred around Florida man Mike Logan concerning his role for gun-running for the IRA since their 1994 ceasefire. He says he was told to ignore any headlines about ceasefires and keep sending guns. He also claims that his contact within the IRA was senior west Belfast republican Sean 'Spike' Murray, who is at the heart of the peace process. He was in the Sinn Fein delegation at the Haas talks and involved in talks regarding parades disputes. Mike Logan was given immunity from prosecution by the US government for gun-running and Spotlight asks to what extent a 'blind eye' was turned in order to protect the peace process. After the opening titles Mandy McAuley meets third-generation Irish Florida man Mike Logan, who agrees to tell his story. He recalls how he was compelled by the hunger strikes and travelled to Northern Ireland for the first time in the mid-1980s. Pictures shown of him at Falls Road murals. Ten years later, a contact in NORAID gave him a number for an IRA man in Belfast. Mike Logan recalls the 'cloak and dagger' activity involved in meeting the IRA man who wanted guns. He later came to know that the IRA man was Sean Murray, who wanted guns. Then a profile of Sean Murray. He joined the IRA aged 16, was interned, and in the 1980s served seven years on explosives charges. Film clip shown of him carrying the coffin of his cousin Dan McCann, who was killed by the SAS in Gibraltar in 1988. These days he is heavily involved in the peace process. He is filmed on the panel at a cross-community meeting on sectarianism. He sits on seven peace groups and was part of the Sinn Fein Haas talks delegation. Then film clip of him at a 1995 street protest. In 1996 he reported to have become the IRA's new Chief of Staff. Then Mike Logan recalls becoming very friendly with Sean Murray, who ordered his first batch of guns in 1995, one year after the first IRA ceasefire and Bill Clinton visited Ireland. Mike Logan recalls how security-conscious Sean Murray was, to the extent that he wrote things down rather than talk. He visited Ireland two times a year and Murray would write down a list of guns that the IRA received, and would check these against what Logan had sent. Logan got the money for the guns on these visits, and he recalls how he went about buying the guns in a legal private sale. The guns were sent in toy fire engines. He recalls how one package was returned because it went to the wrong address. He recalls 'Spike's' reaction and the changes that were made. From 1995-1999 Logan bought and posted over 400 guns to the IRA. He describes the type of weapons sent. In 1996 the IRA ceasefire ended with the Docklands bombing in London. In May 1997 Tony Blair was elected. He and Northern Ireland Secretary of State Mo Mowlam wanted to restore the peace process. In June 1997 the IRA killed two RUC Constables on duty in Lurgan, John Graham & David Johnstone. NIO Minister Adam Ingram recalls it. In July 1997 Logan is back in Ireland, and Murray tells him that it was one of his guns used to kill the two RUC officers. Then Joe Digenova, Logan's lawyer, comments. Logan says that the gun used was a rare type. He recalls not feeling good about that. Film clip of John Graham's funeral and David Johnstone's family share family pictures and Rosemary Graham gives an audio interview on the effect on her family. Logan accepts responsibility but the RUC or the Public Prosecution Service won't confirm the details of the gun used. Film clip from the time shows Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams comments, then NIO Minister Adam Ingram comments on Sinn Fein's motives. Within 5 weeks the IRA ceasefire is restored and Sinn Fein are back in talks. One year later the Good Friday Agreement is signed, but all through this process the IRA continued to import guns from America. Film clip of GFA vote shown. From now on decommissioning dominates Stormont, but Mike Logan says he was told to keep sending guns. Then Conor Claxton became involved. Logan recalls being introduced to him in 1998 and Sean Murray requesting that Claxton comes to live with him in Florida so they can increase the number of guns being sent over. Claxton recruited three other people but they were careless in their methods. They bought guns openly and were seen posting parcels that were later intercepted. Within 6 months Claxton and his associates were arrested. They were Anthony Smyth and Siobhan Browne. A US news report tells the story of the arrests. In Northern Ireland Mo Mowlam was under pressure about the IRA ceasefire. News clip shows her reaction, then the UUP's David Trimble, then NIO Minister Adam Ingram recalls those events. And then the US government issued a statement saying that they was never any proven connection to the top levels of the IRA. Then Claxton's lawyer said that he had came under pressure to retract his claim that it was a sanctioned IRA operation and Claxton himself denied that it was a sanctioned operation. In August 1999 the IRA said that its ceasefire was still intact. Mike Logan comments on that, then Florida lawyer Richard Scroggs says that he was given a high-level briefing that Sean Murray was behind the operation and that the British and Irish governments distanced him from the operation in order to protect the peace process, but Adam Ingram can't recollect this. Spotlight says that Sean Murray bought a house from Claxton five months after his arrest. Mike Logan wasn't arrested by the FBI. He recalls their visits to his house. They thought he was money-laundering the operation. He wasn't gun-running but he still had 100 guns waiting to be shipped out. He recalls dumping them in the Florida swamps. Logan and Claxton had another 100 larger weapons in a storage unit in Deerfield Beach. In 2001 the IRA stopped paying rental costs. Logan recalls his panic over his fingerprints being on those guns. Meanwhile in Ireland, in Cork an IRA punishment squad is caught with one of the Florida guns. Film clip shown. Then Mike Logan involves lawyer Joseph Digenova. He recalls the police tracing the captured gun to Logan. He reads a list of guns in the storage unit that the FBI didn't know about. Logan takes the false name Mr Green and explains his plan. He wants immunity in return for handing over the guns. Digenova explains that after 3 months of immunity the US government gives Logan immunity for his five years of gun-running. He denies that he 'ratted' on anybody, but that he had to be truthful, accurate and complete in his evidence to the FBI. Logan explains his deal, that he can't be arrested. NIO Minister Adam Ingram comments on his immunity. Lawyer Digenova says that he believes that Logan's evidence was also given to the British. In December 2002 Logan's lawyers met US Justice Department and Counter-Terrorist official. They were told of the alleged involvement of Sean Murray and his comment that one of the guns had been used to kill two police officers in Lurgan. Digenova confirms that Murray's name was mentioned in Justice Department talks. In 2003 Murray was chair of the Clonard Residents' Association (CRA) and involved in the peace process. The British Government funded the CRA with £280,000 over three years. When decommissioning happened the fate of the Florida guns wasn't known. News clip on General De Chastelain's press conference question on post-1994 IRA guns, especially the Florida guns. Then Irish Minister Michael McDowell comments on why he thinks that the IRA were still gun-running. Clean guns for internal house-keeping. A film clip is shown about the killing of Real IRA member Joe O'Connor in west Belfast. His family believes the PIRA killed him. Spotlight says that the indications are that it was a Florida gun that was used to kill him. She quotes the inquest and Logan's comments on Glock guns that he sent in the post. Then the NIO's Adam Ingram comments on PIRA internal housekeeping allegations and whether the British government knew about it. Michael McDowell comments. Nowadays Logan is unemployed and has problems with drugs and alcohol, and last year spent three months in jail. He says that this is why he is telling his story now. Digenova says that he is telling the truth, Sean Murray declined an interview and says that the allegations are false.
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8166



Date Broadcast:
Wed 9th Apr 2014
Duration:
12 mins 51 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Irish President Michael D Higgins meets British Prime Minister David Cameron at No 10. Film report begins with David Cameron's comments on Anglo-Irish relations. Afterwards President Higgins visited University College Dublin and met many Irish people working there and chatted with some of them in Irish. Later, along with the Duke of York, the President reviewed the regimental colours of some of the Irish regiments disbanded after WWI. He then went on to meet young scientists where he again spoke about the need to build British/Irish relations. Then is a separate report Tara O'Neill interviews Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness about his attendance at last night's state banquet in Windsor Castle. She asks him would his toast to the Queen be seen as the ultimate betrayal. He feels that he made the right decision and explains his point of view. He then comments on his attitude to the families of victims who protested outside and on dealing with the past and on last night's Spotlight programme. He talks about decommissioning and backs Sean Murray's comments on the story. Meanwhile, Unionists want a meeting with the PSNI to find out what they knew about the Spotlight allegations, with reaction from the DUP's Arlene Foster and then Mike Nesbitt of the UUP. Former Chief Constable Hugh Order, giving evidence to the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee at Westminster rejects allegations made last week by former Superintendent Norman Baxter that pressure was put on him from Number 10 to release Gerry McGeough, who was being questioned about the 1981 attempted murder of a UDR soldier. Film report of Hugh Orde's views on this and his views on the OTR letter given to John Downey. He rejected the view that he knew about the OTR letters, or that he was playing clever games around the peace process. Also giving evidence was former NIO minister Sean Woodward. He also rejected any allegations from Norman Baxter about political interference in police interrogation of suspects. Also today NI's Coroner says that she wants to know if any OTR letters were issued to suspects in the murder of 10 Protestant workmen by the PIRA at Kingsmills in 1976. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8167



Date Broadcast:
Wed 9th Apr 2014
Duration:
8 mins 55 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then reports of day two of President Higgins' visit to the UK, where he met Prime Minister David Cameron at Downing Street. Film report begins with a banquet tonight at the London Guildhall, where the Lord Mayor hosted 700 guests, including Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness and the SDLP's Mark Durkan. Then coverage of the President's visit to Downing Street, where both men praised the peace process here, and the improvement in British/Irish relations. After that the President visited Katy Hall young workshop. Then in London Marc Mallett and Tracy Magee discuss Martin McGuinness' attendance last night at the state banquet with the Queen, and Martin McGuinness' comments on him toasting the Queen. He said he did it for all of the right reasons and to build on the peace process, He calls it an act of conflict resolution. He also comments on the victims' protests outside the banquet, and nationalism's view on him toasting the Queen. Also today Lord Tebbitt said that he hoped that dissident republicans would shoot McGuinness in the back. Tracy Magee gives Martin McGuinness and Gerry Adams' reactions to that statement. She then previews tomorrow's events in President Higgins' visit. (Wed 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10270
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8168



Date Broadcast:
Thu 10th Apr 2014
Duration:
18 mins 40 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Tomorrow Seamus Daly will be charged with 29 murders in relation to the 1998 RIRA bombing in Omagh. Film report from Siobhan O'Neill. Nobody has ever been convicted in a criminal court for the bombing but Seamus Daly was previously found liable in a civil action taken by the families of the Omagh victims. In Carrickfergus police say that trouble has broken out tonight in the Woodbourne Avenue area. During Irish President Michael D Higgins's continuing state visit to Britain footage is shown of a function at Windsor Castle, showing Martin McGuinness shaking hands with the Queen. A film report covers her meeting the DUP's Peter Robinson, Arlene Foster and Simon Hamilton. All political parties were represented for this anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement function. Then in the evening they all attended a concert in the Royal Albert Hall. The state visit ends tomorrow. Then analysis by Tracy Magee of today's events. She says that 7 Sinn Fein politicians met the Queen today, including John O'Dowd, Michelle O'Neill, Caral Ni Chuilin, Francie Molloy, Mairtin O'Muilleoir and Conor Murphy. She comments on the significance of this for Sinn Fein and the overall success of President Higgins' visit in improving British/Irish relations. In the courts the mother of Philip Strickland, shot dead in Comber in January 2012, says that she is disgusted at the sentences handed down to her son's killers. Ian Weir gets four years and Jason Weir gets nine and a half years. Film report with details of the murder and the judge's remarks. A further two will be sentenced tomorrow. A man arrested in west Belfast in connection with the murder of Jean McConville has been released pending a report to the Department of Public Prosecutions. It is almost 30 years since a UVF bomb exploded outside the Whyte family home in the Ormeau Road area of south Belfast, killing a mother of ten and a policeman in April 1984. A film report using news reports examines this bombing and a previous one on the family home where the UVF bomber was seriously injured using old TV news clips and an interview with Isadore Whyte who wants to know the truth about the UDR/UVF collusion in the murders. An investigation by the Historical Enquiries Team (HET) came to a dead end. Then in the studio Jude Whyte and Kenny Donaldson from Innocent Victims United discuss issues around truth and justice from totally different perspectives. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8169



Date Broadcast:
Thu 10th Apr 2014
Duration:
19 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers begins with an interview with Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers. He gets her opinion on the success of President Higgins' visit to the UK. She calls it a celebration of the improving relationship between Britain and Ireland in recent years, and the huge contribution of Irish men and women have made in Britain over the centuries. She comments on the broad challenges facing the two governments on which they work together. She wasn't hugely surprised by the decision by Martin McGuinness to attend the state banquet and welcomes this move by Sinn Fein. She comments on the victims' protests, and says she understands them but says that McGuinness' attendance was an act of reconciliation. On Norman Tebbitt's remarks that he hoped that dissident republicans shoot Martin McGuinness in the back she said that, whilst she appreciated that Norman Tebbitt had suffered at the hands of the IRA, there was no excuse for inciting murder. Theresa Villiers then comments on the poor working relationship between the parties at Stormont over the issues of flags, parading and the past. She says that the two governments are working with the parties on these issues, as well as the issues of welfare reform and the National Crime Agency. She says that the government can't just wade in, take back powers and re-write the devolution settlement and that they would only interfere in any areas that had cross-community support. She adds that for any agreement to work on flags, parading and the past to work it must come from within Northern Ireland. She feels that local parties are capable of reaching agreement. When asked about allegations made in Tuesday's Spotlight programme about Sinn Fein gun running during the Good Friday Agreement talks. She says that this should be investigated but that she has no comment to make at this time. She says that it is up to the previous government to take responsibility for its actions. She is pushed on this issue and on her criticism of the Labour government and the OTR scheme and she does say that some decisions of the previous Labour government raised concerns and should be investigated. In the run up to the May elections she says that she believes that the leaders' talks will continue on flags and parading, as well as the National Crime Agency. She sees stalemate on the NCA as a big problem. Next Mark Carruthers introduces a Stephen Walker film report on Martin McGuinness' decision to attend the state banquet at Windsor and his motivation for attending. He begins by talking about how McGuinness' attendance overshadowed President Higgins in some media. Is his visit part of the peace process or does it have a wider overall significance? In 2011 Sinn Fein snubbed the Queen's Irish visit. Commentator Ruth Dudley Edwards gives her views of this change of heart. Then the views of Irish Times journalist Mark Hennessey who feels that Sinn Fein called it wrong in 2011 and misjudged the views of the Irish public. Their 2014 visit to Windsor is aimed at achieving a political future in the republic. Then commentator Eamon Delaney's views on this aspect. He agrees Sinn Fein are focusing on the south, where they feel that they are on the verge of a major breakthrough, but McGuinness denies that it is about electoral politics. He says that it is about showing that Sinn Fein is serious about reconciliation and conflict resolution, which he says is the next big phase of the peace process. . Ruth Dudley Edwards thinks that Sinn Fein will take their seats in Westminster but Martin McGuinness says that this is not going to happen. Then in the studio commentators Newton Emerson and Cathy Gormley-Heenan give their views on McGuinness' attendance at the state banquet and the reasons behind it in their views, and they also comment on the London media coverage of President Higgins' visit. Norman Tebbitt's comments and Theresa Villiers interview are also discussed.
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8170



Date Broadcast:
Fri 11th Apr 2014
Duration:
12 mins 40 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Dissident republican Seamus Daly (43) is charged with 29 murders in the August 1998 Omagh bombing. Film report covers the history of the case, with old film clips and pictures of the dead shown. No one has ever been convicted in a criminal court of the bombing. Daly is also charged with an attempted bombing in Lisburn in April 1998. Film clip of Daly from a BBC Panorama programme shown from 14 years ago. PSNI Detective Inspector John Caldwell says that he believes that he can connect Daly to the bombing. Daly was arrested at Daisy Hill hospital in Newry as he visited his pregnant wife. Daly was refused bail. Then Michael Gallagher, a victim's father, comments. Then Chris Butler's analysis. In Derry a booby trap bomb fell off a vehicle and was defused. Film report with PSNI Chief Inspector John Burrows' reaction, then local eye-witness John McDermott's comments. Then SDLP MLA Colum Eastwood's comments. Then a report from Newtownabbey where a row has broken out over a decision by the council to provide £30,000 for a bonfire site. Film report with comments from Alliance Councillor Billy Webb, then Rathcoole community worker Phil Hamilton's views on pallets/tyres being collected. Then DUP councillor Robert Hill defends plans to spend £30,000 on levelling the bonfire site and building a feature wall. Then SDLP councillor Noreen McClelland comments. In courts Jimmy Seales (56) has been given 15 years for the killing of Philip Strickland near Comber two years ago. Film report reveals that Steven McCaughey got 10 years. Film clip of judge's comments, then the victim's mother Liz Dempster's reaction. In Craigavon two people are arrested after a gun is found. The PSNI have warned that the UDA plans trouble in Carrickfergus tonight. In south Belfast a house was attacked in a hate crime. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8171



Date Broadcast:
Tue 15th Apr 2014
Duration:
13 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The PSNI are blaming the UVF for being behind racially motivated attacks in Belfast. Film report reviews recent attacks with the facts and figures and the comments of PSNI Assistant Chief Constable Will Kerr, then Ismaila Sule, a microbiologist who lives in east Belfast, describes the attacks on his house. In north Belfast this morning racist leaflets were put through doors by the British Movement. Les Allamby from the Strategic Movement Partnership gives his views on the leaflets. Then in east Belfast community worker George Newell from the Lagan Village youth and Community Group explains their links with migrants in the area. Then Deborah Watters from a group call Alternatives explains their work in engaging with victims of such attacks and young people. Then in the studio Paul Clark interviews Polish community worker Kasia Garbal and local writer Tim Brannigan about the issues raised in the film report around racism in Northern Ireland and how they have been affected by it, and the links between racism and sectarianism, and what politicians should be doing about it, including condemning the attacks. In Fintona, Co Tyrone, police arrested two men after stopping a van at 2am. It led to a security alert in the area. Film report with Sinn Fein MLA Barry McElduff's reaction. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
539
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8172



Date Broadcast:
Wed 16th Apr 2014
Duration:
12 mins 26 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers has said that dealing with the past must focus more on paramilitaries and less on the actions of the state. Film report from Ken Reid on Theresa Villiers speech to church leaders in Belfast. She says that the government does not believe in amnesties and urged the political parties to get back around the table, but she said that the current focus on the past is not balanced. She also calls on the Executive to introduce the National Crime Agency and warns of the dangers if welfare reform is not introduced here. Ken Reid says that her speech will please unionists. In a second film Tracy Magee examines victims' responses to Theresa Villiers speech, beginning with Ballymurphy massacre relative Briege Voyle confronting Theresa Villiers just after she had made her speech. In an interview Breige Voyle says that she does not share Theresa Villiers view that too much attention is being paid to state killings. Over on the Shankill Charlie Butler, who lost 3 relatives in the 1993 IRA bombing says that Theresa Villiers is right. He feels that everyone is entitled to the truth and he feels that there is too much focus on the army. Politicians are also divided on Theresa Villiers comments, as shown by the reactions of the DUP's Nigel Dodds and Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly. Then political editor Ken Reid gives his analysis of Theresa Villiers speech and the reactions to it. He also mentions the news story that Victims Commissioner Kathryn Stone is resigning and moving to a different job in England. Over recent weeks the PSNI has said that young people are using social media to arrange fights at an east Belfast interface. Film report with PSNU Inspector Darren Jones discussing what he labels 'recreational violence' and he warns young people that they will be arrested. In the courts Seamus Daly (43), who is accused of the 1998 Real IRA bombing in Omagh that killed 29 people, is refused bail. Film report details the evidence against him. Police have arrested a 58 year old man as part of their enquiries into the March 2012 murder of pizza delivery driver Kieran McManus in west Belfast. Film report. A woman (57) arrested over the 1972 murder of Jean McConville has been released. Film report. (Wed 6pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8173



Date Broadcast:
Wed 16th Apr 2014
Duration:
10 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines then coverage of Secretary of State Theresa Villiers comments that in dealing with the past too much attention is focused on the actions of the state. Film report with Theresa Villiers interview. Then outside she is confronted by Briege Voyle of the Ballymurphy families, Then the views of the DUP's Nigel Dodds, UUP's Mike Nesbitt and Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly. Then a report from Donna Trainor at Belfast City Hall where the group Relatives for Justice are displaying their remembering quilts. The report also includes an interview with Kathryn Stone, the Victims' Commissioner, who has advised that she is resigning. In City Hall Mark Thompson of Relatives for Justice and WAVE Trauma's Alan McBride comment on Kathryn Stone's achievements. Both then comment on Theresa Villiers' views on dealing with the past. Next court news on Seamus Daly (43) being refused bail in relation to the 1998 Omagh bomb which killed 29 people. Film report. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8174



Date Broadcast:
Fri 18th Apr 2014
Duration:
3 mins 6 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Dissident republicans have shot dead Tom Crossan (43) on Belfast's Springfield Road. Film report. Stormont MLA David McClafferty (63) has died of cancer. The independent MLA had previously been a member of the UUP. Film report on his career with comments from Reg Empey, then the SDLP's John Dallat, Alliance's Naomi Long and a statement from Peter Robinson and Martin McGuinness. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8175



Date Broadcast:
Sat 19th Apr 2014
Duration:
2 mins 47 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Fears are growing that the murder of former senior dissident republican Tommy Crossan could be part of a dissident republican feud. Film report on yesterday's murder of the father of six. PSNI Detective Superintendent Johnathan Roberts' comments, then Sinn Fein's Jennifer McCann's views. In Banbridge there is an arson attack on a car. (Sat 5pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8176



Date Broadcast:
Sat 19th Apr 2014
Duration:
2 mins 7 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of the murder of dissident republican Tommy Crossan in west Belfast with comments from PSNI Detective Superintendent Jonathan Roberts on possible motives. Tommy Crossan was a former member of the Continuity IRA. (Sat 5.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8177



Date Broadcast:
Sun 20th Apr 2014
Duration:
? mins ? secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
A woman's body has been found in Lenadoon in west Belfast. Film report of the arrest of a 36 year old man. Martina Anderson MEP addressed the main republican parade in west Belfast's Milltown Cemetery. She condemns the killers of former CIRA member Tommy Crossan. Film report on Easter parades in Belfast, Derry & Dublin. (Easter Sunday, 5pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8178



Date Broadcast:
Mon 21st Apr 2014
Duration:
4 mins 4 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Apprentice Boys Parade past St Patrick's Catholic Church passes off peacefully and bands played a single drumbeat only. Film report with comments from Frank Dempsey of Carrick Hill residents and Chris McGimpsey of the Apprentice Boys. In Derry around 100 people attended a dissident republican parade and rally. Film report. PIRA informer Denis Donaldson's family have threatened to sue the Gardai over his missing journal which could contain clues to his death. Film report. A man arrested over the murder of Tommy Crossan has been released. Film report. (Mon 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8179



Date Broadcast:
Tue 22nd Apr 2014
Duration:
6 mins 11 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then the funeral of Independent MLA David McClafferty. Film report. The Apprentice Boys' have been praised by both the SDLP and Sinn Fein for their behaviour during their parade past St Patrick's Church. Film report with political reactions. Brief news stories. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8180



Date Broadcast:
Wed 23rd Apr 2014
Duration:
6 mins 32 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Ex-PIRA man Peter Rodgers, an escapee from the Maidstone prison ship and who in 1980 was convicted of killing Garda Seamus Quade says that Martin McGuinness and Gerry Adams ordered him to take explosives to England in 1980. Film report with P Rodgers interview, denials from Adams and McGuinness and a profile of Garda Quade's murder. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10280
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8181



Date Broadcast:
Thu 24th Apr 2014
Duration:
3 mins 44 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In south and west Belfast police are investigating hate crime attacks against a Polish and a Traveller family. File report with east Belfast Alliance MP Naomi Long's reaction. Earlier this week the police accused the UVF of orchestrating the attacks, which have saw a 70% increase in Belfast. In west Belfast the funeral took place of Tommy Crossan (43) who was shot dead on the Springfield Road in Good Friday. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8182



Date Broadcast:
Fri 25th Apr 2014
Duration:
2 mins 16 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Loyalists held a parade in Larne in period costume to commemorate the 1914 Clyde Valley gun-running by the UVF. Film report with comments from organiser Billy Adamson, then a vox pop of people at the parade. (Sat 7pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8183



Date Broadcast:
Mon 28th Apr 2014
Duration:
13 mins 2 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
High Court Judge Treacey has ruled that the PSNI wrongly facilitated illegal loyalist flag protest parades in December 2012 and January 2013. Chief Constable Matt Baggott says that he will appeal the decision. Film report with Matt Baggott interview. The On the Runs (OTR) controversy is refusing to go away as UDR soldier Lexi Cummins' (killed by the PIRA in 1982) family has been told that the PSNI is re-examining the case. Film report with Sharon O'Neill interviewing the victim's niece Shelley Gilfennan after the meeting with the PSNI. Then the DUP's Jonathan Craig comments. Old film clip shown of the shooting scene. Shirley Gilfennan believes that one of the shooters got an OTR comfort letter. Sharon O'Neill outlines previous investigations into Lexi Cummins killing. The 2003 HET inquiry said that a suspect, who is now a Sinn Fein councillor in the Republic, was on a list of OTRs given to the British government by Sinn Fein, and the Department of Public Prosecutions rescinded its 1982 decision to prosecute the republican. Shelley Gilfennan believes that she will get justice. In the next report Judith Hill follows the growing speculation that Pope Francis will visit North and Southern Ireland next year. Film report as Enda Kenny visits Rome, and footage is shown of Pope John Paul II's cancelled visit to Northern Ireland. Then in the studio Michael Kelly of the Irish Catholic paper and commentator Jude Collins discuss the likelihood of a Papal visit. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8184



Date Broadcast:
Mon 28th Apr 2014
Duration:
8 mins 29 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Stormont Today
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers covers Question Time in Stormont today, where Peter Robinson (DUP) answered questions from independent Unionist MLA David McNarry on welfare reform stalemate, the TUV's Jim Allister questions the Executive's credibility after claims this week from former PIRA member Peter Rogers that Sinn Fein's Martin McGuiness and Gerry Adams ordered him to take explosives to England in 1980. Jim Allister calls Martin McGuinness a 'Director of Terrorism'. Peter Robinson says that it is no secret within the house of Martin McGuinness' involvement with the PIRA and he adds that if there is any evidence he was involved in criminal activities he should be tried in a court. Then the UUP's Danny Kinahan asks for an update into the judge-led inquiry into the OTR scheme. Robinson said that he has met Judge Hallett and that she is interviewing people and reading documents. He feels that her inquiry will help other inquiries into the OTRs. Then commentator Alex Kane gives his views on Peter Robinson's comments regarding allegations against Martin McGuinness and unionists' views of McGuinness and Sinn Fein in government here.
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8185



Date Broadcast:
Tue 29th Apr 2014
Duration:
7 mins 15 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then Secretary of State Theresa Villiers has, by letter, informed the families of the victims of the Ballymurphy massacre (August 1971) and the La Mon Hotel bombing (1978) that the will not be receiving independent investigations into the events. Film report from Conor MacAuley shows the angry reaction from Briege Voyle of the Ballymurphy families. Old film clips shown, then contents of Theresa Villiers letter shown, then Rita Banner of the Ballymurphy families' reaction. Then a film clip is shown of the La Mon bombing is shown, with Andrew Nelson's reaction. Then UUP MLA Michael Copeland's reaction. Next report covers further PSNI reaction to the court ruling that was critical of the police handling of loyalist flag protest parades in December 2012 and January 2013. PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott has vowed to appeal the decision. His comments from that time are shown, then his comments today, followed by reaction from Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly and the DUP's Paul Givan. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8186



Date Broadcast:
Tue 29th Apr 2014
Duration:
4 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers' letter to the families of the Ballymurphy massacre and the La Mon bombing that they wouldn't be getting an independent investigation into the events. Film report with Briege Voyle's comments at a press conference, then John Teggart, whose father Daniel was killed by the Paras, gives his reaction. Then UUP MLA Michael Copeland gives the reaction of the La Mon families. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8187



Date Broadcast:
Wed 30th Apr 2014
Duration:
20 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC2
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Who murdered Maxine?
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
[First 5 minutes missing] This programme follows the campaign of the families of the Birmingham pub bombings (1974) as they try to discover the truth about who was responsible for the bombings 40 years ago that killed 21 people. The programme mainly focuses on the efforts of the Hambletons, whose sister Maxine was killed in the bombings. It begins with Julie and Brian Hambleton travelling to Belfast to meet the DUP's Peter Robinson. It is their first visit to Northern Ireland. They comment on their expectations. Then, in Belfast, Peter Robinson says that if they give him a dossier he will ensure that it gets into the hands of British Prime Minister David Cameron. He believes that the family should get a new investigation. Julie says that she is pleased with how the meeting went. Back in Birmingham their campaign continues. It has taken over their lives and their living room. Julie explains why they left it so long before starting their campaign. She says that she wasn't strong enough in the 1970s. She comments on the family's grief, then a film clip shows Paddy Hill, one of the Birmingham 6, addressing the media outside the High Court after their release after serving 16 years for something they did not do. Julie says that the original convictions were another reason why they kept their heads down in the early years. The programme then profiles the Birmingham 6, and Julie recalls her reaction to their release. She says that she felt like Maxine had been murdered all over again. Then the programme talks to Paddy Hill, free from prison now for 23 years and who carries the scars from his own battle for justice. Like the families he too wants the truth, but asks would the families want his help? On their way to meet Paddy Hill Brian says that it was like going to meet the enemy as for 16 years they had hated him. Paddy Hill says that he too is apprehensive about the meeting. Both sides comment on their feelings. They meet in the Warrington Peace Centre. Things are tense as they enter the room. The conversation starts when Paddy Hill says that the British knew that they had the wrong people for the bombings but didn't care. After about two hours some common ground opens up as Paddy Hill agrees to make all of his legal documents available to the families. Paddy Hill breaks down as he talks about the damage done to his family with his conviction. The meeting ended hopefully and both sides give their views on how it went. After a second police investigation in 1994 there was still no breakthrough. Film clip shown of press conference. Julie doubts their efforts. Then the West Midlands Assistant Chief Constable Marcus Beale explains what the police are currently doing in this case. They are reviewing a massive amount of paperwork. Film clip shown. ACC Beale says that they will go wherever the evidence takes them and he comments on the flawed evidence of his predecessors that was overturned in the Court of Appeal and on the police's relationship with the families now. Paddy Hill has invited the Hambletons to his solicitor's office in London. Julie comments, then Gareth Pierce meets the Hambletons. She has over 200 boxes of papers. Both comment on this odd alliance, saying that they are fighting for the same cause and looking for the same answers, but should they really be doing their own detective work? Gareth Pierce comments on police failures, and the fact that they haven't even owned up to theses failures. Then Paddy Hill offers his advice on what the families should do now. Julie comments again on meeting Paddy Hill, then Brian says that he feels that the campaign is moving forward.
DVD No.
D10260
Tape No.
538
Country of Origin:
Record No.
6661



Date Broadcast:
Wed 30th Apr 2014
Duration:
6 mins 56 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Naomi Long's Alliance Party office in east Belfast has been petrol bombed again. Film report with Naomi Long's comments and a history of previous attacks, with comments of PSNI Chief Inspector Darren Jones. Then a vox pop of local people. At Westminster the Northern Ireland Affairs Committee today interviewed Kevin McGinty, a senior lawyer in the Attorney General's office, about the legal standing of the OTR letters. He says that the letters could be withdrawn, but that the person who had received the letter would have to be informed that they were being withdrawn so they could make arrangements to leave Northern Ireland without being arrested. If this did not happen then the government would be in the same situation as with what happened in the case of John Downey. He also said that successive Attorney Generals opposed the scheme. Earlier, former RUC Chief Constable Ronnie Flanagan had said that he had no problem telling people that they weren't wanted if there were no grounds to arrest the person. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8188



Date Broadcast:
Thu 1st May 2014
Duration:
14 mins 21 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams is still being held by the PSNI. Latest from Antrim Custody Centre, where he is being questioned about the 1972 murder of Jean McConville. Tara Mills reports, saying that he is the first leader of a mainstream political party to be questioned about murder. Adams went to Antrim voluntarily. Film report shows reaction from around the world, then an RTE clip shows Adams saying that he is going to Antrim voluntarily as there is a malicious campaign against him. He declares his innocence, the Martin McGuinness complains the timing of the arrest in the mouth of an election, but Peter Robinson says that the PSNI cannot let an election deflect them from their duty. Ivor Bell was charged in March over the murder on the basis of an interview he gave to Boston College. Brendan Hughes, who is dead now, also gave an interview in which he implicated Adams in the murder. Recording played, then Adams' denials from last year. Adams can be questioned for 48 hours then the PSNI must apply for an extension from the courts. In the next report Conor MacAuley interviews Michael McConville, son of Jean McConville, on his family's reaction to Adams' arrest, with an old film clip from 1972 shown. He recalls his mother's abduction and murder. He has never given a statement to the police as he is fearful that the IRA would kill one of his family in revenge. He still sees the abductors on the streets. He thinks that they should be tried for war crimes at the European Court at The Hague. Next report from Martina Purdy gives her analysis of Gerry Adams language over recent years and today on RTE on his attitude to the IRA and whether he was ever a member of the IRA. It looks back to 1972 when internee Adams was released to attend secret IRA talks with the British government in London. Former Press Association Editor Derek Henderson comments. Film and photos of Adams in a beret are shown. Film clip of Adams 'they haven't gone away you know' is shown. Then a clip of an interview with RTE is shown where Adams says that he will never disassociate himself from the IRA. British Prime Minister David Cameron denies that there was any political interference in Adams arrest. Then Mark Devenport gives the reaction in Dublin, the effect on Sinn Fein/PSNI relations, the impact on the election and the issue of dealing with the past. (Thurs 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8189



Date Broadcast:
Thu 1st May 2014
Duration:
25 mins 9 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Gerry Adams will spend a second night in police custody in Antrim. His arrest has caused a political storm. First a report from the serious crime suite in Antrim from Sarah Moore, where the world's media is present. Adams denies any involvement in the abduction and murder of Jean McConville. He can be held for up to 48 hours before the court has to grant an extension. Then in the studio journalist Sharon O'Neill summarises the decades of allegations against Adams on this issue. Her film report begins with the 2008 funeral of IRA member Brendan Hughes. Adams carried his coffin. They had been friends in the Maze, photo shown, but that ended when Adams went into government at Stormont with Paisley. In his Boston College interviews Hughes accuses Adams of involvement in Jean McConville's murder. Adams continually denies that he was in the IRA, 2010 comments shown and again last night on RTE there are more denials. Then film clip shown of IRA funeral in 1970. Adams is shown wearing a black beret. Then Michael McConville recalls his mother's abduction in 1972. He said that he knows who took his mother away but that he has never named them publically as he was afraid that the IRA would murder a member of his family as informers. Then in last night's interview Gerry Adams again denies any involvement in Jean McConville. Then Michael McConville says that he wants justice. Then Sharon O'Neill's analysis of the McConville family's reaction. Then in the studio Paul Clark talks to a panel including Noel Doran (Irish News) and independent journalists Eamon Maillie and Brian Rowan. They all comment on the 'was he or wasn't he in the IRA' story that has been going on for decades. They discuss the role of the Boston College tapes in the police case and the implications of Adams arrest on local politics, and what happens next. Then political editor Ken Reid presents a film report on the fallout of Adams arrest, with Martin McGuinness blaming the 'dark side of the PSNI' for the arrest. In his reaction Peter Robinson rules out any suggestion of political policing in this issue. Then Irish Taoiseach Enda Kenny and British Prime Minister David Cameron's views, followed by PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott's views at yesterday's Policing Board meeting. Then the SDLP's Dolores Kelly, UUP's Mike Nesbitt and Alliance's Chris Lyttle. With 3 weeks to an election the Adams arrest has raised political temperatures says Ken Reid. Then Paul Clark talks to the Sunday Times Irish correspondent John Mooney on the reaction to Adams arrest among politicians in Dublin, where most aren't commenting other than to say that they support the McConville family. He feels that the Irish public are shocked at Sinn Fein's claims of political interference. He also comments on the possible damage to Sinn Fein's electoral chances in the Republic's coming election. Then news that Martin McGuinness has telephoned David Cameron over the issue, Then Eamon Maillie says that he does not think that the arrest will not affect Sinn Fein's vote. Some tweets sent in by the public regarding political interference are shown and the panel comment on those. In other news a 47 year old man has been arrested after a PSNI search of Maeve House flats complex found explosives. Film report from Poleglass where a pipe bomb has been found. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8190



Date Broadcast:
Thu 1st May 2014
Duration:
34 mins 16 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers begins with the coverage of the arrest of Gerry Adams for questioning regarding the abduction and murder in 1972 of Jean McConville and the police reaction to the arrest, with Sinn Fein's Mary Lou McDonald blaming 'old guard' elements within the PSNI, then the DUP's Peter Robinson says that no-one is above the law. Martin McGuinness says that it is an attempt to influence the upcoming election in 3 weeks' time. Then in the studio is Mark Devenport, who wrote a biography of Gerry Adams in 1997, and from Dublin Irish Times political editor Stephen Collins discuss the impact of the arrest north and south, and the timing of the arrest, and also tonight's telephone call between Martin McGuinness and David Cameron. Mark Devenport gives the security forces view on Adams continued denial that he was ever in the IRA. Stephen Collins says that the arrest was a big surprise in the south and gives the Fianna Fail & fine Gael reaction. He speculates as to whether it will affect Sinn Fein's vote in the upcoming European election. He says that it will give their opponents a lot of ammunition, whereas Mark Devenport says that he does not think that it will affect their vote in the north. Next political correspondent Gareth Gordon is sent to Scotland to examine Scotland's upcoming independence referendum and the mood of the people there, starting with Captain Val Plant, Skipper of the P&O Express Ferry's views on the possible effects. He feels that most of the questions have not being answered yet. Then Robert Erskine comments on his fears over Scotland's defence. Bookie Jim Fox gives the current odds, with a no vote currently being favourite. Then a vox pop of people at Ayr race course includes Rodney Wallace, who wants more facts. Then SNP councillor Alec Oates and SNP councillor Jim McClung's views. Back in the studio Mark Carruthers reminds us of the upcoming local and European elections in 3 weeks. In the studio he interviews Euro election candidates Anna Lo from the Alliance Party and the TUV's Jim Allister. He begins by asking them why people should vote for them. Jim Allister wants a Euro referendum and for Britain vote leave. Anna Lo doesn't want a referendum and wants Britain to stay in the EU. They both argue about the finances involved in both leaving or staying in Europe and the possible effects on farmers here. Mark Carruthers then challenges both candidates on their chances of getting elected to Europe, and quotes both parties previous electoral performances. They both deny that they are fighting for 5th place and Jim Allister denies that he is splitting the unionist vote. Anna Lo comments on her remarks a few weeks ago about favouring a long term, agreed united Ireland. She denies Jim Allister's claim that she has joined the 'pan-nationalist front'. Both comment on the arrest of Gerry Adams, then Professors Rick Wilford and Deirdre Heenan give their views on the arrest of Gerry Adams and allegations of political interference in policing, and the possible effects on Sinn Fein's vote both north and south.
DVD No.
D10290
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8191



Date Broadcast:
Fri 2nd May 2014
Duration:
10 mins 17 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The PSNI have applied to a judge for more time to question SF President Gerry Adams about the 1972 abduction and murder of Jean McConville. Film report from Antrim Serious Crime Suite. The reporter says that the High Court hearing is still going on. She also says that former PIRA member Peter Rogers claims that he was approached by the PSNI to give a statement saying that he was ordered by Adams to transport explosives to England in 1980. He refused to give the statement. Next Martina Purdy examines today's political reaction from Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness, who says that a cabal within the PSNI have a negative and destructive approach to the peace process and Sinn Fein. He also hinted that Sinn Fein's current attitude towards policing could be affected if the situation was not resolved satisfactorily. Earlier the Secretary of State Theresa Villiers explained why Prime Minister David Cameron had phoned Martin McGuinness and the seriousness of the situation. Theresa Villiers knew on Monday that Adams would be arrested. In a written response to Labour's Kate Hoey Theresa Villiers revealed that there were 365 royal pardons issued between 1979 and 2002. No records were found between 1987 and 1997, and there was no information as to whether any paramilitaries received a royal pardon. The next report looks at the role of the so-called 'Boston Tapes' in the arrest of Gerry Adams, beginning with a review of the US court battles to have the tapes handed over to the PSNI. Next, reporter Mark Simpson travels to Dundalk, where the sitting TD is Gerry Adams, to gauge the reaction of locals to his arrest. Film report with vox pop and views of local newspaper editor John Mulligan. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8192



Date Broadcast:
Fri 2nd May 2014
Duration:
5 mins 44 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The PSNI have been granted another 48 hours to question Gerry Adams. Film report from Sharon O'Neill at Antrim Police Station, where Sinn Fein's Gerry Kelly spoke of the anger within the nationalist/republican community at what he calls political policing. A further report covers Martin McGuinness' comments regarding Sinn Fein's continued support for policing if the Gerry Adams arrest continues. He also attacks 'negative, anti-peace process and anti-Sinn Fein elements' within the security forces. Then the DUP's Peter Robinson says that he supports the police and Alliance Justice Minister David Ford denies the allegations of political policing. Meanwhile, Helen McKendry, the daughter of Jean McConville, says that she has already given the police the names of the people that she believes killed her mother. Film clip of interview with Helen McKendry where she says that she wants justice. (Fri 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8193



Date Broadcast:
Sat 3rd May 2014
Duration:
4 mins 29 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Sinn Fein held a rally today on the Falls Road in support of their leader, Gerry Adams. Film report with Martin McGuinness' criticism of political policing in his address to the crowd. Later Alliance Justice Minister David Ford denies that the arrest of Adams was political. Back at the Sinn Fein rally senior republican Bobby Storey said that the message to the PSNI was 'we ain't going away you know'. After the rally Martin McGuinness said that Sinn Fein still supports the peace process. In the courts Tom Hughes has been charged with possessing 2.5 kilos of Semtex in Maeve House in the New Lodge Road area. (Sat 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8194



Date Broadcast:
Sun 4th May 2014
Duration:
34 mins 10 secs
Broadcast Company:
Sky Group
Channel:
Sky
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
Sky News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Gerry Adams has been released without charge and has called a press conference at a Belfast hotel. Sky News gives live coverage, beginning with the press photographing Adams as he arrives with senior party colleagues. Mary Lou McDonald chairs the press conference. With her is Martin McGuinness, Gerry Kelly, Caral Ni Chuilin and other senior party members. Gerry Adams then makes a speech. Beginning in Irish, he says that he voluntarily went to meet the PSNI from the Dail following what he termed a 'vicious, spiteful campaign' against him in the media. When the PSNI contacted his solicitor on Monday he says that he was concerned about the timing, bearing in mind that the European and local government elections are only 3 weeks away. He is conscious of the other family at the heart of all this, the McConville family. He says that he is innocent of any involvement in the abduction and killing of Jean McConville and he has worked hard to have this injustice redressed and have the body of Jean McConville returned, and will continue to help to recover the bodies of the other disappeared. Sitting in his cell he says that he reflected that tomorrow is the anniversary of Bobby Sands death, but this is not 1981 or 1972. The people of Ireland have carved out a new dispensation, and whilst the past, and victims, need to be dealt with there can be no going back. Peace needs to be built, with a consistent focus, and he says that this is his, and Sinn Fein's, commitment. He doesn't want to be treated differently to anyone else. He is an activist and he understands that he will have opponents, and he understands that there are sinister elements who are against the changes that Sinn Fein are committed to achieving. He says that those who authorised his arrest could have done it differently, but that they used coercive legislation to deal with a legacy issue. They did not need to do it in the middle of an election campaign as he says that he contacted them two months ago. He says that he supports the PSNI and wants to build a civic police service, but that there is an 'old guard' that does not want change. He wants a peaceful Ireland, built on equality. He adds that he has never disassociated himself from the IRA and never will, but he is glad that he and others have created a peaceful democratic way forward. The IRA is gone, it's finished. He says that his interrogators focused on the 1960s & 1970s and the times he was arrested. Photos, newspaper articles and books were produced as the basis of the accusations against him. He also mentions the Boston College tapes, and says that Ed Moloney and Anthony McIntyre are opponents of the Sinn Fein leadership and its peace strategy, They interviewed enemies of the Good Friday Agreement and the peace process and the PSNI used hearsay evidence in their case against him, mostly form Brendan Hughes and Dolores Price. Some of the allegations against him come from people named simply as 'A' or 'B'. He rejects all of the allegations against him in the Boston interviews. He says that society needs to move forward, and that Sinn Fein will help in dealing with the past, but that there are elements who want to stop that. He offers his sympathies to the McConville family and the families of other victims of IRA violence. He talks about the future vision for Sinn Fein. Adams sits down to applause. Then T Gorman asks him what he thinks of Michael McConville holding his own press conference, and did he think he would be charged? Adams says that there was no basis for charges against him. He says that the McConville family suffered a gross injustice, but that we are in a better place now. He is asked again about the timing of his arrest and again he re-iterates his views on that. He is asked how he feels about how this will affect his relationship with Peter Robinson and the DUP. He says that there is only one way forward. He comments on the holding centre food being inedible and says that he did make a complaint. Adams says that they were looking to lay an IRA membership charge alongside the McConville one. He said they did 33 taped interviews with him but offered no evidence other than the Boston College tapes. Adams then comments on the routine used to renew his detention before a judge, and the role of a Superintendent in this process. He says that this process isn't up to 2014 standards. He is then asked about his fear of being re-arrested and what message his arrest sends out. He re-affirms Sinn Fein's support for the peace process. The last questioner asks if he would be calling for an amnesty. Adams said that Sinn Fein has never called for an amnesty. He then attacks the Boston tapes again as a source of evidence. A question in Irish ends the report. (Sun 8pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
540
Country of Origin:
England
Record No.
8195



Date Broadcast:
Sun 4th May 2014
Duration:
8 mins 10 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
RTE News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of the release of Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams after 4 days in police custody. Film report from Tommy Gorman at the hotel in Belfast where Gerry Adams gave his press conference after being released. It shows a film clip of loyalists at Antrim police station trying block Adams release. Adams had to leave via the back door. He was released without charge. A file will be sent to the Public Prosecution Service (PPS). Once in Belfast Adams gave a press conference in which he said that there was no basis for charges against him. He says that the murder of Jean McConville was an injustice. Tommy Gorman then gives the political reaction to Adams' release. The DUP's Jeffrey Donaldson rejects Sinn Fein's assertion that there is a 'cabal' within the PSNI and criticises their threat to withdraw support from policing. On the radio Michael McConville had said that an outside police force may be needed to examine this case. Then Martin Mansergh, a former adviser to a number of Irish Prime Ministers, called Adams arrest a 'sophisticated sting operation'. Then Eamon Gilmore and the Minister for Foreign Affairs give their views on the peace process. Tommy Gorman gives his views on what happens next.
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
8196



Date Broadcast:
Sun 4th May 2014
Duration:
25 mins 3 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BCC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of the release of Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams' without charge. File to be sent to the Public Prosecution Service (PPS). He was held for 4 days regarding the 1972 murder of Jean McConville. Film report on loyalist protest at Antrim police station as Adams is released. Afterwards Adams held a press conference in Belfast in which he said that he is innocent of any involvement in the abduction and murder of Jena McConville in 1972. He says that the past needs to be dealt with, and that Sinn Fein are up for doing that and that there can be no going back. He goes on to say that these are changed times, including for the police. He criticises the PSNI for using coercive legislation on him, and for arresting him during an election campaign. He adds that he will work to create a genuine civic police force, and says that the dark side of the British system cannot be used to deny anyone a rights-based, citizen centred society. He says that he has never disassociated himself from the IRA and says that he never will, but that he wants to help build a peaceful, democratic way forward for everyone. The IRA is gone, finished he says. Sinn Fein's leadership wants to build the peace. In the studio Vincent Kearney gives his analysis of Gerry Adams comments on his detention and the 33 taped interviews that went back to his 1960s civil rights days. He was questioned about old photos, books written about him, his attendance at IRA funerals and accusations made about him in the Boston College tapes. Vincent Kearney explains what happens next with a file being sent to the PPS and what that means in this case about the possibility of charges in the future. He says that this is unlikely. He also comments on the effects on Sinn Fein/PSNI relations. He believes that the arrest was a high risk gamble for the PSNI and has been an embarrassment for them. He comments also on Sinn Fein's allegations of a 'cabal' operating within the PSNI and working against Sinn Fein. In the next report Julian Fowler interviews Michael McConville, Jean's son, about what the family hopes will happen now. He criticises politicians for getting involved in policing. They want justice and says that the murderers should be tried in the International Criminal Court in The Hague for war crimes. He also says that he knows the identity of the killers and that he doesn't trust any assurances from Sinn Fein. In the studio Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey and the DUP's Nigel Dodds discuss issues around Adams arrest, with Dodds saying that the rule of law must apply to everyone and that his sympathies are with the McConville family. He accuses Sinn Fein of being self-pitying, then Alex Maskey stands over Sinn Fein's accusations against the PSNI. He rejects the idea that Sinn Fein were interfering with policing. He says that their criticisms were legitimate. Nigel Dodds continues his attack on Sinn Fein, saying that they are showing a lack of political leadership and are isolated on this issue. Alex Maskey emphasises politicians' collective responsibility to all of the people, and denies that they are isolated. Then Tara O'Neill returns to Gerry Adams' press conference where he answers a question on Peter Robinson's accusation that Sinn Fein were using 'bully-boy' tactics against the PSNI. He says that Sinn Fein is committed to the peace process. Mark Devenport says that the fact that Adams has not been charged will be a boost to Sinn Fein in the elections north and south and he praises Adams' sure-footed press conference performance. He then gives his views on Sinn Fein's relationship with both the DUP and the PSNI, and he says that the whole affair is a wake-up call to the two governments. After a brief mention of more racist attacks on Polish families in east Belfast Tara Mills interviews Irish News Editor Noel Doran and the commentator Alex Kane on their views about Adams' arrest, the election, politics here and the need to find a way of dealing with the past. (Sun 10.15)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8197



Date Broadcast:
Mon 5th May 2014
Duration:
5 mins 12 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Helen McKendry, a daughter of Jean McConville, says that she is hopeful that the family will be able to raise enough money to take a civil case against Gerry Adams over her mother's death. She says she couldn't bear to watch Gerry Adams press conference. Then the views of the Alliance Party's David Ford and the DUP's Nigel Dodds on the police's actions and sympathy for the McConville family. Then further political reaction from Naomi Long (Alliance), Alasdair McDonnell (SDLP) and Mike Nesbitt (UUP). Next report on latest attacks on Polish families in east Belfast. (Bank Holiday Monday, 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8198



Date Broadcast:
Tue 6th May 2014
Duration:
10 mins 36 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott rejects Sinn Fein's allegations of a 'dark side' within the PSNI being behind the arrest of Gerry Adams. Film report from Vincent Kearney reviews the arrest and Gerry Adams comments. Then Martin McGuinness' comments on the dark side. Matt Baggott's statement read out. Also today the DUP Peter Robinson says that they would have tried exclude Sinn Fein from Stormont if they had've withdrawn support for policing. Next report focuses on the Boston College tapes project. The tapes are held in Boston's Burns Library. The interview by former IRA member Brendan Hughes, who is dead, is highlighted. Then Boston's Jack Dunn says that those who gave interviews must have known that the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty of 1994 meant that those tapes could have been handed over to the police but chief interviewer Anthony McIntyre says that he would not have conducted the interviews if he thought that there was that risk. Boston College said that it was willing to hand the tapes back to interviewees (see Spotlight on D10310 for more on the Boston Tapes story). In the courts 12 men on charges of manslaughter relating to the loyalist mob killing of Catholic Kevin McDaid 5 years ago and wounding his friend Damien Fleming pleaded guilty to lesser charges. Film report says that a further 5 men will face a full trial. Last night in east Belfast another Polish family home was attacked. Film report covers PSNI meeting at City Hall with community representatives about the spate of hate crimes with honorary Polish Consulate Jerome Mullan's comments, then Maurice Kincaid from the East Belfast Partnership. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8199



Date Broadcast:
Tue 6th May 2014
Duration:
9 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Political reaction to the Adams arrest continues as the DUP's Peter Robinson tries to find out if Martin McGuinness had broken the Ministerial Code in his remarks about policing. It begins with film clips of Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams at an election rally last night, then his comments about Sinn Fein still supporting policing and Martin McGuinness' 'dark side' remarks last week and Chief Constable Matt Baggott's rejection of that today. Then Peter Robinson's exclusion remarks with Sinn Fein's Conor Murphy's comments. Meanwhile Boston College says that it is willing to return 44 taped interviews with paramilitaries. Researcher Anthony McIntyre says that the project is now ruined by Boston College's refusal to fight handing over the tapes to the PSNI. He gives details of the content of the interviews. He welcomes Boston College handing back the tapes but he would have wanted them given to his protection 3 years ago. He comments on the arrest of Gerry Adams based on the tapes contents. He also comments on the view that he has a grudge against Adams. He says that society needs an amnesty for troubles crimes to move forward. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10300
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8200



Date Broadcast:
Tue 6th May 2014
Duration:
28 mins 39 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
Not Going Away
Description:
In this documentary Declan Lawn looks at the recent arrest of Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams by the PSNI and his detention for 4 days, and the role of the Boston project, known as the Boston Tapes, in bringing that about. He asks what is the future now for the Boston College project? The programme begins with news coverage of Gerry Adams arrest from across the world. The story went global. Then mention of the Boston project and researcher Anthony McIntyre's comments on his regrets about the project. This academic history project shattered the IRA's code of silence says Declan Lawn. As the world waited to see if Adams would be charged Anthony McIntyre was at the eye of the storm once the interviews that he conducted with former republican and loyalists were handed to the PSNI by the American courts. Anthony McIntyre says that he was horrified at Adams arrest and feels bad about it. In the year 2000 McIntyre and journalist Ed Moloney met with representatives of Boston College to discuss an oral history project where they would interview former combatants in the troubles. Anthony McIntyre was a former IRA member and he says that he and Ed Moloney told Boston College that there would have to be an absolute guarantee that the British would not be given access to the interviews. One year later Anthony McIntyre began the interviews believing that Boston College had taken legal advice and that those guarantees were in place. Ed Moloney believes that e-mails that he received from Boston College confirmed this, but US journalist Niall Stanage says that the court precedent shows that this was not possible in the US. Then Jack Dunn, a spokesman for Boston College, says that no guarantees were given, but both McIntyre and Moloney deny this. The consent forms that the interviewees signed mentioned protection and the interviews were only to be made public after their deaths. 26 republicans, 14 UVF members and 1 law enforcement official signed the forms. McIntyre won't reveal the names of those that he interviewed but he admitted that he himself was one of them. He says that he didn't lead people into doing anything that he wasn't prepared to do himself and he only did so because he believed that the legal protections were in place from Boston College. One of the events discussed was the 1972 IRA murder of Jean McConville. Commentator Chris Donnelly comments on how this murder haunts republicans. He says that it was shameful. Anthony McIntyre calls it a war crime. Film of 2003 discovery of Jean McConville's body. . One interview was with veteran republican Brendan Hughes, who says that Gerry Adams ordered the killing. An audio clip of Brendan Hughes interview is played of Brendan Hughes stating this. In 2010 Ed Moloney's book 'Voices from the Grave' gave Brendan Hughes statement wider attention. A PSNI statement says that their interest in the Boston College project began with the publication of this book. McIntyre feels that the book should not have been published. In May 2011 the PSNI began legal action to get access to the Boston tapes archive. McIntyre recalls his horror. Jack Dunn says that all involved were convinced that no government entity would come looking for the tapes. In January 2012 Judge W Young ruled that all information relating to the McConville case should be handed over, which was 85 interviews done with 7 IRA members. On appeal the number was reduced to 11 interviews, including one with Dolores Price. Declan Lawn says that it was this information that led to Gerry Adams arrest. Anthony McIntyre gives his reaction, and says that he is worried about his own security. Sinn Fein believes that the arrest is part of an agenda to harm the party. Martin McGuinness' press conference clip shown. Chief Constable Matt Baggott denies this. Then unionist commentator Alex Kane gives his views. Film of Falls Road rally, where Bobby Storey ups the rhetoric. Then Queens University Professor Richard English gives his analysis of the remarks. Then Gerry Adams comments on 'dubious' Boston College tapes that he terms as a project taken on by disgruntled, anti-peace process individuals. He went on to name Moloney and McIntyre as anti-peace process. Maloney says that this is intimidation by Adams. Then Sunday Times journalist Justine McCarthy says that this will lead to a surge in support for Sinn Fein in the south. Alex Kane says that Sinn Fein's problem is that prosecution of republican leaders for legacy cases is now on the agenda, and dissident republicans will be saying 'we told you so'. Anthony McIntyre agrees, as does Jack Dunn, who says that if the Boston tapes are given back to the individuals it will be a loss to history. Declan Lawn then profiles the other side of this story, of the suffering and loss of the McConville family. Their trauma was put to Gerry Adams in the BBC documentary 'The Disappeared'. Adams denies involvement. Darragh McIntyre comments on Michael McConville's statement that he knows who killed his mother but he is afraid to go to the PSNI with the names. Aged 11 Michael was threatened by the IRA. McIntyre describes what happened in 1972. The big question raised is 'how should we deal with the past?' Declan Lawn says the problem is that there is no consensus. Justine McCarthy gives her views, then Alex Kane. Anthony McIntyre says that collecting information about the troubles is a form of truth recovery in order for people to know what happened and why it happened. Declan Lawn says that it a history that remains dangerous.
DVD No.
D10310
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8201



Date Broadcast:
Wed 7th May 2014
Duration:
6 mins 21 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
At the Westminster inquiry into the On the Run (OTR) letters scheme PSNI Chief Constable Matt Baggott and Assistant Chief Constable Drew Harris reveal that 95 recipients of OTR letter are linked to 275 murders, but Matt Baggott stressed that this did not mean that they were guilty, and that they could still be prosecuted in new evidence emerged. Film report from Vincent Kearney shows Drew Harris saying that some of the OTRs were 'notorious'. The DUP's Ian Paisley Jr expresses his shock. 5 of the OTRs are currently being investigated because of new evidence coming from the Historical Enquiries Team (HET). The Public Prosecution Service (PPS) will decide what happens next. Also the PSNI are now currently checking 192 republicans who were sent letters to see if there is any new evidence against them, but that this will take 3 years. At the WAVE Trauma Centre today the McConville family planted a tree in Jean's memory. Film report with Bronagh McConville's reaction. In the Republic Alan Shatter has resigned as Minister for Justice over the issue of bugging scandals and other incidents. Film report. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10310
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8202



Date Broadcast:
Wed 7th May 2014
Duration:
45 mins 13 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The Nolan Show
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Stephen Nolan begins by outlining the main topic for tonight's show, the arrest last week of Sinn Fein President Gerry Adams for questioning about the 1972 abduction and murder of Jean McConville, and Sinn Fein's allegation that the arrest was politically motivated, and the various reactions to the claim that there were 'dark forces' in the PSNI who are against Sinn Fein and the peace process. Film clip shown of Bobby Storey's comments at a Falls Road rally, then Michael McConville's reaction to Bobby Storey's comments is shown in an interview. He says that Bobby Storey's 'we ain't going away, you know' was a threat to the McConville family and the two governments. He says that Storey's message to them was to shut their mouths, but Michael says that he will be fighting with every breath in his body. Next Stephen Nolan asks Sinn Fein's Conor Murphy what Bobby Storey meant. Conor Murphy replies that he was only expressing an anger that it seems to the Sinn Fein support base that not everyone is equal before the law. He refers to the Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers' refusal to pursue certain matters (Ballymurphy massacre, La Mon bombing announcements last week are mentioned) but yet it is ok to pursue other matters, such as the arrest of Gerry Adams. Bobby Storey was simply reflecting this anger in his audience to the two-track approach to dealing with legacy matters. He was speaking as Chairperson of Sinn Fein in the north. Then Stephen Nolan gets the reaction of the DUP's Gregory Campbell. He says that Sinn Fein took a calculated gamble with Adams saying that he was willing to be interviewed, thinking it would be in and out in about an hour, then Sinn Fein threw the rattle out of the pram and threatened to bring everything down unless Adams was released. Conor Murphy says that Sinn Fein is entitled to hold the police to account as the DUP do. Gregory Campbell says that they should have taken their complaint to the Ombudsman. Conor Murphy says that this is a serious legacy issue and he again accuses the police and the Northern Ireland Office (NIO) of adopting a twin-track approach to legacy issues and investigations. Murphy and Campbell argue this point back and forth, then the SDLP Dolores Kelly says that she supports the McConville family in all this and says that Sinn Fein are making Gerry Adams out to be a victim in all of this. She sees Bobby Storey's comments as a threat to the McConville family. The UUP's Mike Nesbitt says that the UUP was right in 2010 when they said that Northern Ireland was not ready for the devolution of policing and justice. He says that Sinn Fein crossed the line in their reaction to Adams arrest after Adams himself offered to speak to the police. Conor Murphy then defends Martin McGuinness' comments regarding 'dark forces' within the police and he claims that Martin McGuinness was not threatening to withdraw support for policing, just stating that they would re-double their efforts to achieve an accountable, progressive service. Mike Nesbitt says that Sinn Fein are covering their tracks. Then a question is asked from the audience, followed by Alliance's Steven Farry's views on McGuinness' remarks and says that he supports policing. Then Stephen Nolan highlights the DUP's Ruth Patterson's claims of political bias, which Gregory Campbell defends. He says that the police do make mistakes but that there is a mechanism for dealing with them. He says that the DUP followed this process over flags. Nolan recalls 1974 and Paisley saying that loyalists will have no time for the RUC. In 1986 he is shown saying 'don't come crying to me when your homes are attacked'. Again Campbell says that there is a process now. Stephen Nolan then shows footage of the McConville family event at WAVE on what would have been her 80th birthday. Then he interviews Michael McConville, who says that he remembers the day that the IRA took his mother away and the distress of her children holding on to her. He says that the images never leave him. Aged 11 he was grabbed by the IRA as he walked to his granny's. They put a hood over his head, took him to a house and tied him to a chair. They threatened to shoot him and stuck a knife in his leg. They let him go with a warning that they would shoot him or another family member if they talked about the IRA. Nolan then shows film footage of the children being interviewed after their mother's abduction. Michael says that the IRA knew that they would be left orphans and that the family would be split up. He recalls that Christmas. He recalls how the IRA brought back her purse and wedding ring. He says that even at 11 years of age he knew that she was dead. He recalls growing up in different homes. He then explains why he won't name the abductors, who he says he knows, as he is afraid that the IRA will kill one of his family. He recalls a veiled warning Adams gave him, which Adams denies. Nolan then shows Michael footage of Adams' comments at his press conference after his release. Michael says that if he really wants to help the McConville family he should give the names of the killers to the police. Michael says that he isn't out to smear Adams, but that he is going on the word of republicans who have described Adams' role in Jean's death. He says he knows Adams was in the IRA and was patronizing in his attitude towards the McConville family in his press conference. He says that he would prefer truth over justice at this moment. He says that he wants the killers named and shamed. He also mentions the murder being treated as a war crime and explains why he thinks this. He likens the IRA to the Nazis. In the studio Conor Murphy is asked for his reaction to the interview. He says that he is extremely sorry for the family and for the injustice suffered at the hands of republicans. He says that the McConvilles should be able to pursue any avenue of justice that they want. He is pushed about naming and shaming the killers. He says that any truth recovery process would be part of Haas. He accuses the Police Association of trying to prevent inquiries into the truth. He says that Sinn Fein is in favour of victims truth into what happened. He then clashes with Dolores Kelly over the two-tier approach being adopted by the British. He says that Dolores Kelly is lying. Then Stephen Nolan asks John Teggert of the Ballymurphy families, who is in the audience, would he prefer truth or justice, to which he replies why can't he have both? He says that nobody is above the law and asks why are unionists shying away from the past where the state is involved? He rejects the myth that only 10% of the deaths in the troubles were caused by the state, as that doesn't include loyalists or republicans who were state agents. Then John Eaglesham, whose father was killed by the IRA, is asked whether he wants truth or justice. He says both. Stephen Nolan questions him on this, as he doubts that Sinn Fein or the IRA will ever tell the truth. Then Patricia McBride, a former Victims' Commissioner, gives her views on the failure to deal with past in Northern Ireland. She calls on the two governments to take a role. She highlights the HET giving special privileges to former soldiers who are being interviewed, then the UUP's Mike Nesbitt mentions a pension for the seriously injured. He and Dolores Kelly argue over the benefits of Haas. Then Steven Farry calls for limited immunity rather than an amnesty.
DVD No.
D10310
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8203



Date Broadcast:
Thu 8th May 2014
Duration:
8 mins 14 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then news report on the new row between the DUP's Peter Robinson and Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness as both men attend the opening of the Giro D'Italia in Belfast. Mark Devenport outlines the details of Martin McGuinness' anger. A film clip shows McGuinness accusing Robinson of lacking leadership in not condemning UVF attacks in east Belfast against the Alliance Party and immigrants. He calls the DUP cowards. The DUP says that the allegations are outrageous. Then at Belfast City Hall the two men avoid confrontation and instead talk positively about the launch of the Giro D'Italia and issues that they do agree on. The Victims' Commissioner Kathryn Stone has presented a paper to the Executive where she has recommended a pension for those seriously injured during the troubles, but the DUP's Peter Robinson says that no former paramilitaries should benefit. Film report begins with Martina Purdy interviewing victim Paul Gallagher about the troubles pension campaign and the eligibility 'roadblock'. Then Kathryn Stone is interviewed and comments on a small minority blocking the issue for a large majority of disabled victims getting a pension. Then Kenny Donaldson of the South East Fermanagh Foundation (SEFF) says that victims groups support the idea of a pension but that injured terrorists must be excluded. Martina Purdy then interviews Peter Robinson on the issue. He is also against injured former terrorists getting a pension. In the courts a charge of IRA membership against Pauric Wilson, Seamus Finucane, Breige Wright and Agnes McCrory has been dropped. Film report.
DVD No.
D10310
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8204



Date Broadcast:
Thu 8th May 2014
Duration:
18 mins 46 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The Victims Commissioner Kathryn Stone has announced proposals that would give seriously injured troubles victims a pension. Film report with Paul Gallagher interview. It also reviews the Eames/Bradley initiative in 2009 being rejected over a £12000 payment. Then Graham Harrison, injured in the 1993 Shankill bombing, gives his reaction to the pension idea. Then the DUP's Peter Robinson says that no former paramilitaries should get a pension, but Martin McGuiness feels that loyalist and republican ex-combatants should be supported. Then in the studio Victims Commissioner Kathryn Stone explains why she feels that these proposals can be acceptable where Eames/Bradley was not. She wants to give dignity to the seriously injured in their old age. When asked about bombers getting it she says that we shouldn't let a small number of people prevent the majority of the needy getting a pension. Then eligibility issue is currently being worked on. She also comments on individual victims getting an apology and how that might work. She says that these proposals come from victims themselves and for her that is the priority. She denies that she is leaving the job due to frustration. In the studio Jennifer McNern from WAVE, who lost both legs in the Abercorn Bar bomb, Alan Bracknell from the Pat Finucane Centre, whose father was murdered in south Armagh by the Glenanne Gang, Mark Donaldson from Relatives for Justice and Kenny Donaldson of SEFF give their reactions to the pensions proposals and their views on the eligibility issue, with the main debate being between Mark Thompson and Kenny Donaldson, who differ on the way forward. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10310
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8205



Date Broadcast:
Thu 8th May 2014
Duration:
35 mins 12 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers says that today we heard about another proposal for dealing with the past, but he wonders whether anyone is listening. He then interviews the Victims' Commissioner Kathryn Stone about her proposal to award a pension to people seriously injured during the troubles. Mark Carruthers says that this is a week where the past has dominated the present, with the Adams arrest, more information on the On The Run (OTR) scheme and Martin McGuiness' criticism of the British government's 'dismal failure' to address the Haas proposals. He also accuses the Tory government of meeting the DUP but yet refusing to meet Sinn Fein. Then Martin McGuinness says that he supports the idea of a pension by for people seriously injured in the troubles, but on the eligibility issue he says that he wants it awarded to everyone who was seriously injured, no matter who they are. Mark Carruthers then asks Kathryn Stone about her Way Forward document released today. Also joining the discussion is Dennis Bradley, co-author of the Eames/Bradley report and the DUP's Jeffrey Donaldson. Firstly Jeffrey Donaldson denies that the DUP are getting any special access to No 10 Downing Street, then he reveals that they met Prime Minister David Cameron to discuss Libyan funds being made available to victims of IRA violence using Semtex provided by Colonel Gaddafi. He also refutes Martin McGuinness' description of the DUP as cowards for not standing up to UVF hate crimes in east Belfast. Kathryn Stone then comments on Mark Carruthers suggestion that her Way Forward document isn't worth the paper it is written on as Peter Robinson has already ruled out former terrorists getting a pension. She says that the provision for a troubles pension is in the DUP election manifesto, and she wonders how he could reject those proposals as the come from disabled victims themselves. She mentions the WAVE victims' group and says that she wants to give disabled victims dignity in their later years. Mark Carruthers points out that the DUP manifesto says that they support the pension for 'innocent' victims. Kathryn Stone says that it works within the definition of a victim as it currently stands. She says that she represents all victims. She says that the Commission is currently working on specific details and will have them by mid-June. In recent weeks the past has come to the fore and these disabled victims have suffered much and need the public and politicians' attention. Denis Bradley says that there is momentum with the issue, through firstly the Eames/Bradley process, then the Haas process. He praises the report and criticizes Peter Robinson's response to it as insulting to Kathryn Stone. Bradley says that it all about the DUP looking to change the definition of a victim. He calls on them to implement the proposals no matter how difficult it is in order to help the three or four hundred people who were seriously injured during the troubles. Victims need the pension and if Stormont cannot do it then the two governments should do it. The current definition won't be changed. Jeffrey Donaldson thanks Kathryn Stone for her work with victims. He says that Peter Robinson is reflecting concerns within the unionist community. He gives a different version of political compromise to Denis Bradley. He and Denis argue about the current definition of a victim and the likelihood of it being changed. He says that he supports the idea of a pension but that he does not agree with anyone with a criminal conviction getting it. In the case of an injured UDR man he does not want this be equated with an injured IRA member on the pension issue. Denis and Jeffrey clashed on this. For the next item, a film report from Shane Harrison looks at the role of the Irish & British governments in the peace process, with questions now being asked. Independent journalist David McKittrick gives his opinion on what the two governments should be doing to create momentum in Northern Ireland politics. Then Fianna Fail's Brendan Smith gives his ideas on what would improve Northern Irish politics. The Irish government feels that Haas should have gotten more support. Then Labour TD Ged Nash's views. Then Labour's Shadow Northern Ireland Secretary of State Ivan Lewis says that the peace process only moves forward when the two governments are involved. Next, with two weeks to go to the European election Mark Carruthers interviews the UUP's candidate Jim Nicholson and the SDLP candidate about their role in Europe and their policies and chances of victory. They are also asked about their views in a future referendum on EU membership. The SDLP are for staying in, whereas Jim Nicholson is in favour of a re-negotiation and then a referendum. Then commentators Rick Wilford and Deirdre Heenan comment on the victims' pension issue and the eligibility problems, and what exactly do we mean when we say victim?
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8206



Date Broadcast:
Mon 12th May 2014
Duration:
8 mins 36 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
A car bomb found near Dublin is believed to have been intended for use in Northern Ireland by dissident republicans. A Belfast man has been arrested. Film report from Lucan. In Stormont Martin McGuinness has launched a verbal attack on unionists over their lack of response to racist attacks in east Belfast. He also called on the UVF to cease these attacks. Film report with Ken Reid's analysis. The former leader of the PUP before David Ervine took over in 2002, Hugh Smyth, has died of cancer. Ken Reid comments on his career. Sinn Fein today launched its European Election manifesto in Dublin & Belfast. Film report with Gerry Adams' comments that his arrest has galvanized the Sinn Fein membership's attitude to the peace process but that the arrest has not been beneficial to either Sinn Fein or his family. (Mon 6pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8207



Date Broadcast:
Tue 13th May 2014
Duration:
5 mins 30 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then at Westminster's Northern Ireland Affairs Committee hearing former UUP leader David Trimble says that he was shocked and hurt that former Prime Minister Tony Blair kept him in the dark about a secret process to deal with the On The Runs (OTR) scheme. Trimble says that he felt deceived. Film report. Trimble says that the first that he knew about the scheme was when the judge in the John Downey case mentioned it. Boston College is to be sued by four former paramilitaries who contributed to the Boston Tapes project. The lead case is being taken by former IRA member Richard O'Rawe. The PSNI say that their investigation into a BBC Pamorama programme about killings by the British army's Military Reaction Force has found no admission of criminality by those who featured in it. Film report with solicitor Padraig O'Muirigh's reaction, saying that he doesn't believe the PSNI carried out a thorough investigation. In courts Belfast man Sam Devlin (53) is charged with having a car bomb in Dublin yesterday. (Tues .30pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8208



Date Broadcast:
Tue 13th May 2014
Duration:
3 mins 38 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
No opening titles. In Derry an inquest has been held into the Real IRA (RIRA) killing of Kieran Doherty, a former dissident republican prisoner. The inquest heard that the main suspect has himself being killed. Film report on February 2010 killing with old film clips. Kieran Doherty had claimed that he was being harassed by MI5, who were trying to recruit him as an informer. The man suspected of killing Doherty was Peter Butterly, who was himself killed in Co Meath. Then in the studio Kieran's uncle, Vincent Coyle, gives the family's reaction to the inquest revelations and the government report denying the allegations against MI5.
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8209



Date Broadcast:
Wed 14th May 2014
Duration:
6 mins 2 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
After 30 years the conviction of Martin McAuley in 1982 for arms offences could be overturned. This conviction was linked to the RUC's 'Shoot to kill' policy of that time. Michael Tighe (17) was shot dead in the same incident. FIlm report also recalls that McAuley was one of the 'Colombia 3', who were accused of training FARC anti-government rebels in Colombia. Today the prosecution service said that it would not oppose McAuley's appeal against his 1982 conviction as a secret MI5 recording of the 1982 shooting was not made public at his trial. Film report reviews the 1982 shooting with old film clips and a film recording of an interview with McAuley in the 1990s. The secret MI5 recording was discover by John Stalker's Inquiry into the RUC Shoot to kill policy. The recording was destroyed. Solicitor Fearghal Shiels gives his reaction. Martin McAuley was not in court as he is facing extradition to Colombia for training FARC rebels. An Orange Hall was attacked with paint at Glenavy, Co Antrim last night. Film report. Survivors of the 1974 Dublin/Monaghan bombings are to sue the British government of alleged collusion with loyalists and a subsequent cover-up by the British state. A tenth man has admitted to lesser charges in the trial in Coleraine of the killing of Catholic man Kevin McDaid. Two defendants still face more serious charges. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8210



Date Broadcast:
Thu 15th May 2014
Duration:
11 mins 28 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Twenty years ago this coming Sunday in Armagh Gavin McShane and his friend Shane McArdle, both 17, were shot dead by the UVF in a taxi depot. No one has ever been charged with killing the two schoolboys. It has emerged that vital evidence and files in relation to the case have been destroyed. Now Gavin McShane's family are bringing a civil case against the Chief Constable and asking the Police Ombudsman to examine how the RUC investigated the double murder. The PSNI have made no comment. Film report from Jane Loughrey with interviews from Gavin's mother and sister on the 18/5/1994 murders and their fight for justice. In March 2007 police admitted that Gavin's clothing was destroyed in a fire in Gough barracks and that his files were also destroyed when asbestos was found in the barracks. The family solicitor, John Finucane, comments on the police's failings. Then Mark Thompson of Relatives for Justice outlines his views on the RUC's forensic failings. His mother vows to catch the killers. Two men charged in connection with the killing of Catholic man Kevin McDaid in Coleraine on 29/5/2009 have been acquitted after the prosecution offered no evidence against David Cochrane (52) and Phillip Kane (39). Film report with SDLP MLA John Dallat's reaction to the case decision today and the feelings of the McDaid family regarding the lack of robustness in the police inquiry. In Derry 3 men have been jailed for 30 years for having a bomb in their car. Damien Harkin, Neil Hegarty & Jason Coleman all pleaded guilty. Report on a stabbing in Belfast. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
541
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8211



Date Broadcast:
Mon 19th May 2014
Duration:
13 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Stormont Today
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Introduced by Mark Carruthers, the section of the programme recorded covers events at Stormont today when the DUP's Peter Robinson hits back at Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness over his allegation of unionist cowardice over UVF racist attacks in east Belfast. Film clip covers Robinson's statement at question time. He says that he won't take lessons on cowardice from Sinn Fein, and he highlights the cowardice of republicans in the 1972 abduction and murder of Jean McConville. He rejects the demonization of east Belfast and says that he does condemn racist attacks. Then commentator Alex Kane comments on current Sinn Fein/DUP relations, and on another statement from Martin McGuinness this afternoon where he says that Peter Robinson missed his point as he was he was talking about the here and now, not the past. Also today it was question time for the Alliance Justice Minister David Ford. He stated to the chamber that he had no knowledge that Gerry Adams was going to be arrested last week. He also comments on a question from Michaela Boyle as to whether the Secretary of State Theresa Villiers had foreknowledge of the arrest and a further question form the DUP's Paul Givan enquiring as to why Gerry Adams was not charged in relation to this case, and also what he knew about his brother Liam's rape allegations. Sinn Fein's Declan McAleer asks him about racist attacks in east Belfast and whether this is ethnic cleansing. Then David Ford makes a statement on policing costs for the Orange protest camp at Twadell Avenue, followed by a question on that issue from Sinn Fein's Bronwyn McGahan. Then commentator Alex Kane gives his reaction to David Ford's performance at question time.
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8212



Date Broadcast:
Tue 20th May 2014
Duration:
7 mins 42 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In the appeal court Martin McAuley, one of the 'Colombia 3', has been cleared of a controversial arms charge during an alleged RUC 'shoot to kill' operation in 1982 where Michael Tighe (17) was killed. Film report hears evidence that MI5 recorded the killing and then destroyed the tape. That was discovered by John Stalker's inquiry. Vincent Kearney reports with old film clips. Details of the Stalker/Sampson report on this issue were made known for the first time today in the Appeal Court, including the RUC cover-up, and what was on the tape before it was destroyed. Lord Chief Justice Declan Morgan rules that McAuley's conviction was unsafe. His wife gives her reaction. The Coroner's Court is to ask the State Pathologist to review evidence relating to the ten people shot dead in the 1971 Ballymurphy massacre. The also instructed a M.O.D lawyer to find out if the military weapons used were still in existence and to ensure that they are not destroyed. Film report says that the family of Joseph Murphy want his body exhumed as his remains still have the army bullet lodged in him. In the High Court the families of 6 men shot dead either by loyalists or the British army are to be given £7,500 in compensation due to the delay in their inquests. Film report reviews the cases of James McMenamin, Pearse Jordan, Fearghal McCusker, Neil McConville, Michael Ryan and Stephen Caldwell then solicitor Padraig O'Muirigh comments. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8213



Date Broadcast:
Tue 20th May 2014
Duration:
9 mins 40 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of court decision to award £7,500 compensation to the families of 6 victims because of delays in having their inquests. 3 of the men were members of the IRA. Film report begins with IRA member Peter Ryan's death in 1991 at the hands of the SAS and the comments of his son, Sean Ryan, regarding his father being in the IRA and him getting this money, and also what he hopes to learn from an inquest. Other cases mentioned are Pearse Jordan, an IRA member killed by the RUC in 1992 and James McMenamin (29) knocked down by a PSNI vehicle in 2005. His relatives comment and then a statement from Justice Minister David Ford (Alliance). Back in the studio solicitor Padraig O'Muirigh and Kenny Donaldson from Innocent Victims United discuss the judge's decision and their views in it. Padraig O'Muirigh outlines what the families want, Kenny Donaldson says that he understands the loss of a family member but objects to giving taxpayers money to terrorists who died due to their own actions. The solicitor tells him that the award was for the delay in the inquest, not the circumstances of the death. 3 of the cases were post-conflict. It's all about delays in the inquests and the problem is systematic. (Tues 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8214



Date Broadcast:
Wed 21st May 2014
Duration:
3 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
Ulster Television (UTV)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines, then an inquest judge may order a soldier's prosecution over the death of schoolboy Francis Rowntree in April 1972. He was killed by a plastic bullet fired by a British soldier. Film report on the 11 year old's death with old film clips and details of the 2012 HET investigation which said that he was an innocent bystander. The injuries were from a direct hit to the head and also a ricochet. Soldier B who fired the bullet says that he cannot give evidence to the inquiry due to his ill-health. A new witness has come forward who will give evidence. (Wed 6pm)
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8215



Date Broadcast:
Wed 21st May 2014
Duration:
5 mins 42 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
An internal row in Northern Ireland's new political party NI21 threatens to split the party. Basil McCrea and John McCallister have fallen out over whether to designate the party as 'unionist' or 'other'. Film report with journalists' comments, then Basil McCrea, then commentator Alex Kane's views. The PSNI say they are investigation a hate crime motive after Pastor Jack McConnell of Whitewell Tabernacle labelled the religion of Islam as 'heathen' and 'satanic'. Film report with film clip of his words last Sunday with reaction from Dr Raied Al-Wazzan of the Islamic Centre in Belfast. Then Pastor McConnell denies what he said was a hate crime and says he won't apologise.
DVD No.
D10320
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8216



Date Broadcast:
Thu 22nd May 2014
Duration:
34 mins 28 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Mark Carruthers interviews the deputy leader of Northern Ireland's new political party, NI21, John McCallister about the current internal fallout within the party and allegations of inappropriate sexual activity against party leader Basil McCrea. John McCallister says that an attempt was made to oust him from the party this week when he tried to investigate the allegations against Mr McCrea. First a film report from Gareth Gordon reviews the short history of the party, and the promise of fresh politics that they offered, yet it turned on itself on the eve of its first election. The issue was said to be regarding whether they designated themselves as 'unionist' or as 'other' but candidate Ian Dickson says that the issue was not raised with him. Then candidate Ben Matthews says that he suspects that other issues were at play that he doesn't know about. Then former Director of Communications Jon Rainey says that the designation issue was raised as an attempt to get John McCallister to leave the party in order to prevent him from impeaching Basil McCrea and 47 new candidates are caught in the crossfire. One of them, Barbara Neeson, gives her views. Then Mark Carruthers asks John McCallister about the allegation that the designation issue was inserted as an attempt to oust him as he asked a human resources company to investigate the allegations of inappropriate sexual conduct against Basil McCrea. John McCallister recalls what happened on the Tuesday at a party meeting on designation, completely out of the blue, days before the polls opened. He explains his logic in saying that this was directed at removing him. Basil denies any wrongdoing but wasn't happy at a wellbeing inquiry days before the election. He lists the other rumours put out about him, including that he was about to re-join the UUP. John McCallister comments on his relationship with Basil McCrea now, and how to fix it. He comments on why he has chosen to go public now just before the election, and on whether he will ever work with Basil McCrea again. He apologises to NI21 candidates and voters. Next Mark Carruthers interviews Basil McCrea and what John McCallister intended to do about them. Basil McCrea says that he has done nothing wrong and has never engaged in any inappropriate behaviour. He says no allegations have as yet been put to him. The Carecall Company has not contacted him and he says that he has not tried to stop the inquiry. He denies that he is using the designation issue to try and get John McCallister out of the party. He claims that he raised it as it was an issue raised with him whilst canvassing and he says that he raised the issue in a leaders' speech months ago. He mentions a 'dirty tricks' campaign against NI21 as they have rocked the political status quo. Next, Mark Carruthers introduces a film report that covers the European and local council election campaigns and the dramas during it, including the Adams arrest. Then in the studio Mark Devenport gives his analysis of the situation within NI21. Meanwhile Tina McKenzie has just resigned from the NI21 Executive, along with two other members. Then Rick Wilford gives his views on NI21's future, if any. He doesn't think that the relationship between the two leaders can be fixed. Then Deirdre Heenan gives her reaction and her thoughts on NI21's appeal. She can't see a way back for them. Then Mark Devenport comments on what he calls the 'Ant & Dec' of Ulster politics coming to an end. Rick Wilford calls it political immaturity. Then the three commentators give their views on the election itself and the turnout issue as results come in on Friday, Saturday & Sunday and the possible leadership consequences. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8217



Date Broadcast:
Fri 23rd May 2014
Duration:
15 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Firstly the state of play in the 2014 district council elections and details of the seats won so far (DUP 24, UUP 23, Sinn Fein 21, SDLP 7, Alliance 3, Independents 3 and TUV 2). Turnout was 50.9%. Then coverage of the latest situation within the NI21 party. Its leader Basil McCrea denies doing anything wrong but admits that he is facing allegations of inappropriate sexual behaviour. Film report on today's events from Mark Simpson which looks at the events in the party since its formation, Basil McCrea's denials of any wrongdoing and John McCallister's comments on The View last night (Thurs). NI21 candidate Adam Murray's views, then NI21's Tina McKenzie's views. The woman who made the claim against Basil McCrea, Ashleigh Murray, a former party worker, says that the allegations go back to last year and she says that she didn't go to the police as she didn't think that anyone would believe her. Next, back to the election where Stephen Walker's film report looks at the counts in the new 11 council areas where 900 hopefuls chase 460 seats. In Lisburn Luke Poots of the DUP (Son of Edwin) has been elected. He gives an interview. In Mid-Ulster Independent Republican Barry Monteith is elected. Martin McGuinness predicts that Sinn Fein will be the largest party in on the Mid-Ulster council. In Belfast 1 vote separated Sinn Fein's Mairtin O'Muilleoir and the SDLP's Claire Hanna. In east Belfast the Alliance's Michael Long has been elected. Tina McKenzie got 256 votes. In Fermanagh the UUP's Tom Elliott comments on his party doing well. Then in Belfast Mark Devenport comments on the results so far, with People Before Profit's Gerry Carroll looking set to be elected in Balmoral. He also comments on NI21's poor performance. Then Mervyn Jess reports from Lisburn where 7 DUP councilors have been elected, 2 UUP, 1 Alliance & 1 SDLP and he says that NI21 are polling well against the Alliance Party. In the Derry/Strabane count Kieron Tourish reports that Independents are doing well, Sinn Fein will be the top party and the SDLP the big losers. In Coleraine Will Leach says that 2 DUP councillors have been elected, then in Omagh Julian fowler says that turnout is down, Sinn Fein have had four councillors elected and will be the largest party on the council with the UUP also doing well. US Envoy Richard Haas is in Dublin and London this week to meet the two governments but he says that he won't be attending the NI leaders meeting in Belfast. Film report from Shane Harrison with interview with Richard Haas on the role of mediators. Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers will be in Dublin on Thursday for talks with the Irish government. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8218



Date Broadcast:
Sat 24th May 2014
Duration:
30 mins 24 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
UTV Election Special
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The counts are almost complete. A state of the parties board shows who has won what to date, with the DUP at 110, Sinn Fein at 81, SDLP 50, UUP 60, Alliance 26, others 32 and the share of the votes was DUP 23.1%, Sinn Fein 24.1%, SDLP 13.6%, UUP 16.1%, Alliance 6.7% and others 16.5%. Then the figures for each parties' change from the last election it is DUP -4.1%, Sinn Fein -0.7%, SDLP -1.4%, UUP +0.9%, Alliance -0.7%, others +6.1%. Then Paul Clark gets the opinion of his panel beginning with Ken Reid's analysis of the election statistics. Then Paul Clark shows the results so far in Belfast, with Ulster University's Deirdre Heenan's comments. She says that the Alliance will hold the balance of power in Belfast after the election and the UUP has increased its vote for the first time in 20 years. Then Tracy Magee is live at City Hall with an update on Duncan Morrow of the Alliance eliminated and the struggle for the last seats, but it could be after midnight before all the seats are counted. Then in the studio Queens University Belfast's Peter Shirlow gives his analysis. He says that the PUP is doing better than people expected, as has the TUV in Belfast. Then it's over to Marc Mallett who interviews UUP leader Mike Nesbitt and the DUP's Ian Paisley Jr, who comments on the DUP's vote going down. He says that they are still the dominant voice within unionism. Mike Nesbitt is happy with the UUP vote. He says that they are on the way back. Both comment on the shredding of the unionist vote, and the role of the smaller parties in this. They discuss unionist cooperation to enhance the unionist vote, but there are no current inter-party talks going on around that issue according to Mike Nesbitt, but Ian Paisley Jr says that there are. Then Paul Clark shows the final turnout in Mid-Ulster is DUP 17.6%, Sinn Fein 41%, SDLP 13.8%, UUP 17.4%, others 9.6%, Alliance 0.7% given a seat count of Sinn Fein 18, DUP 8, SDLP 6, UUP 7 and 1 other. Turnout was 58.6%. Then the final figures for Antrim & Newtownabbey Council, with DUP 15, Sinn Fein 3, SDLP 4, UUP 12, Alliance 4 and others 2. The share of voting is DUP 32.2%, Sinn Fein 12.4%, SDLP 8.6%, UUP 22%, Alliance 12.7% and others 12%. The turnout was 54.6%. In Newry & Mourne, where there are 11 seats still to be won, the total so far is DUP 4, Sinn Fein 11, SDLP 9, UUP 3, Alliance 1 and others 2. Then it's up to the Derry/Strabane count where Mark McFadden gives a live update where he expects Sinn Fein to be the largest party on the new council, and he highlights the election of Independent councilors, some of whom are aligned to dissident republicans such as Gary Donnelly, who is linked to the 32 County Sovereignty Movement. He topped the poll in his area with 1100 votes. It could end up with 4 Independents on the council. The SDLP, on the other hand, are not doing so well and have lost two seats already. Back in the studio Paul Clark talks to his panel of Deirdre Heenan, Ken Reid and Peter Shirlow. The give their reactions to Mike Nesbitt and Ian Paisley Jr's comment on unionist cooperation and unionist unity. Ken Reid says that the 2004 Westminster election failed to show this working. It's announced that the TUV have a 5th seat in Antrim. Back to unionist unity. Ken Reid says that they had a unity candidate in Fermanagh/South Tyrone at the last election and he was unsuccessful and there haven't been unity candidates in other areas. He said that discussions on unionist unity have not worked. Peter Shirlow then comments on unionist unity, saying that he thinks that it will come in a generation or so. Deirdre Heenan comments on Sinn Fein getting the highest percentage share of the vote, and also on Sinn Fein/SDLP transfers. Then it's over to Marc Mallett who interviews the SDLP's Alasdair McDonnell and Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey. Maskey says that Sinn Fein has expanded and consolidated their vote. McDonnell denies that the SDLP are losing seats. It vote is down 1.4% He says that they will get the 67 seats that they had before the election. He says that he has renewed the SDLP and they have 10 new faces across the councils. He says that the new council boundaries were a carve-up between the DUP & Sinn Fein to wipe out the SDLP. Alex Maskey rejects this as nonsense. The subject of national unity is raised and both men shout each other down. Back to Ken Reid, who gives his views on the crisis within Northern Ireland this week and their electoral collapse. Deirdre Heenan comments on the Green Party's Claire Bailey's chances of success, and also the TUV's success. Peter Shirlow also talks about the TUV success and the reasons behind it. Ken Reid also mentions the unease in some DUP areas about the coalition with Sinn Fein. They then look to the European election count, which is starting soon and finally a current state of the parties board with DUP 115, Sinn Fein 88, SDLP 55, UUP 81, Alliance 27 and others 34.
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8219



Date Broadcast:
Sat 24th May 2014
Duration:
4 mins 14 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of latest council election results, with 50 seats still to be filled. The DUP have 124, Sinn Fein 96, UUP 84, SDLP 62, Alliance 28, Independent 14, TUV 13 and others 10. Then report from Stephen Walker in Belfast where the TUV's Joleen Bunting has won their first ever seat in Belfast. She comments on her aims. Alliance's Nuala McAllister has won a seat in north Belfast. David Ford comments. In Banbridge the UUP's Doug Beattie has been elected. He comments, then the DUP's Peter Robinson talks down the rise in the UUP vote. In Lisburn, despite the turmoil within the party they have managed to get a councillor, Johnny McCarthy elected. He gives his reaction, then the SDLP's Alban Magennis comments on the drop in their vote. In Derry Independent Republican Gary Donnelly has won a seat. He gives his reaction. Then is Belfast Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams says that he was pleased with the party's vote. In Lisburn 3 men have been arrested after a racist attack on the towpath, and last night in east Belfast a house was attacked in a hate crime. (Sat 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8220



Date Broadcast:
Sun 25th May 2014
Duration:
9 mins 25 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
All the new 'super-council' councillors have been elected in the 11 councils, with the DUP & Sinn Fein having the majority of seats. Final state of the parties board is shown with the DUP on 130, Sinn Fein 105, UUP 88, SDLP 66, Alliance 32, others 31 (this includes 13 TUV, 4 PUP, 4 Greens, 3 UKIP, 1 NI21). Then a film report from Sarah Moore looks over the new political landscape with Northern Ireland's new 11 super-councils, with comments from the DUP's Jeffrey Donaldson then Sinn Fein's Gerry Adams. Then the UUP's performance is highlighted. Could it mean a UUP/DUP pact for the Westminster election? In Derry Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness comments on them now being the largest party in the city instead of the SDLP, with reaction from Alasdair McDonnell. The Alliance's David Ford comments on the party's success in east Belfast. Newly elected NI21 councillor Johnny McCarthy comments on his election. The TUV's vote doubled. In the studio Ken Reid gives his analysis of the results and the parties' performances. Then a film report profiles the new powers available to the new councils and their bigger budgets from April 2015. (Sun 7pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8221



Date Broadcast:
Mon 26th May 2014
Duration:
10 mins 25 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Sinn Fein's Martina Anderson has topped the European election poll. Film report shows the announcement of first preference votes cast. Jim Allister (TUV) 75,806, Martina Anderson (SF) 159,813, Alex Attwood (SDLP) 81,594, M Brotherson (NI Conservatives) 4144, Ross Brown (Greens) 10,398, Dianne Dodds (DUP) 131,163), Anna Lo (Alliance) 44432, Tina McKenzie (NI21) 10,553, Jim Nicholson (UUP) 83,438, Henry Reilly (UKIP) 24,584. Then film report from Mark Simpson with Dianne Dodds and Martina Anderson's comments. Next a review of the council election of the TUV's Joleene Bunting on her comments on Facebook 3 year years ago that 'poor Catholic bastards' should go down to Ireland and fly their flags there. Jim Allister defends Miss Bunting. NI21's Basil McCrea makes no comment on his situation. Then analysis of 1st preference votes from Mark Devenport. And possible outcomes. In the Republic Labour leader Eamon Gilmore has resigned as party leader after their share of the vote dropped to 7%. Film report with Eamon Gilmore's resignation comments. Shane Harrison's analysis of Gilmore's resignation and Sinn Fein's performance. In Dundalk Gardai arrest 5 men with a beer keg bomb. (Bank Holiday Monday, 6.45pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8222



Date Broadcast:
Mon 26th May 2014
Duration:
8 mins 20 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Coverage of European election first preference votes, with Sinn Fein's Martina Anderson elected on the first count. Film coverage of electoral officer's announcement of votes cast. Then state of the parties chart as eliminations begin. Firstly the Conservative candidate, then share of votes chart shows Sinn Fein 25.5%, DUP 20.9%, UUP 13.3%, SDLP 13%, TUV 12.1%, Alliance 7.1%. These figures are then compared to the last European election. Then a film report with Martina Anderson (SF) and Diane Dodds (DUP) comments. Then live to Tara Mills for the latest news and Gareth Gordon on the slow progress and Chief Electoral Officer Graham Shields views on that. (Mon 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8223



Date Broadcast:
Tue 27th May 2014
Duration:
14 mins 30 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The European vote count is over. Martina Anderson (Sinn Fein), Dianne Dodds (DUP) and Jim Nicholson (UUP) all kept their seats. First preference votes cast are shown and compared to the 2009 election. Film report from Mark Simpson reviews the two day count and the winning parties' celebrations. In council elections Sinn Fein won 157 seats in the south and 105 in the north. They are the largest party on Belfast and Derry councils. Francie Molloy MP comments on their success, but the DUP's Peter Robinson says that the Sinn Fein vote in the south is only a protest vote. Next report examines why the King's Hall count took so long. Nigel Dodds (DUP) and Chief Electoral Officer Graham Shields comments on the need for technology. Then political editors Mark Devenport in Northern Ireland and Shane Harrison in the south give their analysis of the European elections and slow counts, with Sinn Fein gaining 4 European seats in Eire. Shane Harrison comments on the rise in the Sinn Fein vote, then Mark Devenport's views on the effects of the election results on the leaders' talks at Stormont. Tonight's BBC Spotlight programme 'Death on the Border' (D10340) looks at allegations of IRA/Garda collusion in other border attacks following the Smithwick report last December. Tonight's programme is to look at new claims. (Tues 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10330
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8224



Date Broadcast:
Tue 27th May 2014
Duration:
39 mins 50 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
Spotlight
Programme Title:
Death on the Border
Description:
Six months after the Smithwick Inquiry found that there was Garda/IRA collusion in the 1989 killings of RUC Superintendents Breen & Buchanan. Stephen Dempster finds out why there are concerns about other killings such as Judge Gibson and his wife in April 1987, RUC Constable Tracy Doak in May 1985 and Ian Sproule. Former UUP leader David Trimble believes that collusion was systematic along the border. After the opening titles Stephen Dempster reviews the reaction among the Garda Heirarchy to the Smithwick findings. Even though Smithwick could not identify the Garda Officer involved he still ruled that there was collusion. Film clip shows Garda Commissioner Martin Callinan's reaction. Then Stephen Dempster switches to the case of RUC Constable Tracy Doak, killed on 20/5/1985. Her mother Jean Doak explains her suspicions. Tracy was part of an RUC patrol on the border. She was meant to meet up with a Garda patrol to help escort a Brinks Mat money shipment over the border near Newry. A roadside bomb was detonated Tracy was killed along with 3 colleagues William Wilson, David Baird & Stephen Rodgers. Tracy's father Beattie Doak recalls getting the news and his last conversation with his daughter about getting her transferred out of Newry. At the border Stephen Dempster asks the question that Beattie Doak has always been asking. How did the IRA know that the RUC were going to be there? A Historical Enquiries Team (HET) report stated that IRA surveillance could have predicted that the RUC's location, but it says that the IRA also knew the day the RUC would be on the road. Beattie Doak says that he believes that a Garda mole was involved. Two years later in 1987, on the same road, Lord Justice Gibson and his wife were killed in a similar bomb attack. Again it went off after they left their Garda escort at the border. In 2001 the Gibson case was part of the trading of the peace process meeting at Weston Park. David Trimble recalls the 'political horse-trading' regarding inquiries both north and south. This led to Judge Peter Cory examining 6 cases of collusion, 3 proposed by nationalists and 3 by unionists. The Gibson case wasn't recommended for a public inquiry as Gibson's travel arrangements were widely known. Judge Cory knew of suspicions about a Garda Officer in the Judge Gibson case but did not recommend it for a public inquiry. Stephen Dempster says that we now know that Judge Corey's decision was wrong. He explains what the Smithwick inquiry revealed. David Trimble wants a public inquiry. In a statement the Gibson's daughter, Rosemary Nixon, also wants the case re-opened and rejects Cory's view. At the Smithwick inquiry an RUC Assistant Chief Constable said that they had evidence that a rogue Garda Officer was involved in the Gibson killings. Solicitor John McBirney comments on ACC Harris' comments, and suspicions of other border incidents, like the July 1988 killing of the Hanna family, Robin and Maureen Hanna, and their 6 year old son David. The IRA had intended to kill another judge but made a mistake in identifying the car. In a 4 year period 11 other people were killed in similar circumstances, however in November 1989 the Garda, with RUC help, denied that there were any leaks. Film clips shown of interviews. However Smithwick overturned this finding. Sunday Times journalist John Mooney comments on Smithwick's findings and Garda denials. Smithwick stated that the Gardai prizes loyalty over honesty. In Castlederg John Sproule recalls the April 1981 killing of his brother Ian and the phone-call they received from the IRA. Then a news report from weeks earlier regarding a Garda document that stated that they suspected that Ian was a UVF member that ended up in the hands of the IRA. The family denied the UVF allegation. Both the RUC and the Gardai carried out investigations into how the IRA obtained the document before Ian Sproule's killing. The RUC report said that the Gardai leaked it to the IRA. The Gardai report stated that it couldn't find a leak. The Sproule family give their reaction. Stephen Demptster then gives the names of 3 Garda members that the Smithwick Inquiry focused on over leaks. They were Sgt Finbar Hickey, who was convicted of giving false passports to members of the IRA but was not on duty the day of the Breen/Buchanan murders, Sgt Leo Colton. Who worked with Hickey on the false passport applications but on whom there was insufficient evidence to link him to the Breen/Buchanan killings and thirdly Detective Sgt Owen Corrigan, whom Smithwick found had a series of 'inappropriate dealings' with the IRA over a number of years, however there was insufficient evidence that he tipped them off in relation to the Breen/Buchanan killings. All 3 refuse TV interviews. John Mooney comments on Smithwicks's findings of problems within Dundalk Garda station. In 1989 smuggler John McAnulty was shot dead by the IRA in Culloville in south Armagh. He was also an RUC informer. Four years before his death he told his RUC handlers that Owen Corrigan was passing information to the IRA. Owen Corrigan says that this was just rumours. Then a film report shows the funeral of Louth farmer Tom Oliver, shot by the IRA in 1991. Smithwick was told that Owen Corrigan told the IRA that he was a Garda informer. Owen Corrigan is taking legal action regarding this section of the report. Stephen Dempster then highlights recent revelations about corruption and cover-up within the Gardai since Smithwick, and the public outcry about policing standards, with the Garda Commissioner and the Justice Minister both having to resign. Scandals included keeping phone records for 30 years, but Judge Smithwick was not told about these tapes. Journalist Ger Cunningham comments. Then David Trimble says that he wants a new inquiry. In 1986 Terence McKeever was killed by the IRA in south Armagh because his family firm did work on RUC stations. His sister Karen comments. A HET inquiry states that the gun used in his killing was also used in the Breen/Buchanan killings, and 16 items of forensic evidence stored by the Gardai went missing. Karen McInerney says that this wasn't an accident. She asked the Garda Ombudsman to investigate in 2009. 5 years later she is still waiting on a report. The Ombudsman's statement is read. John McBirney wants inquiries into all of these cases. Then a profile of Sean Gerard Hughes, a leading south Armagh republican. The RUC say his unit killed 80 people, including all of the murders in which collusion is alleged. He denies any participation in any IRA activities. John Mooney comments on his appearance before the Smithwick tribunal as part of a 3 man IRA delegation. In Castlederg John Sproule wants collusion dealt with. Both the Garda Commissioner and the Justice Minister declined an interview. Ger Cunningham says that dealing with the past is not a live issue in the south. John McBirney says that the southern government will have to play its role in providing information to the victims. Beattie Doak and his wife Jean comment on their loss, and the effect that it has had on them. Ten Stephen Dempster's closing remarks.
DVD No.
D10340
Tape No.
542
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8225



Date Broadcast:
Wed 28th May 2014
Duration:
8 mins 9 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
The DUP's Peter Robinson is criticized for supporting Pastor Jack McConnell's anti-Muslim remarks during a church service at his Whitewell church. Film report begins with clip of Pastor McConnell, then Peter Robinson's comments that he might 'trust a Muslim to go to the shops for him'. Then Martin McGuinness criticizes Peter Robinson's words, with Peter Robinson's reply that he is refusing to take lectures from the leader of a 'bloody terrorist organisation'. This afternoon Northern Ireland Secretary of State Theresa Villiers condemned Pastor McConnell's remarks, then Dr Raied Al-Wazzan of the Belfast Islamic Centre gives his reaction to Peter Robinson's comments. The Police Federation spokesman Terry Spence has criticized the PSNI Commanders for a failure of care during the loyalist flag protests. Terry Spence's words then Chief Constable Matt Baggott's response. The successor to Matt Baggott will be selected tomorrow at a meeting of the Policing Board. The current candidates are Assistant Chief Constable George Hamilton, who joined the RUC in 1985, Cressida Dick, a senior Metropolitan Police officer form London and Assistant Garda Commissioner Derick Byrne, who joined the Gardai in 1979. (Wed 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10340
Tape No.
342
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8226



Date Broadcast:
Wed 28th May 2014
Duration:
43 mins 10 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current affairs
Series Title:
The Nolan Show
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Stephen Nolan begins with a brief film clip of Peter Robinson defending Pastor Jack McConnell's remarks about Muslims. Then a film clip of Pastor McConnell's sermon in his Whitewell church is shown. He says that he doesn't trust Muslims and that Enoch Powell was right. He was a prophet and Islam is 'Heathen and Satanic', that it is a doctrine 'spawned in hell'. Then a film clip of Peter Robinson defending Pastor McConnell is shown. He agrees with McConnell that he doesn't trust Muslims other than to go to the shops for him. Then in the studio Stephen Nolan sits with Pastor McConnell and Dr Khalid Anis of the Islamic Society of Britain, who begins by asking whether Peter Robinson would trust a Muslim doctor treating a member of his family. He says that words of hatred always lead to actions of hatred. Then Nolan asks Pastor McConnell how he feels about having the support of Peter Robinson. He says that he is touched. He has known Robinson for years. McConnell lists other DUP figures who have stood up for him such as Poots, Wilson and Campbell. He says that they all believe in his ministry. He repeats that he doesn't trust Muslims as they are governed by Sharia Law. He is asked whether he trusts Dr Anis sitting across from him. He says that he does not trust him because of his religion. Dr Anis says that McConnell has no idea about the Muslim faith or Sharia. He says that Sharia influences his personal life. He gives 2.5% of his income to charity, and it is helpful to speak to someone who says hurtful things about his faith. Nolan says that it is facile to hate or mistrust someone you don't know. McConnell then repeats his beliefs about Sharia Law. He quotes over 2000 terror incidents since 9/11 that he says were carried out by people who believed in Sharia Law. Dr Anis replies that does this mean that Christianity is above any blame? He asks if he should get that list. He says that, by his words, McConnell has already incited hate crimes against Muslims in Northern Ireland. He accuses McConnell of talking from an angle of hate and mistrust. Dr Anis says that Britain is his country and he rejects McConnell's assertion that he cannot have Christian friends in Muslim countries. McConnell says that there are cell groups waiting to do violence just like the IRA. He also defends Enoch Powell's 'Rivers of Blood' speech. Dr Anis said that by this logic he shouldn't trust any individual in Northern Ireland because of the sectarian violence over the decades. McConnell repeats that if Dr Anis was instructed to do violence by Sharia Law then he would. He raises the case of women in Sudan, sentenced to be flogged and then executed. Dr Anis says that he has protested against this but McConnell says that he does not accept his word on this. They then talk about freedom of speech. Dr Anis says that he rejects stereotyping, but McConnell doesn't regret anything that he said and that what he said is the truth. Then people in the audience ask questions, which the panel answers. Pastor McConnell repeats his view that Sharia Law is evil. He quotes the case of Christians killed in a church attack in Pakistan. He says that the police are investigating his comments but that it is a freedom of speech issue. McConnell says that he has received support from Catholics and republicans. Then telephone comments. The first criticizes McConnell and Robinson, then more questions from the audience criticizing Peter Robinson. Dr Anis then gives his views on the impact of this story on Muslims in the UK. He says that stereotyping will lead to attacks against Muslims. He says that what happens in Muslim countries has nothing to do with him as he is British. Pastor McConnell is asked if, by his logic, he is responsible for loyalist killings in Northern Ireland as these come from within his community. He says no. The discussion then ends, and Stephen Nolan asks the Respect Party MP George Galloway to give his reaction to Peter Robinson's remarks. He calls it mindless, ignorant bigotry. He calls McConnell an embarrassing, foolish old man. On Robinson's comments he says that this was a car crash. He suggests that Robinson shouldn't go looking for investment from the Islamic world any time soon. He says that he has shown Northern Ireland to be a 400 year old throwback, Robinson should resign. McConnell was speaking hate speech, not free speech. George Galloway is asked about the case of the women in Sudan. He admits that there is Islamic extremism in the UK but will the Pastor's words stop that or encourage it? Peter Robinson was grossly irresponsible in his interview. He says there used to be plenty of pastors in Northern Ireland that used to talk about Catholics in the same way, calling the Pope the anti-Christ etc. He says that Christians should disassociate themselves from Pastor McConnell's comments. From the audience a man accuses George Galloway of scare-mongering and defends Pastor McConnell's comments in an angry tone. He clashes with Nolan over his shouting and says 'Christians are standing up. We ain't having it no more' and tells Galloway to go back to Britain. Galloway says he is disturbed by the amount of people who applauded the last speaker. As Galloway speaks the man continues to shout. Galloway repeats his concerns about McConnell's comments. In the audience a woman rejects the man's outburst as containing inaccurate information. Galloway wants Robinson to withdraw his remarks, which he said made him sad and calls the man in the audience a bigot.
DVD No.
D10340
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8227



Date Broadcast:
Thu 29th May 2014
Duration:
16 mins 30 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Peter Robinson makes a private apology to Muslim leaders in Belfast. Film report shows Muslim leaders arriving at Stormont to receive their apology. Then Dr Raeid Al-Wazzan comments on that. They also met the Sinn Fein Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness. Peter Robinson then comments on his apology. The report then reviews how this story has been reported around the world. Then Alliance MLA Anna Lo tearfully says that she is thinking of leaving Northern Ireland. Then the CBI's Nigel Smyth's views on the global effect on business that the incident has had. Then the Equality Commission's Peter Sheridan comments. Then Pakistan's former High Commissioner Akbar Ahmed's views on Peter Robinson, followed by a longer Peter Robinson interview with Tracy Magee. He also gives a reaction to Anna Lo's comments. He won't formally apologise as he has done nothing wrong and was misinterpreted. He defends Pastor McConnell's rights to free speech. He makes no comments on the theological aspects of McConnell's views. Northern Ireland's new Chief Constable will be Assistant Chief Constable George Hamilton. Film report on his career to date with Sharon O'Neill. Sinn Fein supports his appointment. He joined the RUC in 1985 and worked in Scotland, England and Wales. He will do an interview in the morning. Matt Baggott does not leave until September. The widow of PSNI Constable Stephen Carroll, Kate Carroll, says that she is glad that the two men convicted of his murder have lost their appeal. Film report reviews the 9/3/09 murder and the conviction of Brendan McConville and John Paul Wooton, with Kate Carroll's reaction. A 42 year old man has been arrested for questioning about the north Belfast murder of Kevin Kearney last October. Film report. (Thurs 10.30pm)
DVD No.
D10340
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8228



Date Broadcast:
Thu 29th May 2014
Duration:
34 mins 33 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Mark Carruthers begins by introducing tonight's panel for the debate. It's UK Independence Party (UKIP) councillor Henry Reilly, Alliance party's Stephen Farry and former Methodist President Reverend Harold Good and lobbyist Quintin Oliver. They will discuss the DUP's Peter Robinson's comments about Muslims and Alliance party's Ann Lo's decision to leave politics here because of racism. But firstly Mark Carruthers shows a film of Mark Devenport's interview with DUP leader Peter Robinson in which he asks him to explain his comment he would trust Muslims to go to the shop for him. Robinson says he was exaggerating to make a point, he says he would trust Muslim doctors to treat his family, he says there's no question he trusts Muslims, he didn't make any remarks himself about the Muslim faith, he just said he supported J McConnell's right of free speech to say what he felt. As a politician Robinson says he wouldn't make comments on religions, he does repeat that he doesn't trust those involved in terrorism, from any faith, he says he wants good relations in NI between all communities and deplores hate crimes, he would apologise if he had hurt or showed disrespect to Muslims. Alliance MLA Anna Lo outlines why his words aren't good enough for her, for months and two or three times a day racial minorities are attacked in NI, but for seven years the executive has not published its racial equality strategy. She says the DUP politicians come out to support the outrageous comments of Pastor McConnell and even the First Minister supports McConnell. It all makes her feel very vulnerable about walking on the streets. She recalls a recent verbal racist attack on her as she left a shop. She says her sons want her to leave NI. Mark Carruthers asks his panel about racism in NI. With Stephen Farry outlining what Alliance will do to protect minorities, racism is as big a problem as sectarianism here, he comments on Robinson's qualified apology, he says bridges need built. The executive meeting tonight had a major row about the issue, no details given but inter part relations are going down the tube rapidly. UKIP's Henry Reilly is distressed about Anna Lo but he says he she says silly things having referred to unionists as colonists. He says Muslims told him they don't feel under any additional threat since J McConnell's remarks. He says he doesn't know why Anna Lo feels vulnerable. He goes on to talk about the IRA killing people in South Armagh who Anna called Colonials. He says she should apologise for that. Stephen Farry replies quoting D McNarry's comment that the Alliance party didn't belong in NI. Stephen Farry sees that as a threat. Harold Good welcomes P Robinson's statement today, he calls on J McConnell to reflect and he talks about the power of words and quotes the bible. Quintin Oliver comments on Anna Lo's predicament, he calls for re-discussion on HAAS process. He comments on the effect of this dispute on NI's reputation abroad, it's been disastrous and he also criticises Henry Reilly's views on Anna Lo. Reilly condemns racism then adds on a 'but' Mark Carruthers challenges him on his justification, they disputed this point for several minutes with Henry Reilly also attacking the BBC. Stephen Farry says 'Here we see Henry Reilly attacking the victim' next item with 44 weeks to a Westminster election. Mark Carruthers introduces a Martina Purdy film report looking at what the experts think the recent results mean for progress at the executive following local council and euro elections. It begins with TUV Jim Allister saying to the DUP 'We are watching you'. Irish news journalist Allison Morris comments. Newton Emerson says the DUP will put the entire HAAS agenda on ice and Sinn Fein will continue to do nothing in the north to effect its chances in the Republic. TUV's Billy Dickson comments on unionist rejection of the DUP growing. New Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) councillor Lindsay Millar voices her views. DUP's Peter Robinson says their vote stood firm. Sinn Fein took votes off the SDLP, unionism will have to work with Sinn Fein no matter what. Newton Emerson and Henry Bell comment on TUV's euro votes becoming Stormont seats. Commentators A Kane and DR Oran Young give their views on tonight's panel discussion on racism and also Peter Robinson's remarks. Both express disappointment at what they heard. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6563



Date Broadcast:
Fri 30th May 2014
Duration:
10 mins 31 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In Derry dissident republicans have firebombed the Everglades Hotel. Film report with the Fire Service's T Ferguson's comments, then PSNI Stephen Cargin calls the bombers cowards. Then hotel guests' reactions. Then political reaction from newly elected Independent republican councillor Gary Donnelly, who would not condemn the bombers. Then the SDLP's Gerry Diver's views. Then the DUP's Gregory Campbell's views. The Police Ombudsman is to investigate the death of David Magowan in a cell in Lisburn Police station. Film report covers his arrest. The DUP's Peter Robinson has held a further private meeting with Muslim leaders regarding his remarks defending Pastor Jack McConnell's anti-Muslim views. Film report from Mark Devenport commenting on Reverend Kyle Paisley (Ian Paisley's son) comments calling Robinson a 'condescending ignoramus' and the DUP response. Also today the Deputy Prime Minister, Nick Clegg, has came out in support of Anna Lo. PSNI new Chief Constable George Hamilton gives his first press interview. Film report on his comments on his job as he sees it, the role of political leaders, hate crimes and community tensions. (Fri 6.30pm)
DVD No.
D10340
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8229



Date Broadcast:
Sat 31st May 2014
Duration:
3 mins 48 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Several Thousand people attend an anti-racism rally at Belfast City Hall addressed by Alliances Anna Lo. Film report on her speech in which she says she'll stay in NI. Mohammed Sam Aana wants a Peter Robinson public apology. Peter Sumadh shares his views. The rally organiser Aisling Gallagher shares her views. Incoming Lord Mayor Nicola Mallon also spoke. In Derry shots were fired at a bar, no one was injured. Also in Derry the Everglades hotel reopened today after Thursday's dissident Republican firebomb attack. (5pm Sat)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6564



Date Broadcast:
Sat 31st May 2014
Duration:
2 mins 15 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC Newsline
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Coverage of today's anti-racist rally at Belfast's City Hall. A smaller rally was also held at Derry. Short film clip of Anna Lo's speech, then Maciek Bator of NI's Polish Association comments. Vox Pop of people at rally regarding Peter Robinson's remarks. (5pm Sat)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6565



Date Broadcast:
Sun 1st Jun 2014
Duration:
2 mins 16 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC Newsline
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
No opening titles. Two Pakistani men have been assaulted in their homes in Parkmount Street in North Belfast. One of the men needed hospital treatment. Film report with Muhammad Asif Khattak interview on this attack and recent incidents. Muhammad also criticises DUP's Peter Robinson's recent remarks as unleader-like. In Derry a home was petrol bombed. (5pm Sun)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6566



Date Broadcast:
Mon 2nd Jun 2014
Duration:
15 mins 31 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
The UUP leader Mike Nesbitt met with Muslim leaders at Belfast's Islamic centre tonight. Film report from Sarah Moore with Mike Nesbitt's comments on his ongoing outreach programme. His visit was fast tracked because of events from the last two weeks. Report then reviews events since Pastor J McConnell's anti-Muslim remarks and DUP's Peter Robinson's reaction. Dr Rula Al Wazzan says that a Robinson public apology would be helpful. He points out Robinson made a private apology. Meanwhile Pastor James McConnell has been to visit two Pakistani men who were attacked in their North Belfast homes at the weekend. Film report with victim of hate crime Muhammad Asif Khattak's interview he says he would like to hear Robinson apologise for his remarks, its revealed J McConnell gave the men money to fix their broken window. Next report covers Anna Lo's attendance at anti-racism rally on Saturday. In her office she calls for Robinson to make a public apology as a private apology is not good enough. She also announces she won't stand for re-election in 2016 but will stay in NI. In Newtownabbey last night the car of Eleanor Kincaid was shot at, she says she will have to leave her home. Film report with interview. She blames loyalists for the intimidation in her Clough Fern estate. A memorial service has been held at the Mull of Kintyre for the 29 army and RUC casualties killed in a helicopter crash 20 years ago In June 1994. Film report. Today at Belfast City Hall Sinn Fein's Lord Mayor M O'Meuilloir handed over his chain of office to the SDLP's Nicola Mallon. In a film report he comments on the highlights of his year in office, public and personal. He mentions the attack on him in Woodvale and talks it down in a positive outlook. In the studio the new mayor Nicola Mallon outlines her priorities for the next year, she's only the 3rd woman mayor in 30 years. (10:30pm Mon)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6567



Date Broadcast:
Tue 3rd Jun 2014
Duration:
11 mins 42 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
The police ombudsman Michael Maguire it to take legal action against the PSNI Chief Constable over what he says is obstruction by the police of his inquiries into 60 murders. He says the PSNI are withholding files on the cases. Film report on reasons for unprecedented legal action to gain sensitive intel/information including details on police informers. Vincent Kearney begins with the June 94 Loughinisland pub murder of 6 RC's by the UVF. This is one of the cases the ombudsman believes he's not being told all about. The suspicion is that a proper inquiry wasn't conducted by the RUC as they were protecting an informer and because there was collusion between some RUC and the killers as in many of the 60 cases, no one has been convicted. A previous Al Hutchinson report concluded the RUC failed to investigate what happened at Loughinisland, but said there was insufficient evidence of collusion. These findings were quashed by a legal challenge by victims' relatives. The (MISSING) stands accused of blocking M Maguires new inquiry. M Maguire explains his position on these cases and the access he needs to 100 pieces of information he legally entitled to see. Another case the (MISSING) is blocking is the death of RUC constable Coleen McMurray in March 92. Its claimed two IRA informers were involved and special branch knew of the attack. M Maguire says the cases relate to the RUC and PSNI. DUP's P Robinson is meeting leaders of the Muslim community tonight at Belfast's Islamic centre. Film report from Martina Purdy. Earlier in the day P Robinson and Jonathan Bell took a group of Galway Muslims on a tour of Stormont, film clip shown. Imman Noonan comments on P Robinson being taken out of context earlier in the week. Meanwhile in the Stormont chamber today MLA's condemned recent racist attacks and expressed opposition to racism, discrimination and intolerance and voted for the introduction of a racial equality strategy. Mark Davenport report on the debate, with SDLP concerns that P Robinson wasn't in the chamber, he was meeting the parades commission. (6:30pm Tues)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6568



Date Broadcast:
Tue 3rd Jun 2014
Duration:
? mins ? secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
Documentary
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
DUP's P Robinson tonight made a public apology to Muslims at the Belfast Islamic centre for any offence he caused in his defence of the Pastor J McConnell's words. Film report from Sharon O'Neill shows Robinson arrive at the centre. Sinn Fein's M McGuinness will visit tomorrow. Outside 45mins later Robinson apologised, Dr Rula Al Wazzan thanks P Robinson for coming to the centre. The Pakistani man Muhammad Asif Khattak beaten in a racist attack recently gives his reaction to meeting P Robinson, but some of those at the meeting expressed different views and wanted more to be done for ethnic minorities. Robinson was asked to condemn Pastor McConnells words but Robinson said he doesn't get involved in doctrinal issues. In the studio Ken Reid gives his analysis of Robinson's apology and whether he has done enough to end the story. (10:30pm Tues)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6569



Date Broadcast:
Wed 4th Jun 2014
Duration:
9 mins 9 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
The PSNI has refused to release info about the dissident/republic bomb attack on PSNI officer Padear Heffron. Film report on ombudsman request on this case, he wants to find out if there was appropriate action after the tip off about the attack on P Heffron, but so far the PSNI haven't let him see the material he wants. V Kearney reviews the case with old film clips. The PSNI have always refused to release information on the murder of senior republican and state agent Denis Donaldson shot in Donegal in April 2006. M Maguire comments on his role and his rights to see his information. Then justice minister D Ford (Alliance) says he hopes the two sides can reach an agreement on a way forward. Next report from Mark Simpson looks at the killings at the centre of this controversy, among them the murder of Sinn Fein's Tom Casey in Cookstown in 1990, amidst claims of collusion, 25 years later and some files still remain secret. Colette Casey his daughter comments on this situation, then solicitor Shauna Carberry. The UFF murders of 5 men in Sean Graham's Ormeau Road bookies is another of the cases in the stand off. The parades commission has refused the orange order permission to parade past Ardoyne this Saturday. Film report with parades commission statement. UPRG's G Solinas reaction, then Sinn Fein's G Kelly's views. The former HET chief Dave Fox gave evidence to the Westminster inquiry about the OTR scheme and comments on John Downey case. Film report. (6:30pm Wed)
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
6570



Date Broadcast:
Wed 4th Jun 2014
Duration:
33 mins 57 secs
Broadcast Company:
Raidio Teilifis Eireann (RTE)
Channel:
RTE1
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
Investigations Unit
Programme Title:
Torture Files
Description:
This programme reveals evidence from around August 1971 and the British government. Introduction of interment in NI that shows a decision was take to use torture techniques on selected detainees. Programme uses old film clips and interviews from that time. 342 Republicans/Nationalists were arrested on August 9th over the next 3 days 21 people died, 17 shot by the British army, which included 11 of those in the Ballymurphy massacre. Film clip shows Tory Lord Carrington's comments on internment. Over few days 100 released, rest interned, some of those internees were subject to 'softening up' exercises. Gerard McKerr recalls some of these. Civil rights movement founder PJ McClean recalls being put in a helicopter with other hooded men, he was thrown out of the helicopter. Psychiatrist Robert Daly comments on the treatment by Oct 1971 14 men were put through deep interrogation at Ballykelly airbase near Derry, government instruction papers are shown. Liam Shannon comments. Operation Kalaba was overseen by a team of 15 from joint services interrogation wing along with the RUC special branch. Their 5 techniques were, Hooding, White Noise, Sleep Deprivation and Food & Water deprivation. Gerard McKerr recalls his experience, old film clip of Pat Shivers interview, on his treatment and the white noise. PJ McClean says it never stopped, all the techniques were used together and combined with assault and threats of death. Prison chaplain Raymond Murray interview on the men's condition at that time. Pictures of severe bruises shown. Professor Daly accesses the outcomes of this treatment, after 3 to 6 days the men were interned in prison. Film clip of British army under secretary Geoffrey Johnston Smith says the men claims were lies and government paper calls the men murderers. The programme looks at the reaction of B Devin and CRA and Jack Lynch Irish PM, who takes the case to euro court at Strasbourg in Dec 1971. In 1976 the court found UK guilty of inhuman treatment and torture but the commission was only an opinion. Ireland needed euro court to say the same, at that time TV report interviews PJ McClean, in 1977 PM Liam Cosgrove referred the case to the European court. In 1978 court by 13/votes to 4 overturned the euro/commissions report and found British guilty of inhuman and degrading treatment, not torture. British were pleased with the outcome. Government papers shown. The programme then reveals it has found records in British national archives which show the evidence that British withheld from the European/commission and euro/court, the records found by Pat Finucane centre show the British knew their techniques were severe, Mary McKenna recalls her fathers arrest. 10 days later she saw him, he was a broken man who never recovered. She recalls what they did to him in Ballykinlar. May 1972 he was released to psychiatric unit by 05/06/1975 he was dead. Professor R Daly recalls his evidence to the euro comm. The British doctor was Dennis Lee who had worked for British intel. R Daly recalls their court room differences. News clip from the time of the hearing shown. The programme shows the differences in Doctor Lee's evidence to the court from what the was telling the British government around Sean McKenna's condition, these reports were never shown to the euro court. The euro commission only hear from PJ Shivers and PJ McClean. Betty Shivers his wife recalls the damage done to him, professor Daly comments. Then secret papers on Shivers shown, he died in 1985 of cancer. The British evidence presented to the commission was the Compton report, it said there was no brutality, Ted Heath thought this comment went too far, archive papers shown on McClean/Shivers hours (MISSING). The unanswered question in Europe was who ordered it, a document discovered from M Rees names Lord Carrington minister of Defence as the man who ordered the interrogations. Letter shown D White trained 10 RUC officers to do the interrogating. Army letter shown about Ballykelly, PJ McCleam comments. The hooded men all suffered long term serious injuries/cancers. 3 PM's approve settlements to keep cases out of court. MOD release denial statement, then B Devin analysis of British policy then. In 1978 Britain said it wouldn't use techniques again but in 2003 they were used in Iraq again. Lawyer Phil Shinner comments. Then lieutenant colonel N Mercer on what he saw and did.
DVD No.
D10350
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Republic of Ireland
Record No.
6571



Date Broadcast:
Wed 4th Jun 2014
Duration:
33 mins 34 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The Nolan Show
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
In the last episode of the current series Stephan Nolan interviews Sinn Fein's Martin McGuinness about current relationships at the current Stormont executive with the DUP's P Robison and previously with Ian Paisley. He's asked on his past with the PIRA and his views on the peace process. His first question is about sharing power with P Robinson. McGuinness says they have a working relationship. He recalls the relationship with Paisley and the internal DUP hostility to how well he and Ian got on. He says that's one of the reasons why the got rid of him. McGuinness feels reconciliation is an important part of conflict resolution between political opponents. He rejects the journalist's claims that he and Robinson don't talk to each other as total nonsense. Prior to the Maze Long Kesh issue falling apart he is now very wary and he doesn't trust Robinson on that issue. He also has a different opinion on the racist attacks across the country. McGuinness would like more condemnation from unionist politicians. Nolan says to McGuinness 'Unionist aren't going to take lessons from you about violence' McGuinness replies he's looking to the future now, even though people might call him a hypocrite' McGuinness goes on to outline his peace agreements that he negotiated despite threats from dissident republicans. He's questioned about his reaction to Gerry Adams' arrest and his threat to withdraw from policing. McGuinness denies saying that. Nolan then reads out a recent insulting remark about McGuinness. McGuinness says he's not at loggerheads with Robinson but is with Cameron who has not yet met with Sinn Fein in 4 years despite him meeting with DUP. He talks about a letter he sent to Cameron on this topic, they discuss next years west minster election. Nolan asks McGuinness would he apologise for his past in the PIRA. McGuinness is sorry for people being hurt in the past. Nolan pushes this point, 'How sorry are you?' he asks. McGuinness says he wants judged on the contributions he has made to resolving this conflict over the last 20 years and that has included the PIRA ceasefire, decommission and getting support for the police. 'How sorry do you want me to be?' he asks. He then repeats that he would die to protect the peace process. Nolan then asks him when he will retire, McGuinness says the peace process is important to him, he's questioned about how comfortable he felt at the Queen's banquet. Nolan pushes him again on his retirement. McGuinness says it comes down to the health of yourself and your family. He goes on to say that he still meets with DUP MLA's at Stormont who won't say hello to him or even look at him, these people prefer confrontation to reconciliation, he's in reconciliation mode but can't do it on his own, there's a lot more to do. Interview ends. Back in the studio Nolan asks DUP's W Humphries MLA for his reaction to Sinn Fein meeting Cameron. He hopes Cameron stresses the shared future for everyone in NI to Sinn Fein, he goes on to defend Tory welfare reforms. W Humphries says he won't say hello to McGuinness at Stormont and explains why. S Nolan reviews the parading situation at Ardoyne with DUP's W Humphries and Republican commentator Chris Donnelly but the men give opposite views on the stand off and the orange order's Protestant camp at Twaddell Avenue. The parades commission has refused the orange order permission to walk past the Ardoyne shops this year. Humphries explains why this outcome disappoints him, he hoped for a different result. Chris Donnelly accuses the camp Twaddell nightly protests of inflaming bitterness in irresponsible matter, they then debate the costs of camp Twaddell. Humphries criticises the BBC because Nolan asks have they got home or are they all living in camp Twaddell? They debate the point that it's only the threat of violence from Republicans that stops the parades and they consider the possibility of trouble this summer. (Wed)
DVD No.
D10360
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8230



Date Broadcast:
Thu 5th Jun 2014
Duration:
5 mins 9 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Headlines then Chief Constable Matt Baggott has denied his is obstructing the Police Ombudsman's inquiries during a policing board meeting. Film report with Matt Baggott's remarks then reaction from Gerard O'Hara and DUP's Jonathon Craig. Matt Baggott also spoke about dealing with the past. (6pm Thurs)
DVD No.
D10360
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8231



Date Broadcast:
Thu 5th Jun 2014
Duration:
34 mins 17 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
Current Affairs
Series Title:
The View
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Mark Carruthers introduces tonight's topics then interviews both former Police Ombudsman Nuala O'Loan and DUP MP J Donaldson about the current Ombudsman M Maguire having to take the PNSI Chief Constable to court to get the info he needs on up to 60 cases he's investigating. Before that debate starts, he introduces a film report on today's Police Board meeting when ACC Finlay defended the Chief Constable's decision and explains their thinking on the issue. M Carruthers asks J Donaldson for his reaction. He replies by saying some of the (MISSING) highly sensitive about informers that could be killed like Denis Donaldson, J Donaldson comments on cases of PSNI Constable P Heffron and RUC Coleen McMurray, whom he helped. O'Loan says the law is clear Chief Constable shall provide the information that the Police Ombudsman needs and says the Ombudsman is well aware of his responsibilities towards informers. J Donaldson brings up the National Security issue as the cause of the delay but won't say the Ombudsman can't be trusted with National Security documents. M Carruthers informs him that the Ombudsman has a security clearing to a senior policeman. O'Loan won't speculate whether this is an attempt to protect police officers but says he will be seen as that. She just doesn't understand why the Chief Constable is doing this, she says there are retired police officers who want this information hidden. She says the Ombudsman has no option but to go to court. J Donaldson raises RUC C McMurray's case, when asked about P Heffron. He says there was no wrong doing against RUC men suspected, he repeats the Chief Constable blockage is about national security and counter terrorism and not shielding police misconduct. N O'Loan says for some reason in the past months the police have refused to hand over information. Next item looks at the poor performance of the SDLP in the recent council and European elections and the views within the party on A McDonnell's leadership. Film report from Stephen Walker on a tale from two cities in Derry and Belfast where the SDLP provides the Lord Mayor but activists are worried about seat loses. In Derry for the first time Sinn Fein outvoted the SDLP. Journalist Eamon Sweeney comments. A McDonnell's election targets profiled as failure. Nicola Mallon comments on this. Claire Hanna's views on fixing the messenger and the message. MLA C Eastwood says A Attwood will be MEP, he didn't. A McDonnell's leadership in question. Brian Turley former SDLP Comms/Director says the party is in decline, next 12 months are crucial for SDLP. Next item as parades commission again rejects the orange order's return parade past Ardoyne. In the studio, orange orders Mervyn Gibson and Sinn Fein's Alex Maskey debate the problem around this parade from two different viewpoints. The Derry model is mentioned. Alex Maskey says it's an issue of respect, he mentions inflammatory language at Twaddell camp on nightly basis. M Gibson says their protests are peaceful but its republican violence that is blocking progress. Breaches of laws at Twaddell by orange men said to be 200. M Gibson says it's about republican intolerance. They debate the toxic influence of the camp. Maskey mentions bandmen urinating at Catholic churches. M Gibson replies to this. Commentators A Kane and Paul McFadden give their views on tonight's discussion, especially the Ombudsman story. (Thurs)
DVD No.
D10360
Tape No.
543
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8232



Date Broadcast:
Fri 6th Jun 2014
Duration:
10 mins 0 secs
Broadcast Company:
British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)
Channel:
BBC1 NI
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
BBC Newsline
Programme Title:
n.a
Description:
Belfast pastor James McConnell who called Islamic faith satanic has made a public apology as he's questioned by the police over his remarks. Film report with his solicitor Joe Rice's comments at the police station. Review of this story over recent weeks. The son of murdered RUC officer, killed by PIRA in October 1988 John Larmour has backed the police ombudsman's legal actions against the PSNI Chief Constable over his withholding of police files. Film report with his son Gavin Larmour's comments and film clip of the murder scene. Gavin believes no one was charged as a PIRA informer was one of the killers. Former ombudsman O'Loan gives her views. In Derry the PSNI recruitment event got under way in the Everglades Hotel which dissident republicans had firebombed last week. Film report with PSNI Superintendent John Magill comments. Then hotel owner William Hastings views. At Belfast, Ulster Museum's Troubles art exhibition has opened with 60 works by 48 artists, film report with Kim Mawhinney's comments. Then Doctor Stefanie Lehner. (6:30pm Fri)
DVD No.
D10360
Tape No.
544
Country of Origin:
Northern Ireland
Record No.
8233



Date Broadcast:
Mon 9th Jun 2014
Duration:
12 mins 4 secs
Broadcast Company:
Independent Television (ITV)
Channel:
UTV (Ulster Television)
Type of Programme:
News Report
Series Title:
UTV News
Programme Title:
n.a.
Description:
Headlines then film report on problems of racist attacks on ethnic minorities in NI. Marc Mallett interviews Jayne Olorunda, raised in NI. Her father was Nigerian, her mother was from NI. Her father was killed by a PIRA bomb on a train in January 1980. News clip shown Jayne has not escaped racist abuse either. She rec